Location: Columbia County WI

Wisconsin Gold Star List – Columbia County

Army Ashley, Irving, 20, Portage; pvt 16inf; WNG; Soissons; kia Jy 18, ’18. Breneman, Maurice Wilson, 22, Pardeeville; SATC, Kansas City; dd (pneu) Oct 4,’18. Buglas, Kenneth G., 23, Portage; pvt 1cl 128inf, 16inf ; dw Jy 19, ’18. Byam, Cheney A., 28, m, Portage; pvt COTS, Camp Taylor; dd (pneu) Oct 10, ’18. Christopherson, Otto, 25, Kilbourn; pvt 343inf; overseas; dd (pneu) Oct 1, ’18. Cleary, Thomas W., 25, Portage; WNG; pvt 1cl 128inf, 16inf; kia May 11,’18. Clemmons, Louis, 30, Portage; pvt 7inf ; kia Oct 15, ’18. Cole, Edgar E., Fall River; pvt 334inf; dd (pneu) Nov 6,’18. Cook, William G., 24, Poynette; pvt 27rctco, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. ; dd (pneu) Oct 20, ’18. Crombie, William Carlton, 21, Fall River; pvt SATC, Kansas City; dd (influ) Oct 4, ’18. Dahl, Levi E., 35, Lodi; pvt 75CAC; overseas; dd (sc fev) Oct 19, ’18. De la Ronde, Nelson R., 23, Portage; WNG; pvt 1cl 16inf; kia Jy 23, ’18. Devine, Leo A., 30, Portage; pvt 148inf; overseas; dd (pneu) Oct 25, ’18. Donahue, Earl P., 22, Doyleston; SATC UW; dd (influ and pneu) Oct 30, ’18. Gehr, Lee W., 25, Portage; pvt 16inf; Montdidier-Noyon, AisneMarne, defsec; kia Jy 20, ’18. Grabman, Carl Edward, 23, Portage; pvt 310inf; dw Nov 3, ’18. Hageman, Roy Henry, 22, Lodi; pvt unasgnd; U. S.; dd (pneu) Oct 18, ’18. Hancock, Eugene...

Read More

Kickapoo Indians

Kickapoo Indians. From Kiwegapaw`, “he stands about,” “he moves about, standing now here, now there.” Also called: A’-uyax, Tonkawa name, meaning “deer eaters.” Higabu, Omaha and Ponca name. I’-ka-dŭ’, Osage name. Shake-kah-quah, Wichita name. Shígapo, Shikapu, Apache name. Sik’-a-pu, Comanche name. Tékapu, Huron name. Yuatara’ye-ru’nu, a second Huron name, meaning “tribe living around the lakes.” Kickapoo Connections. The Kickapoo belonged to the Algonquian linguistic stock, and in a special group with the Foxes and Sauk. Kickapoo Villages. The villages were: Etnataek (shared with the Foxes), rather a fortification than a village, near the Kickapoo village on Sangamon River, Illinois. Kickspougowi, on the Wabash River in Crawford County, Illinois, about opposite the mouth of Turman Creek. Kickapoo Location. For territory occupied in Wisconsin, see History. (See also Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, and Oklahoma.) Kickapoo History. As suggested in the case of the Foxes, the Kickapoo may once have lived near the Sauk in the lower peninsula of Michigan but such a residence cannot be proven. If the name Outitcbakouk used by the Jesuit missionary Druillettes refers to this tribe, as seems probable, knowledge of them was brought to Europeans in 1658. At any rate they were visited by Allouez about 1667-70 and were then near the portage between Fox and Wisconsin Rivers, perhaps about Alloa, Columbia County, Wisconsin. Early in the eighteenth century a part of them settled somewhere...

Read More

Menominee Indians

Menominee Indians were located on and near the Menominee River, Wisconsin, and in Michigan on or about the present location of Mackinac. The Menominee belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and to the same section as the Cree and Foxes.

