Location: Columbiana County OH

Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next with 1,605 and 1,542 respectively. Exceptional causes made the little town of Guilford (now numbering scarcely more than one thousand inhabitants), till after the year 1800, the most populous town in the state. In Norwich, the great falling off in the size of families in recent years is seen in the fact, that in the year 1800, the number of children of school age was 604, out of a total population of 1,486, while in 1880 with a nearly equal population (1,471) it was but 390. In the removal of large numbers of the native-born inhabitants by emigration, we must find the principal cause of the decline of our rural population. Preeminently is this true of Norwich. The outflow of people began very early and now for more than...

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Andre, Thomas Jefferson, Dr. – Obituary

Dr. Andre Answers His Last Summons After Doing Good to Mankind for More than Forty Years, Dr. T. J. Andre Goes Down the Long, Long Trail The news of the earthquake in California was not half so startling as the news on Tuesday morning that Dr. Andre had passed away at about 4 o’clock that morning after an illness of only a few hours, of angina pectoras. On Monday evening he had an attack of the trouble and for a time was quite sick but appeared recovered from it and was feeling considerable better Tuesday. Dr. Armstrong came over from Ida Grove to see him Tuesday morning and advised him to go to bed and keep quiet, but anyone acquainted with the doctor knows that inactivity is not in his vocabulary – he has never known such a word, and during the afternoon he was around as usual although not doing much in the way of work, and was feeling pretty good. About 6:30 he had another attack and he completely collapsed and from that time he continued to fail. Dr. McCray was summoned as also was Dr. Parker of Ida Grove, but it was very evident to them that the end was not far off. He rallied some but relapsed again and the end came at 4 o’clock yesterday morning. Thomas Jefferson Andre was born on May 10,...

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Through Ohio And Kentucky

Sunday, Oct. 18.–Myself and friend proceeded on our journey. We arrived at Siers, a distance of thirty miles, at dusk, much relieved by the change from our horses to the wagon. The roads were muddy, the weather drizzly and the country hilly. Buildings indifferent. The land very fertile and black. Trees uncommonly tall. Passed the little village of Cadis. In this country a tavern, a store, a smith shop and two or three cabins make a town. Passed ten or fifteen travelers. Great contrast between the quality of the land from Chambersburg to Pittsburg, and that which we have already traveled over from Steubenville in Ohio. Monday, Oct. 19.–Left Siers at 6 o’clock a. m. The morning fair and cold. Roads extremely rough. Country fertile, but hilly. Log cabins, ugly women and tall timber. Passed a little flourishing village called Freeport, settled by foreigners. Yankee Quakers and mechanics. Remarkable, with two taverns in the village, there was nothing fit to drink, not even good water. The corn fields in the woods among dead trees and the corn very fine. We arrived at Adairs, a distance of twenty-seven miles, at 6 o’clock p. m. Passed some peddlers and a few travelers. Value of land from Steubenville to Adairs from $2 to $30 per acre. Lots in Freeport, eighteen months old, from $30 to $100. This day being Monday and the...

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Biographical Sketch of Dr. Isabel Cobb

(See Grant)-Martha Blythe, born Jan. 31, 1812. Married in May 1828 Alexander Clingan, born Feb. 20, 1801 in Hawkins County, Tennessee. He died February 1, 1964 and she died August 7, 1868. They were the parents of: Evaline Clingan, born in Bradley County, Tennessee, April 13, 1835. Married December 15, 1857, Joseph Benson Cobb, born in Blount County, Tennessee, July 26, 1828. He died March 22, 1896, and she died November 17, 1918. They were the parents of Isabel, born October 25, 1858; William Cowan, born April 1, 1860 and was murdered July 27, 1880; Martha, born December 28, 1861; Joseph Benson, born February 21, 1863; Alexander Clingan, born September 15, 1864; Samuel Sylvester, born December 12, 1865, and Addie Malinda Cobb, born September 9, 1870. Isabel Cobb, graduated from Female Seminary, January 27, 1879, Glendale Female College, Glendale, Ohio, June 8, 1881 and the Womans Medical College of Pennsylvania May 5,1892. Since that date she has been a regular practitioner at Wagoner. Martha Cobb graduated from Female Seminary, June 30, 1888 and Kansas Agriculture College June 6, 1888. Married June 11, 1891, Clement George Clarke, born February graduated from Kansas Agricultural College, June 6, 1888, Yale Academy in 1895, and the Theological Course in Yale in 1900. A Congregationalist minister, he was lecturer on social hygiene with the American Army in France. They are the parents of Helen...

