Location: Columbus Mississippi

North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned regarding the real and true inner life of that peculiar and seemingly isolated race of mankind, that today only here and there can one be found who, from a lifetime association and intimate acquaintance, is well versed in Indian thought, feeling and character, and able to unfold and record the solution of that imagined mystery known as “The Indian Problem,” since they learned it from the Indians themselves. From the Indians own lips they were taught its elucidation, and only as it could be taught and learned, but never again can be taught and learned. Even as various nations of antiquity of, the eastern continent have left the evidences of their former occupation by the geographical names that still exist, so to have the North American Indians left their...

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Choctaw Nation and the Greer County Dispute

The Dispute In The Right Of Ownership Of Greer County Between The United States And Texas. The petition of the Attorney General of the United States affirms that according to the treaty of Feb. 22, 1819 made by the United States and the King of Spain, which was ratified two years later, and so proclaimed by both the United States and Spain, and that by the third article of the treaty it was provided and agreed that the boundary line between the two countries west of the Mississippi River shall begin on the Gulf of Mexico at the mouth...

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The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man to witness, except that of Sam Dale, the great scout of General Andrew...

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Slave Narrative of Anna Baker

Interviewer: Mrs. Richard Kolb Person Interviewed: Anna Baker Location: Aberdeen, Mississippi Age: 80 Anna Baker, 80-year old ex-slave, is tall and well built. She is what the Negroes term a “high brown.” Her high forehead and prominent cheek bones indicate that there is a strain of other than the pure African in her blood. She is in fair health. “Lemme see how old I is. Well, I tells you jus’ lak I tol’ dat Home Loan man what was here las’ week. I ‘members a pow’ful lot ’bout slavery times an’ ’bout ‘fore surrender. I know I was a right smart size den, so’s ‘cording to dat I mus’ be ‘roun’ ’bout eighty year old. I aint sho’ ’bout dat an’ I don’t want to tell no untruth. I know I was right smart size ‘fore de surrender, as I was a-sayin’, ’cause I ‘members Marster comin’ down de road past de house. When I’d see ‘im ‘way off I’d run to de gate an’ start singin’ dis song to ‘im: ‘Here come de marster, root toot too! Here come Marster, comin’ my way! Howdy, Marster, howdy do! What you gwine a-bring from town today?’ Dat would mos’ nigh tickle him to death an’ he’d say, ‘Loosahna (dat was his pet name for me) what you want today? I’d say, ‘Bring me some goobers, or a doll, or some...

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Biography of Hiram W. Lewis, Col.

Col. Hiram W. Lewis. In many important ways the city of Wichita expresses the life, ideals, and activities of the late Col. Hiram W. Lewis. In his time he was undoubtedly one of the most forceful figures and one of the ablest business men and citizens in the State of Kansas. When he came to Wichita about 1875 he had already acquitted himself with credit both as a soldier in the Civil war and as a business man. Born near Warren, Ohio, he lived in Ohio during his youth and on May 25, 1863, enlisted in Company E of the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Ohio Infantry. He went out as a private, becoming corporal, and was in many of the important battles of the great campaigns by which the states of Tennessee and Georgia were wrested from the Confederacy. He was wounded in the arm at Chickamauga. After his honorable discharge on May 15, 1865, he identified himself with the South and bought a plantation near Columbus, Mississippi. He remained on that plantation for ten years, and also took a very active part in public affairs. He served as sheriff of his county, and for several years represented his district in the State Legislature. Colonel Lewis during his residence in Wichita was primarily a banker. When he came to Wichita he organized the Kansas National Bank, of which he...

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Biography of Miss Callie Eaton

There is no doubt that the teacher is one of the most important forces in the progress of the world, and Rachel Caroline Eaton, familiarly known as “Miss Callie,” county superintendent of schools of Rogers county with residence in Claremore, a conscientious and progressive educator, deserves prominent mention in a work relating to northeastern Oklahoma and those who have contributed most to its development. A native of Oklahoma, she is a daughter of G. W. and Nancy Elizabeth (Williams) Eaton. Mr. Eaton came to Indian Territory soon after the Civil war and Married Nancy Williams of Siloam Springs, Arkansas. In the early ’70s they located at the foot of Claremore Mound, five miles north of Claremore. There the father engaged in farming and stock raising, likewise operating a mercantile business in Claremore. He is now seventy-eight years of age and is living in retirement at Inola, Rogers County, where he owns a farm. The mother is deceased. She was a daughter of Merritt and Lucy (Ward) Williams, the father being a member of a fine old Boston family. Mrs. Williams was a descendant of “Grannie” Ward, a Cherokee, and a historical character among her people in Georgia. The Ward family were southern sympathizers during the Civil war and were driven from their home, returning at the close of that conflict. During the war they lived in Texas and St....

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