Read More

Biography of James A. Wilson

James A. Wilson.One of the richest oil land districts of Kansas is the territory lying in the vicinity of El Dorado, the county seat of Butler County. Among its citizens who have become prominent factors in oil production is James A. Wilson. All through this locality rich strikes have been made, and one of the best was on the land owned by Mr. Wilson, just 1 1/2 miles north of El Dorado. This copious pool was the third one developed and had become famous as the Derby-Wilson lease of 480 acres. Mr. Wilson had twenty-one producing oil wells on the land at present. Mr. Wilson came to Butler County in its pioneer days. He was ambitious and energetic, and long before the development of the oil fields had acquired interests that made him one of the chief cattle men and one of the largest land holders. James A. Wilson was born in Columbia County, Wisconsin, December 23, 1850, a son of Daniel and Mary J. (Wood) Wilson. He is descended from a titled family of England. His grandfather, the founder of this branch in America, was a second son. Not being in line for an inheritance from his father he sought a new field of opportunity in Canada and there spent the remaining years of his life, his death occurring in the City of Montreal. In that city in...

Read More

Biography of Alex Furgason

ALEX FURGASON. – One of the earliest pioneers of Union county, and one who has been a real pioneer of the pioneers, the subject of this sketch is eminently worthy to be represented in a work of the character of our volume, since also he has always maintained a bearing of uprightness and manifested principles of truth and probity, and has wrought during all the years of his domicile here for the development of the county’s resources and for the interests of all, while he has prosecuted successfully his private business enterprises. Mr. Furgason was born in Rouse’s Point, New York, on March 26, 1826, and there he was reared on a farm until he was nineteen years of age. He was well educated in the common schools of his native place, and at the age mentioned he departed from the parental roof and migrated to Pilot Mountain, in the Iron mountains of southwestern Missouri. In that place he assisted in establishing the Iron Mountain Works, where he wrought for three years, then returned to New York on a visit, whence he went to Portage, Wisconsin, and there engaged in lumber business for about fourteen years, or until 1862. In that year he was led by an adventurous spirit to join the Davis train, which was bound for Oregon and across the plains to Union county. While en route...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Charles A. Baker

Charles A. Baker of Wichita lacked only three or four months of being a native son of Kansas. He has spent practically his entire career in this state, and by close attention to his business as a plumber has built up one of the leading establishments at Wichita, and his business is registered under the state laws. He was born at Rio, Wisconsin, June 30, 1870, and it was in September of the same year that his parents moved to Arkansas City, Kansas. After a public school education, gained in Wichita, he began an apprenticeship at the plumbing trade, and followed it as a journeyman until 1900. Since then for more than fifteen years he has been in the plumbing business for himself, first at Hutchinson but since 1902 at Wichita. Mr. Baker is a thirty-second degree Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine, and is also an Elk. His father was an old soldier, so he has continued the military record of the family and is now serving as a regimental quarter-master with the rank of captain in the Second Kansas Infantry. He has been on the border at Eagle Pass and San Antonio, Texas, since July 1, 1916. On December 4, 1895, Mr. Baker married Miss Lillie E. Bennett of Wichita. They have a daughter Marcia Helen, who is now a student in the Wichita High...

Read More

Biography of William Wesley Robb

William Wesley Robb, who is superintendent of the electric light plant at Chanute, began his career as a locomotive fireman and had filled many positions of responsibility, chiefly as a manager of machinery and plants, and much of his service had been rendered in the State of Kansas. He is of Scotch ancestry. His great-grandfather came from Scotland and was an early settler in Ohio. His grandfather, James Warren Robb, was born in the State of Illinois, in 1824, and died in Mercer County in that state in 1902. By profession he was an attorney, but many years ago he came out to Kansas with his son and and took up a homestead in Dickinson County, where he lived about eighteen years. He then removed to Wisconsin and afterwards to Illinois. Rev. J. W. Robb, father of William Wesley, had spent a large part of his life in Kansas, and was a participant in the pioneer activities in the western part of the state. He was born in 1851 in Mercer County, Illinois, grew up there, and when a young man went to Minnesota. He became a minister of the Presbyterian Church, and was married in Minnesota where he preached the gospel for several years. He was also pastor of a church in Illinois. It was in 1873 that he brought his family to Kansas and located in Dickinson...

