Location: Coloma California

Indian Hostilities in California and New Mexico – Indian Wars

The Indian tribes of California are in a degraded and miserable condition. The most numerous are the Shoshonee, the Blackfeet, and the Crows. Many of them have been brought to a half civilized state, and are employed at the different ranches. But those in the neighborhood of the Sierra Nevada are untamable, treacherous, and ferocious. They wander about, for the most part going entirely naked, and subsisting upon roots, acorns, and pine cones. Since the discovery of the gold, they have acquired some knowledge of its usefulness, but no clear conception of its value, and they part with their...

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Biography of Joseph K. Vincent

More than thirty-seven years have passed since Judge Vincent arrived in Idaho, and he is justly numbered among her honored pioneers and leading citizens. He has been prominently identified with her business life, being connected with mining, agricultural and commercial interests, and although he has rounded the psalmist’s span of three-score years and ten, and although the snows of many winters have whitened his hair, he has the vigor of a much younger man, and in spirit and interest seems yet in his prime. Old age is not necessarily a synonym of weakness or inactivity. It needs not suggest, as a matter of course, want of occupation or helplessness. There is an old age that is a benediction to all- that comes in contact with it, that gives out of its rich stores of learning and experience, and which, in its active connection with the affairs of life, puts to shame many a younger man, who grows weary of the cares and struggles and would fain shift to other shoulders the burdens which he should carry. Of such an honored type Judge Vincent, now in the evening of life, is a representative. A native of New England, he was born in Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, June 26, 1822, and is of Welsh and English ancestors, who were early settlers of Salem. His grandmother, his father and he himself were...

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Biography of Thomas Guinean

THOMAS GUINEAN. – The proprietor of the Esmond Hotel, in Portland, Oregon, and one of the most popular men in his line upon the Pacific slope, was born in the city of Quebec, Canada, in 1838. In the year 1849 he was left an orphan and thrown upon his own responsibilities, and went down to Boston, but within a year left the old Puritan city and journeyed on to New York, where he took passage in the steamer California to San Francisco, arriving at the Golden Gate in the early part of 1852. He remained in San Francisco nearly one year, and from that point engaged in business at Sacramento. In 1855 he sought a new location at Coloma in El Dorado county, and leased the American Hotel at that place, which he ran until 1858. In the same year he returned to Sacramento and opened the Bank Exchange Oyster Saloon and Chop House and the Crescent City Hotel, which he sold out in 1859 and bought property on Second street one hundred to one hundred and sixty feet, and opened the Arcade Hotel, which he ran until 1865, when he tore down the original frame building and erected the present Arcade Hotel, a place which was celebrated in the history of California for nearly nineteen years as the headquarters of the supreme court and bar, and of the...

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Biography of John William Whalley

Whalley, John William, was born on the 28th of April, 1833. His ancestors on his father’s side had, for a long period, been yoemen residing at Dent in the West Reding of Yorkshire, England, who had migrated there from Norfolk, and belonged to the same family of which Edmund Whalley of the Cromwellian Army was a member. Many of the family held respectable positions, both in the church, the army and at the bar, the elder sons usually owning and managing the small estate of the family, the younger members making their living in some of the learned professions. On his mother’s side Mrs. Whalley’s “fore-elders,” as termed in Cheshire, were Welsh, and for more than 200 years occupied, under lease for that term, the estate of Overton Hall, owned by Lord Kenyon. This lease terminated in the life-time of Mr. William Jones, the grandfather of Mr. Whalley, who then with his family moved to Canada, and from thence to New York City, where he died and was buried in St. Paul’s churchyard on Broadway. Mr. Whalley’s father, Rev. Francis Whalley, left England under an appointment from the society for the propagation of the gospel in foreign parts and was stationed in Annapolis, Nova Scotia, where the subject of this sketch was born. In 1835 the family returned to England, the father becoming rector of Rivington Parish, Cheshire, but...

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