Location: Council Bluffs Iowa

Biographical Sketch of S. Altshuler

S. Altshuler, dealer in dry goods and clothing, came to Iowa in 1864, and located at Council Bluffs; established his present business in Missouri Valley in 1867. He has a fine store on the corner of Fourth and Erie streets, and carries a large stock of...

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Biography of F. C. Amsbary

F. C. Amsbary, superintendent and manager of the Champaign Waterworks, has been superintending waterworks plants in different parts of the country for upwards of thirty years. It has in fact been his regular profession, though some of his younger years were devoted to railroading. Mr. Amsbary has numerous connections that identify him with the substantial interests of his home city. A native of Illinois, he was born at Pekin, January 24, 1863, a son of William Wallace and Harriet E. (Harlow) Amsbary, both of whom are natives of New York State. William W. Amsbary moved to Champaign in 1907, and for several years was connected with the waterworks here. He died in 1911, and his widow is still living at Champaign. Their five children are: George E., of Urbana; F. C.; Wallace Bruce, of Chicago; Don H., of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Cordelia, still at home with her mother. When F. C. Amsbary was four years of age his parents removed to Delavan in Tazewell County, Illinois. He attended the local schools there, and at the age of fifteen he left home and worked as clerk in a store at Tremont in the same county for two years. He then went to Peoria and acquired his initial experience in railroad offices, where he remained about three years. He was next at Council Bluffs, Iowa, in the Chicago Northwestern Railway offices...

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Biography of Almon S. Senter

An eventful career was that of Colonel Almon S. Senter, who for some years figured conspicuously in connection with the mercantile and official interests of Lincoln County. At the time of his death, March 6, 1899, he was serving as district-court clerk and ex-officio auditor and recorder of Lincoln County, and he was also an enterprising and prominent merchant of Shoshone. A native of the old Granite state, he was born February 18, 1845, and is a representative of one of the old and honored families of New Hampshire, of English descent. His ancestors were early settlers of Londonderry, that state, and one of his great-granduncles served in the Colonial army during the Revolutionary war. The grandfather and father of our subject, both of whom bore the name of Thomas Senter, were natives of New Hampshire, the latter born in Petersboro. He wedded Miss Mary C. Giddings, a native of Temple, New Hampshire, and also a descendant of one of the prominent colonial families. Mr. Senter was an industrious farmer, who followed agricultural pursuits throughout his entire life. Both he and his wife were Methodists in religious belief, and the father lived to be sixty-four years of age, while the mother departed this life in her forty-seventh year, leaving a family of eleven children, the eldest but seventeen years of age, the youngest only three months old. Colonel Senter...

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Biography of William W. Woods

Idaho is fortunate in having an able bar. The importance of the legal business growing out of mining enterprises early drew to the state lawyers of ability and experience in large affairs and litigation involving big sums and values. As a result, there is at every important business center of the state legal talent which would do credit to Chicago or New York. Major William W. Woods, one of the leading lawyers of Idaho, was born in Burlington, Iowa, January 24, 1841, a son of James W. and Catharine (Wells) Woods. His father was a successful lawyer, and was born in New Hampshire in 1810, settled in Iowa in 1836 and died at Waverly, Iowa, in 1880. His mother was born in New York in 1825 and died at Burlington, Iowa, in 1864. Major Woods received an academical education at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, and at nineteen began the study of law in the office and under the preceptorship of J. C. & B. J. Hall, of Burlington, Iowa. He was called from his legal studies by the demand for soldiers to protect our national interests in the civil war, and in August, 1861, enlisted as a private in Company L, Fourth Iowa Volunteer Cavalry, with which he served until September 1865, when he was mustered out, with the rank of major, after having made an admirable record as a...