Read More

Kickapoo Tribe

Kickapoo Indians, Kickapoo People (from Kiwǐgapawa, ‘he stands about,’ Or ‘he moves about, standing now here, now there’). A tribe of the central Algonquian group, forming a division with the Sauk and Foxes, with whom they have close ethnic and linguistic connection. The relation of this division is rather with the Miami, Shawnee, Menominee, and Peoria than with the Chippewa, Potawatomi, and Ottawa. Kickapoo Tribe History The people of this tribe, unless they are hidden under a name not yet known to be synonymous, first appear in history about 1667-70. At this time they were found by Allouez near the portage between Fox and Wisconsin rivers. Verwyst 1Verwyst, Missionary Labors, 1886 suggests Alloa, Columbia County, Wisconsin, as the probable locality, about 12 miles south of the mixed village of the Mascouten, Miami, and Wea. No tradition of their former home or previous wanderings has been recorded; but if the name Outitchakouk mentioned by Druillettes 2Jes. Rel. 1658, 21, 1858 refers to the Kickapoo, which seems probable, the first mention of them is carried back a few years, but they were then in the same locality. Le Sueur (1699) mentions, in his voyage up the Mississippi, the river of the Quincapous (Kickapoo), above the month of the Wisconsin, which he says was “so called from the name of a nation which formerly dwelt on its banks.” This probably refers to Kickapoo...

Read More

Columbia County, Wisconsin Cemetery Records

Wisconsin Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Wisconsin county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Columbia County, Wisconsin Cemetery Records Hosted at Columbia County USGenWeb Archives Project Dekorra Cemetery Hosted at Columbia County, Wisconsin WIGenWeb Arlington Evangelical United Brethren Cemetery Rubin/Guenther Cemetery Saint Camillus Novitiate Cemetery aka Durwards Glen Cemetery Saint Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Cemetery Hillside Cemetery Surnames A-O Surnames P-Z Dekorra Cemetery Hillside Cemetery Veterans Inch Cemetery Saint Marys Lost Lake Cemetery Surnames A-M Surnames N-Z Old Fort Winnebago Cemetery Union Soldier Burials Saint Mary’s Catholic Cemetery Union Soldier Burials State Rights Fountain Prairie Cemetery Greenwood Cemetery Leeds Center Cemetery Spring Prairie Hauge Cemetery Zion Evangelical Lutheran Cemetery Cummings Cemetery Greenwood Cemetery Oak Grove Cemetery – Oak Grove addendum Union Soldier Burials Silver Lake Cemetery Union Soldier Burials South Lowville Cemetery Ohio Cemetery Marcellon Cemetery Pacific Cemetery  Union Soldier Burials Randolph Public Cemetery Saint John’s Lutheran Cemetery Pleasant Hill/Inglehart Cemetery Portage Prairie Cemetery Rosedale Presbyterian Cemetery County Home Cemetery (Old Cemetery) Pardeeville Cemetery Rocky Run Catholic (St. Augustine’s) Cemetery Wyocena Cemetery Hosted at Interment.net Durward Family Cemetery Jerrison Cemetery McDonald Cemetery Rubin/Guenther Cemetery Hosted at USGenWeb Archives Project, Tombstone Photograph Pages Engedi Cemetery Marcellon Cemetery Rosedale Cemetery...

Read More

Biography of Hon. Orvin Kincaid

HON. ORVIN KINCAID. – Mr. Kincaid’s life has embodied very much of the rough romance of an untamed and mining country, and in its entirety would read like a tail of Arabia. He is a native of the granite state, having been born in Grafton, New Hampshire, in 1821. His father, a man of powerful physique, a blacksmith of Scotch-Irish parentage, gave him a training both at school and at the forge, and took the boy with him on his removals to Massachusetts and Vermont. Upon reaching his majority young Kincaid spent eighteen months in Ohio and the old West, but returned to Vermont for a few more years in school. In 1844, together with his father and a brother, he came to Wisconsin, establishing a blacksmith shop at Beloit, and three years later at Portage City, and finished his life in that state as a farmer at Otsego. In 1852 the great impulse that brought so many men to the Pacific seized him also; and joining a train of eighty wagons he journeyed steadily westward, performing an average of twenty-two and one-half miles per day over the old emigrant road. At Soda Springs, near Fort Hall, however, he found it necessary to dispose of his interest in the wagon to which he was attached. Taking a few crackers and dried beef as provisions, and one blanket, he continued...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest