Location: Clinton County PA

Biography of George A. Crawford

George A. Crawford, the founder of Fort Scott, a well known editor and public man and several times a gubernatorial candidate, was born in Clinton County, Pennsylvania, July 27, 1827, of Scotch-Irish-German stock. After recejving an aendemie education and graduating from Jefferson College, he taught school in Kentucky and Mississippi, when he returned to Pennsylvania to study law. While still reading for the bar, he became edjtor and proprietor of the Clinton Demoernt. During the early ’50s he took an active part in politics against the Know-Nothings and in 1855 was a delegate to the Pennsylvania Demeratie State Couvention. In the spring of 1857 he came to Kansas; landed at Leavenworth and accompanied Dr. Norman Eddy, United States commissioner for the sale of Indian lands, to Lawrence. Crawford, Eddy and other associates purchased 520 acres of land and organized the Fort Scott Town Company, of which Mr. Crawford was made president, a position he held for twenty years. A town was laid out and the streets were named after Mr. Crawford’s friends. He was opposed to the agitation kept up by the border factions but did not change his free-state views and several attempts were made to assassinate him. At the outbreak of the Civil War Mr. Crawford assisted in the organization of the Second Kansas Regiment and equipped many of its members. When the border was threatened he...

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Slave Narrative of John Anderson

Interviewer: Byers York Person Interviewed: John Anderson Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Clinton County PA A story resulting from an interview with John Anderson, an old Negro slave: “I was born in Pennsylvania, on Shiptown road, Clinton County, close to Mercersberg. When I was growing up my mammy always believed in making her own medicine, and doctored the whole family with the roots she dug herself. She use to bile down the roots from may-apple, snake root and blood root, and make her medicine. This was good for the blood and keep us from gettin’ sick. While the wah was goin’ on, the soldiers were campin’ all about us and when they heer’d the Gray’s was comin’ they got ready for battle, and when they did come they fit’ em back, and they made their stand at Harpers Ferry, Va., and had a hard battle there. My mammy was scared of the Gray’s and when she heer’d they was comin’, would hide us three boys in some white folks cellar until they was gone. They would take all the young niggahs with them they could get hold of, and soon as they’d gone, we would go back home. When the wah was over, me and some boys went over to the battlefield and foun’ a calvary gun which I had for years. We lived in a log cabin on...

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Biography of Rev. Joseph F. Lubeley

Rev. Joseph F. Lubeley, pastor of the Holy Trinity church at Fourteenth and Mallinckrodt streets in St. Louis, was born in Lockhaven, Pennsylvania, September 15, 1873, a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Selter) Lubeley, both of whom were natives of Germany, where they were reared and married. Immediately after that important event in their lives they sailed for the United States, taking up their abode at Lockhaven, Pennsylvania, where the father taught school and also served as organist in the church. In 1877 he came to St. Louis and was made teacher and organist in St. Liborius parish, with which he was connected to the time of his death in 1895. His widow survives and resides with a daughter on a farm in St. Charles county, Missouri. Joseph F. Lubeley of this review attended the St. Liborius school and afterward was a student in St. Francis College at Quincy, Illinois, there pursuing his college work and course in philosophy, remaining as a student in that institution for six years. He was then sent to Innsbruck, where he attended the Jesuit University for four years, and in 1895, not having reached the canonical age, he taught at St. Francis seminary in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for a year. On the 4th of July, 1896, he was ordained to the priesthood in St. Anthony’s church of St. Louis by Archbishop J. J. Kain....

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Biography of Barney W. Frauenthal

Barney W. Frauenthal, general traffic agent of the United Railways Company of St. Louis, was born in White Haven, Pennsylvania, February 27, 1869. He attended the public schools at White Haven and completed his education at the Central State Normal School at Lock Haven, Pennsylvania. In May, 1883, Mr. Frauenthal entered the service of the Union Depot Company in the telegraph department of the old Union depot at Twelfth and Poplar streets, where he was steadily promoted to higher responsibilities in the telegraph and ticket departments. In 1893 he accepted a position with the Wabash Western Railway Company in a capacity preparatory to fitting him for the information bureau of the St. Louis Union station, then in process of construction. On the opening of the Union station, September 2, 1894, he was given charge of the information bureau and under his unique direction it became the first successful organized bureau for the dissemination of general information in the world. On January 25, 1904, he was promoted to the position of general ticket agent of the Union station, comprising nineteen associated lines. On April 10, 1912, he was appointed general passenger and ticket agent of the Terminal Railroad Association, the St. Louis Merchants Bridge Company and The Wiggins Ferry Company. On September 25, 1919, he severed his connection with the steam railways and accepted an appointment by Rolla Wells as...