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Biography of William Woodward

One of the pioneer settlers of Franklin, Oneida county, Idaho, and a farmer of the above state, William Woodward, was born on the 4th of January, 1833, in Bushey, Hertfordshire, England. He received a common-school education in his native village. In 1845 he removed to Watford, and there he heard Mormonism by a blacksmith, Richard B. Margetts, and he was baptized June 21, 1848. He soon became anxious to join his coreligionists in Salt Lake valley, then in upper California. In January 1850, Mr. Woodward sailed from Liverpool, England, on the ship Argo, Captain Mills, with four hundred Latter Day Saints, arriving at New Orleans, March 8, after an ocean passage of eight weeks. With other emigrants Mr. Woodward wended his way to St. Louis, on the steamboat Glencoe: from there proceeded to Council Bluffs, where he arrived on April 9, and on the 13th of April he went to work for Orson Hyde, at six dollars per month. He lived with Mr. Hyde for over a year and then drove team to Salt Lake City, in Captain Horner’s company. They were some three months on the way. On the plains in that early day, 1851, thousands of buffalo were encountered on the way, and sometimes in the distance they appeared like a forest of timber; twenty thousand were passed in one day. The Platte valley and the hills...

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Biography of William Chester

The substantial rewards that come to the able and upright man as the result of well-doing, small as they may be in comparison with the fortunes and apparent honors won by questionable methods, bring With them a sense of satisfaction to which the sharp financier and the corrupt politician live and die as strangers. A man who wisely and honestly adjudicated the small misunderstandings of his fellow citizens for sixteen years, and who has the respect of all those for or against whom he has decided, as has Justice Chester, of Soda Springs, Idaho, has a greater reward than the perjured judge who ends his days in a bitter struggle to enjoy thousands obtained by oppression, injustice and a systematic affront to the law he has falsely sworn to uphold. William Chester, who is a member of the board of county commissioners, has been for sixteen years justice of the peace at Soda Springs, and is well and favorably known throughout eastern Idaho. He is a native of Lincolnshire, England, and was born May 3, 1843. His father, Thomas Chester, died when William was only a year old, and the baby was taken into the home of his grandfather, John Chester. He was educated in a plain, practical way, worked on the farm and learned the machinist’s trade. He came to America in 1873, with the expectation of having...

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Houses of the Oto Tribe

When Lewis and Clark ascended the Missouri during the summer of 1804 they reached the mouth of the Platte July 21. At that time, so they entered in their journal, the Oto were living on the south side of the Platte, 10 leagues above its junction with the Missouri, and 5 leagues beyond, on the same bank, were the Pawnee. Living with the Oto were the remnants of the Missouri who had, a few years before, joined them. On August 3, 1804, the expedition having ascended the Missouri to about the location of the present city of Council Bluffs,...

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Biography of Nelson Antrim Crawford

Nelson Antrim Crawford is professor of industrial journalism and superintendent of printing with the Kansas State Agricultural College. For several years he was instructor in English in the Agricultural College but has been head of the journalism work since April, 1914. In his special department he has done important work for the Agricultural College. For several years of his early life he was a newspaper reporter and was thus no stranger to the practical phases of journalism when he came to his present position. He has in the past two years increased the work of the department threefold. By virtue of being professor of industrial journalism he is also editor of The Kansas Industrialist, the organ of the Kansas State Agricultural College, and has charge of the college advertising and publicity. He is also editor of The Kansas Churchman, the official paper of the Episcopal Diocese of Kansas. He was born at Miller, South Dakota, but was reared at Council Bluffs, Iowa, where for many years his father practiced law. His father, Nelson Antrim Crawford, Sr., was born in Ohio of Scotch lineage, the Crawfords being an old Pennsylvania family. The senior Crawford married Fannie Vandercook, who was born in Wisconsin of Holland Dutch origin. She is directly descended from New York Knickerbocker ancestry, and one of her forefathers was Simon Vandercook, an officer in the American Revolution. The...