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Slave Narrative of Aunt Betty Cofer

Interviewer: Esther S. Pinnix Person Interviewed: Betty Cofer Location: North Carolina Date of Birth: 1856 Age: 81 Negro Folk Lore Of The Piedmont. Sources of Information: Aunt Betty Cofer–ex-slave of Dr. Beverly Jones The ranks of negro ex-slaves are rapidly thinning out, but, scattered here and there among the ante-bellum families of the South, may be found a few of these picturesque old characters. Three miles north of Bethania, the second oldest settlement of the “Unitas Fratrum” in Wachovia, lies the 1500 acre Jones plantation. It has been owned for several generations by the one family, descendants of Abraham Conrad. Conrad’s daughter, Julia, married a physician of note, Dr. Beverly Jones, whose family occupied the old homestead at the time of the Civil War. Here, in 1856, was born a negro girl, Betty, to a slave mother. Here, today, under the friendly protection of this same Jones family, surrounded by her sons and her sons’ sons, lives this same Betty in her own little weather-stained cottage. Encircling her house are lilacs, althea, and flowering trees that soften the bleak outlines of unpainted out-buildings. A varied collection of old-fashioned plants and flowers crowd the neatly swept dooryard. A friendly German-shepherd puppy rouses from his nap on the sunny porch to greet visitors enthusiastically. In answer to our knock a gentle voice calls, “Come in.” The door opens directly into a...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry King

It is not the rule for men to follow the trade or profession to which they are best adapted and to achieve the dominant ambition of their lives. This inclination and result can in absolute truth be said of Capt. Henry King. He learned the printer’s trade because the attraction was irresistible, and advanced from the composing room and hand press to the editorial desk because he must have foreseen the work he was best fitted to do. His taste and capacity were for writing, a natural force impelling him to reduce the workings of his mind to written form–and it was real writing, for he never used a stenographer or typewriter, and his “copy” was the perfection of chirography. As a young man he published and edited a weekly newspaper at his home town, LaHarpe, Illinois. This work was interrupted by a four years’ service in the army in 1861-65. Returning from the army, he engaged in a profitless mercantile business, and studied law, but all the time there was a ceaseless call to write, and he was soon working on the Daily Whig, at Quincy, Illinois, of which he became editor. Later, in 1869, he removed to Topeka, where in turn he edited the State Record, the Commonwealth and the Capital. From the latter post he went to the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, in 1883, first as contributing editor,...

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Biography of Amasa B. Campbell

The rapid development of all material resources during the closing years of the nineteenth century has brought business enterprises up from the day of small things to gigantic proportions, where millions of dollars take the place of hundreds and where men are required to handle millions as coolly, as carefully and as successfully as their grandfathers handled hundreds. All the history of the world shows that to grapple with all new conditions, to fill breaches in all great crises men have been developed and have stood ready to assume new and great responsibilities and have discharged them well and profitably. Many youths now taking their first lessons in practical business will work up gradually from one responsibility to one higher, and then to still higher ones, as did Amasa B. Campbell, Idaho’s great mining magnate, and will be, as he was, the right man for the place, when, in the march of advancement, the place is ready and they are needed in it. Amasa B. Campbell is a son of John and Rebecca (Snodgrass) Campbell, and was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, April 6, 1845. His father, a native of Pennsylvania, died in Illinois in 1845, aged forty-five years, and his mother, whose life began and ended in Ohio, died in 1892, at the age of eighty-six. Mr. Campbell’s boy-hood was passed in his native county, where he attended...

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Biography of Edward Buckman

Edward Buckman. A few years ago Edward Buckman retired from his farm in Shawnee County, where he had spent the most profitable years of his life, and is now living retired at his home 1516 Guthrie Street in Topeka. The Buckman family has played a very worthy part in developing the lands of Kansas since pioneer times, and Mr. Edward Buckman has also found opportunity at different times to exercise his influence for good in local affairs. He was born on a farm in Columbiana County, Ohio, June 26, 1853, one of the four children born to Thomas and Susan (Howell) Buckman, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. Of these four children the two now living are Edward and his sister Mercy, Mrs. W. H. Coultis of Topeka. In 1869 Thomas Buckman and his family and also his brother A. Harding Buckman brought their families out to Kansas, locating on adjoining farms in Shawnee County. Thomas Buckman and family for three years lived on seventeen acres on West Sixth Street in Topeka, and in 1872 moved out to the land which in the meantime he had broken up with teams of oxen and horses, and thereafter he gave all his time and energy to the improvement and cultivation of this place. The life and character of the late Thomas Buckman were such that they deserve more than passing...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank A. Arter

Arter, Frank A.; retired; born, Hanoverton, O., March 8, 1841; son of David and Charlotte Laffer Arter; Hanover High School and Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa.; degrees, A. B. and M. A., Allegheny; married, Cleveland, Eliza Kingsley; issue, Mrs. Fred L. Taft, Mrs. Lewis E. Myers and Charles K. Arter; director First National Bank; Cleveland Steamship Co.; Cleveland Life Insurance Co.; Land Title Abstract Co.; vice pres. Children’s Industrial School; pres. Board of Trustees, Allegheny College; treas. N. E. O. Annuity Fund; director St. Luke’s Hospital; pres. Layman’s Ass’n, N. E. O. Conference; treas. First M. E.; member Union, Colonial, Wickliffe-on-the-Lake and Willowick Country Clubs; member Phi Kappa Phi and Phi Beta...

