Location: Coffeeville Kansas

Biography of Thomas H. Smith

THOMAS H. SMITH. The prosperity of any locality depends almost solely upon the character of the people who inhabit it, and if the citizens are pushing, energetic and intelligent the country will prosper accordingly. Tennessee has given to Missouri many of her most progressive and prosperous citizens, prominent among whom is Thomas H. Smith, who is a product of Marion County, where he was born on August 7, 1850, a son of Ransom and Mary (Hendricks) Smith, the former of whom was born in Campbell County, April 7, 1820, and the latter in Marion County April 14, 1826, both of Tennessee. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now Ransom Smith was taken to Marion County by his father, Thomas Smith, when he was about four years of age, and still resides on the old home farm on which the father settled. The great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, Ransom Smith, was born in the Old North State and was a soldier of the Revolution. He was...

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Slave Narrative of Emma Barr

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Emma Barr Location: Madison, Arkansas Age: 65 Occupation: Nursed, Farmed “My parents belong to two people. Mama was born in Mississippi I think and papa come from North Carolina. Papa’s master was Lark Hickerson. Mama was sold from Dr. Ware to Dr. Pope. She was grown when she was sold. She was the mother of twenty-seven children. She had twins three times. “During the Civil War she was run from the Yankees and had twins on the road. They died or was born dead and she nearly died. They was buried between twin trees close to Hernando, Mississippi. Her last owner was Dr. Pope, ten miles south of Augusta, Arkansas. I was born there and raised up three miles south of Augusta, Arkansas. “When mama was sold she left her people in Mississippi but after freedom her sisters, Aunt Mariah and Aunt Mary, come here to mama. Aunt Mariah had no children. Aunt Mary had four boys, two girls. She brought her children. Mama said her husband when Dr. Ware owned her was Maxwell but she married my papa after Dr. Pope bought her. “Dr. Ware had a fine man he bred his colored house women to. They didn’t plough and do heavy work. He was hostler, looked after the stock and got in wood. The women hated him, and the men on...

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