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Biographical Sketch of Herbert James Boggis

Boggis, Herbert James; mfr.; born, Lock Haven, Pa., March 22, 1862; son of Robert H. and Helen Taylor Boggis; educated, Yale, 1885; married, Philadelphia, Feb. 18, 1886, Sarah W. Parsons; issue, Mrs. R. H. Wright, Oct. 20, 1888, Henry P., May 21, 1895, Mildred, Feb. 9, 1900; began work with McIntosh-Huntington Co.; entered employ of the Taylor & Boggis Foundry Co. in 1886, be-coming sec ‘y of company in the fall of 1887; took charge of No. 2 foundry in 1890, and in 1910, upon death of Mr. Boggis, Sr., took charge of foundry; vice pres. the Taylor & Boggis Foundry Co.; member Delta Kappa Epsilon, Chamber of Commerce; pres. College...

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Biography of J. M. Massey

J. M. Massey. One of the live and prosperous communities of Southeastern Kansas which is offering unsurpassed opportunities for the development of men and large business interests is the growing City of Chanute. In this locality may be found many of the raw materials, or they can be easily obtained through railroad shipments. Here is an immense local market, and here are the men, solid, reliable and aggressive, ready and willing to push ahead to the ultimate end whatever enterprise they connect themselves with. Once an individual establishes himself in the line for which he is best fitted, if he possess business sense and acumen, it is certain that success of one or another kind will reward his efforts. One of the men of Chanute who had admirably proven his own worth and increased his value as a citizen by developing large interests, is J. M. Massey, junior member of the large clothing firm of Garvin & Massey, and vice president of the First National Bank. He had been a resident of Chanute since 1896 and during this time had steadily risen to a place of prominence through a recognition and ready grasp of the opportunities which have presented themselves. Mr. Massey was born at Lock Haven, Clinton County, Pennsylvania, May 25, 1843, and is a son of Dr. A. B. and Ann R. (McMeen) Massey, and a member...

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Biography of Illiam Francis Allison

Illiam Francis Allison was born September 7, 1847, in Lockhaven, Pennsylvania, and, like many men who achieve success in business or distinction in public life, his early years were passed on a farm, where are instilled habits of industry, and the seeds of a sturdy, selfreliant manhood are sown which ripen into true grandeur of character. Young Allison’s inclination being rather toward mercantile pursuits than agricultural, he left the farm and took a course in Commercial College at Poughkeepsie, New York. Though not of legal age, he exemplified his patriotism by enlisting in the Union army, and it was the hardships experienced in his country’s service that impaired his naturally frail constitution. After spending a few months in a drug store his health gave way, and he went west as far as Nebraska, seeking to improve it. There he engaged in a milling enterprise, which did not prove satisfactory, and he returned to Lockhaven and accepted a fine position tendered him with the firm of Hastings & Carson, manufacturing druggists in Philadelphia, on a salary of $1,600 a year. Soon after entering their employ, the step which determined his subsequent business career, he married Miss A. R. MacManigal, a friend of his childhood and youth. His health again failing, being attacked with hemorrhages of the lungs, he was compelled to resign his position much to the regret of his...

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Fort Horn, Clinton County, Pennsylvania

Fort Horn was erected on a high flat extending out to the river and commanding a good view of the river up and down, as well as the north side of the river; is about midway between Pine and McElhattan Stations on the P. & E. R. R., west of Fort Antes. It was a place of refuge for those hardy settlers on the Indian lands on the north side of the river, as well as the residents on the Pennsylvania lands on which it was built. The river lands on the north side were outside the purchase of 1768, from the Lycoming creek up the river westward. These settlers were adventurous, hardy, brave. When I say they were mostly Scotch-Irish it will be understood they were also law abiding. As they were outside the limits of the laws of the Province, they had formed a code of their own and administered it impartially. In troublous times now upon these communities they all stood shoulder to shoulder, proving the saying that blood is thicker than water. A few soldiers are said to have been stationed here and the settlers on both sides the river joined them in scouting duty, sending word to those below of approaching danger; several light skirmishes took place between the men of the fort and the Indians, in which several lives were lost. On an...

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Fort Reid at Lock Haven, Clinton County, Pennsylvania

Fort Reid was the most westerly of the line of defenses thrown out in advance of Fort Augusta, for the purpose of covering that place and as a rallying place for the inhabitants and the scouts when hard pressed. The Continental Army had drawn largely upon the young active men of the region, leaving those less ht for active service at home to cope with an enemy, the most active and wily in border warfare of this kind in the world. In this forest country, with the inhabitants isolated by the size of their land claims, he could lay in wait, concealed for weeks if necessary, to await an opportunity to strike the settler when off his guard or in a situation in which he could offer least effective opposition. Not hampered with baggage, never troubled about keeping open his communications, as he could glide through where a fox might pass, and as noiselessly; armed by his master with the best of arms the time afforded, while the pioneers could scarcely procure ammunition enough to keep his family in meat; the Indian was bountifully furnished from the ample storehouses of the English. One naturally wonders how, with all the disadvantages against him, the settler held out so long; his staying qualities were wonderful; with these strengthened houses inadequately garrisoned as the only refuge for his family, he was a...