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Everson, Howard W. Sr. – Obituary

Howard W. Everson, 78, 2307 S. 6th St., died early today [March 19, 1982] at a local hospital after and extended illness. He was born and raised at Carson and had resided 40 years in Council Bluffs. He was a former employee of the city of Council Bluffs, and also had worked for Brandels Department Store and Yellow Cab. Mr. Everson was a member of Bethany United Presbyterian Church. Surviving are his wife, Lilly [Swanson].; a daughter, Mrs. Raymond (Rose) Lengyel of Omaha; four sons, Charles and James, both of Omaha, Robert of Dayton, Ohio and Howard of Warrensburg, MO.; 17 grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Monday at the Meyer Funeral Home. The Rev. David L. Grimm, pastor of the Bethany Church, will officiate. Burial will be in the Carson Cemetery. Visitation with the family will be from 7 to 8 p.m., Sunday at Meyer’s. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Wichman, Phyllis L. Olander Mrs. – Obituary

Phyllis L. Olander Wichman, 76, of Council Bluffs, Iowa, died March 6, 2005, at a Council Bluffs hospital. Her funeral will be at 10:30 a.m. Friday at the Broadway United Methodist in Council Bluffs. She was born on Oct. 6, 1928, to Carl Melvin and Myrtle Dorothea Swanson Olander at Stanton, Iowa. She was a 1946 graduate of Elliott, Iowa, High School and a 1950 graduate of Tarkio College at Tarkio, Mo. Her post-graduate work was done at the University of Nebraska at Omaha; the University of Northern Iowa at Cedar Falls, Iowa; Iowa State University at Ames; and the University of Iowa at Iowa City. She began her teaching career at Walnut, Iowa, in 1950. She taught business classes at Thomas Jefferson High School from 1953 to 1960. She taught at Abraham Lincoln from 1960 to 1962 and then returned to Thomas Jefferson where she was head of the business department and a lead teacher. She retired in 1990. She was a member of the Broadway United Methodist Church where she a member of the choir. She was a member of the American Association of University Women, Delta Kappa Gamma Beta Chapter, Council Bluffs Retired School Personnel, Federated Women of Iowa, Council Bluffs Art Council, Chapter GQ of PEO, AAUW Study Group and Book Review Group, Joslyn Art Museum and JAMA Southwest Iowa. She was preceded in death...

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Biography of David H. Wixom

David H. Wixom, the tenth of a family of twelve children of Nathan J. and Betsy (Hadlock) Wixom, was born in 1848 in Council Bluffs, Iowa. In 1850 his parents started with their family, consisting then of ten children, to cross the plains to California. They loaded three ox teams and one horse team with their effects, and brought fifty cows, ten head of horses and a small flock of sheep over as far as Salt Lake, where they spent the winter, and there their eleventh child, Charles W. Wixom, was born. In the spring of 1852 they resumed their journey to the Golden State, and settled in Monterey County, near San Juan Mission, and lived there two years, Mrs. Wixom and her daughters carrying on the dairy business with their cows, making butter and cheese, which they sold at very high prices, to go to the mines. They also kept a public house for the entertainment of travelers. Mr. Wixom devoted his attention to mining. In the spring of 1854 they removed to Los Angeles and two years later came to San Bernardino, and settled on a half block of land they purchased on the corner of Ninth and F streets. In 1857 Mr. Wixom sold out and took his family to Salt Lake, but returned to San Bernardino in August 1858, having been gone ten months. He...