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Biographical Sketch of John Hessin Clarke

Clarke, John Hessin; lawyer; born, Lisbon, O., Sept. 18, 1857; son of John and Melissa Hessin Clarke; educated in public schools and by private tutors; entered Western Reserve College, at Hudson, O., graduating in 1877; degree of M. A.; in 1880, studied law under his father’s instruction, and was admitted to the bar in 1877; until 1880, practiced law at Lisbon, O., in partnership with J. M. McVicker; purchased half interest in the Youngstown Weekly Vindicator; practiced law in Youngstown, and wrote political editorials for the Vindicator; sold interests in the paper in 1882; came to Cleveland in 1897, and entered the firm of Williamson & Cushing; firm became Williamson, Gushing & Clarke, specializing in railroad and corporation law; in 1898, appointed general counsel for the N. Y., C. & St. L. R. R. Co.; interested in other railroad corporations; in 1907, dissolved partnership with Mr. Cushing; prominent in state and national Democratic issues; three years trustee of the Cleveland Library Board; pres. of board last term of office; stockholder and contributor to the columns of the Youngstown Vindicator; member American and State Bar Ass’ns, Union, University, and Country Clubs, Cleveland, and the University Club, New York...

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Biographical Sketch of Don Berry Ford

Ford, Don Berry; dentist; born, Leetonia, O., Nov. 2, 1879; son of Homer J. and Emma Berry Ford; graduate of Western Reserve University; doctor of dental surgery; began practice in 1905; member Ohio Dental Ass’n, W. R. U.; Dental Alumni Ass’n, Cleveland Lodge, No. 18, B. P. 0....

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Biographical Sketch of William Gaston

Gaston, William; clergyman; born, Columbiana County, O., April 19, 1835; son of James W. and Rebecca Conke Gaston; A. B., Washington College, Pa., 1858; grad. Western Theological Seminary, 1861; (D. D., 1887, LL. D., 1892, Richmond College Ohio); married, Julia M. Cunningham, of Smith’s Ferry, Pa., May 4, 1855 (died March, 1896); second wife, Jennie L. Wise, of Washington, Pa., Aug. 2, 1898; ordained Presbyterian ministry, 1861; pastor, Smith’s Ferry, Pa., 1861-1865; First Church, Bellaire, O., 1865-1880; North Church, Cleveland, 1880-1907; Emeretus, 1907; chaplain U. S. Christian Comma in Civil War, director University of Wooster, O.; Republican; Presbyterian; has traveled in Europe and the...

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Biographical Sketch of George Armstrong Garrettson

Garrettson, George Armstrong; banker; born, Columbiana County, O., Jan. 30, 1844; son of George and Ann Griffith Garrett-son; educated, public schools and private schools, Cornwell-on-the-Hudson, N. Y.; in 1870, married to Ann Scowden; in 1888, second marriage to Emma R. Ely; issue, three children, Margaret, George and Hiram; enlisted in Co. E, 84th O. V. I., 1862; graduated West Point Military Academy, 1867; appointed 2nd Lieut. 4th U. S. Artillery and served to Jan. 1, 1870; appointed on staff of Maj. Gen. John Poe; resigned in 1870, and returning to Cleveland, engaged with Second National Bank; elected cashier in 1880; cashier National Bank of Commerce, 1883; vice pres. 1885; now pres. Bank of Commerce, N. A.; interested in various corporations; member Ohio Commandery, Loyal Legion of the U. S.; brig. gen. of Volunteers, Spanish-American War, 1898, commanding Second Brigade, First Division, Second Army Corps, under fire in Porto Rico and recommended for brevet as major general; member Union, Country, Roadside and Euclid Clubs of Cleveland; and University Clubs of Cleveland and New York; member Naval and Military Order, Spanish-American War, Military Order of Foreign Wars and United Spanish War...

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Biographical Sketch of Arthur Winfield Thomas

Thomas, Arthur Winfield; bond broker; born, East Liverpool, O., May 24, 1880; son of William and Mary Shannon Thomas; educated, public and private schools; married, Cleveland, Nov. 1, 1905, Jennie H. Lucas; issue, one son, William A.; since 1900, has represented large bond houses in Cleveland; at present mgr. Colonial Securities Co., of Cleveland; industrial corporation bonds a specialty; editor Photo-Play Magazine; vice pres. The Colonial Securities Co.; director The Dreman Cleaning Co., and The Warwick Glass Co.; member Marion Lodge, No. 70, F. & A. M., Lodge No. 50, I. O. O. F.; member Sons of Veterans, Independent Order of Heptassphs; member Screen Club, N. Y. City, City and Author’s Clubs, Cleveland. Author of “Two Hundred Women,” and a number of short stories; his father, William H. Thomas, for a number of years was mgr. of the Dresden Pottery Co., of East Liverpool, and pres. R. Thomas & Sons Potteries; served through the Civil War in 14th Ohio Vol....

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