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Biographical Sketch of Abner McCrary

Abner McCrary is a native of Union County, Illinois, born in 1835. His parents, John and Mary (Kellar) McCrary, natives of North Carolina and South Carolina respectively, moved to Hancock County in 1844. Next they moved to Wash vine, Iowa, and in 1846 to Council Bluffs, where they remained five years. In 1851 he moved to Utah, where he remained two years, and June 5, 1854, came to California, and bought forty acres of land three miles northeast of San Bernardino, where he now lives. Mr. McCrary has dealt some in buying and selling land, and has today a fine farm devoted to general farm products, fruit and vegetables. He is one of the pioneers who have borne the burden and heat of the day. He walked every step of the way from Utah to this county, not shirking a single duty on the way, and he has carried out these principles every day of his life since; he is an earnest worker and an honest citizen. In 1859 he married Miss Emma Lane, of Bowling Green, Kentucky, daughter of David and Lucinda Lane, both born in 1805. Mr. Lane died in Indiana, and Mrs. Lane still lives, at a ripe old age. She is well preserved, physically and mentally. Mr. and Mrs. McCrary have reared five children: Emeline, now Mrs. B. J. Robertson; Laura, wife of J. M....

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Biography of Danford Atwood

Danford Atwood was born in Connecticut in 1823. His parents were Mormons and moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, at an early day, and from thence to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where in 1850 Mr. Atwood married Miss Jane Garner, of Hancock County, Illinois. She was the daughter of George and Elizabeth (Hedrick) Garner, natives respectively of North Carolina and Indiana. They had six children. Mrs. Garner died in Illinois at the age of thirty-two, and Mr. Garner married Lydia Hill. In 1836 he went to Council Bluffs, where he remained nearly two years, and then came to California, in 1852, by ox team. He bought land on Lytle creek, where the woolen mill now stands, and was there for twenty years. He then sold out and went to Salt Lake, where he was killed by a runaway team August 31, 1877. After our subject’s marriage he lived at Council Bluffs ten years, where he was engaged in farming and stock raising. May 1, 1860, he left Council Bluffs, crossing the plains to California, and arrived in San Bernardino December 1 of the same year. Here he bought land, which he held two years and then sold. He then bought 100 acres of land in Warm creek district, where he now lives, built a comfortable residence and has done a good dairying business, also stock-raising and general farming for several years. They...

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Biographical Sketch of John Bottoms

John Bottoms was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1812, and came to America in 1840; he landed at New Orleans, and from there went to Nauvoo, Illinois, where he was a member of the Mormon Church. He remained there until 1845, when he went to Cincinnati and worked in a bucket factory for about three years. In 1848 he went to Council Bluffs and remained there until 1852. He then went to Salt Lake City and remained there until 1858, when he came to California. During this time he had had prolonged trouble with the Mormons and concluded to stand their arbitrary treatment no longer: hence he crossed the plains to California. He worked in Los Angeles County for a while and then came to San Bernardino County, where he purchased a ranch, on which he has resided ever since. He was married in Cincinnati, in 1847, to Miss Althea Ugle, a native of that city, of German descent. Mr. Bottoms is one of the first settlers in this valley, has been an honest and upright citizen, and is respected by all who know...

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Biography of Joseph Camp Thorn

Joseph Camp Thorn, residing four miles east of San Bernardino on the Base Line, is one of the pioneers of this county. He was born in New York, January 2, 1839, the son of Joseph and Lorana (Camp) Thorn. When the subject of this sketch was three years of age his father moved to Nauvoo, Illinois. The next year he removed to Council Bluffs, Iowa, and the following year he moved to Salt Lake. Our subject was then eight years old and he drove an ox team all the way from Council Bluffs to Salt Lake. Mr. Thorn lived at Salt Lake for ten days and, disgusted with the Mormon religion, went back to Iowa; then came on, in 1854, to California. The subject of this sketch, then a lad of fourteen, drove his ox team from Salt Lake to San Bernardino. While on the journey he stood a regular herd and guard tower with the men. After his arrival here he worked at various occupations, and in 1858 was married to Miss Mary H. Dickson, born in Iowa. Her parents, David and Nancy (Stevens) Dickson, natives of Canada, crossed the plains in 1853, losing a man and nearly all their stock by Indians, and located at San Bernardino. At one time Mr. Dickson owned the block where the Stewart Hotel now stands, and other valuable property. He died...

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