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Clinton County, Pennsylvania Census Records

1790 Clinton County, Pennsylvania Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Clinton County, Pennsylvania Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Clinton County, Pennsylvania Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Clinton County, Pennsylvania Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1820 Clinton County, Pennsylvania Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Clinton County, Pennsylvania Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1830 Clinton County, Pennsylvania Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Clinton County, Pennsylvania Census Records Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1840 Clinton County, Pennsylvania Census Images $ Hosted at Pennsylvania USGenWeb Archives Pensioners for Revolutionary or Military Service Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Clinton County, Pennsylvania Census Records Hosted at Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1850 Clinton County, Pennsylvania Census Images $...

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Clinton County, Pennsylvania Cemetery Records

Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Cemeteries hosted at Clinton County Pennsylvania USGenWeb Archives Sunnyside Cemetery No. 1, Fairpoint Surnames A-E: Some Clinton County Cemeteries Surnames F-K: Some Clinton County Cemeteries Surnames L-R: Some Clinton County Cemeteries Surnames S-Z: Some Clinton County Cemeteries Nelsonville Cemetery (aka Rohn/Rhone), Keating Mountain Cemetery Photos Hosted at Clinton County Pennsylvania USGenWeb Archives Dunnstown Cemetery Cemeteries Hosted at Clinton County Pennsylvania Political Graveyard Cemeteries Hosted at Interment Dunnstown Cemetery Noyes Cemetery Cemeteries Hosted at Pennsylvania Find a Grave Baptist Cemetery Bellevue Cemetery Beth Yehuda Cemetery Brown Cemetery Caldwell Cemetery Caldwell Family Cemetery Cedar Hill Cemetery Christian Cemetery, Blanchard Church of Brethren Cemetery Clark Cemetery Crider Cemetery Disciples Cemetery Dunnstown Cemetery East End Amish Cemetery Esher Cemetery Fairview Cemetery Flemington Cemetery Ganoe Cemetery Garman Lutheran Cemetery Green Grove Cemetery Grugan Cemetery Halls Run Cemetery Hammersley Fork Cemetery Hays-Fearon Cemetery Highland Cemetery Hyner Cemetery Kepler Cemetery Laurel Hill Cemetery Linnwood Cemetery Lutheran Cemetery Lutheran Cemetery Maple Grove McCloskey Cemetery McCoy Cemetery McIntyre Cemetery Methodist Episcopal Cemetery Mount Bethel United Church of Christ Mount Pleasant Cemetery Mount Union Cemetery Nelson Cemetery New Maple Grove Cemetery North Bend Cemetery Noyes Cemetery Old Schracktown Cemetery Price Cemetery Quiggle Cemetery Reformed Cemetery Rest Haven Memorial Park Rest Haven Memorial Park...

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Biographical Sketch of William Harris Welch

William Harris Welch was born at Erie, Pennsylvania, December 15, 1862. He moved from there to Lock Haven with his parents the following year, and was educated in private and public schools, finishing with a special one year’s course in the State Normal at that place in 187980. During the next five years he studied and practiced civil engineering with his father, Edwin H. Welch, on the Pennsylvania railroad. In February, 1885, he entered the maintenance of way department of the Northern Central railway at Elmira as rodman. In June of the same year he came to Canandaigua as assistant to Supervisor William J. Jeudevine. At the death of the latter in 1891 he was appointed supervisor of the Canandaigua division, which position he still holds. For a number of years he acted as village engineer, building a number of the village sewers, and in 1899 the Chapin street brick pavement, the first laid in the village. He is on his father’s side a direct descendant of William Bradford, who came over in the “Mayflower” in 1620, and Alice Carpenter, his wife. His father is still living and is practicing his profession in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania. His mother died in September, 1893. A sister, L. Helen Welch, and a brother, Paul H. Welch, are still living at the old home. On October 10, 1888, William H. Welch married Grace,...

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Biography of George W. Staver

George W. Staver, president and founder of one of the largest mercantile corporations on the Pacific Coast was born in Brush Valley, Center county, Pennsylvania, November 18, 1836. He is of German and Scotch-Irish ancestry and was reared upon a farm. Soon after his birth his parents moved to Sugar Valley, Clinton county, Pennsylvania, and remained on the same farm until 1854, when they came ‘to Illinois, but a year later settled near Monroe, Green county, Wisconsin. Here his father, Frederick Staver, still resides, at the advanced age of eighty-one years. Our subject received from his father a most thorough knowledge of farming in all its branches, long before the era of the present improved farming implements. His education was such as was received at that day in Pennsylvania, Illinois and Wisconsin by the average farmer’s boy. Attendance at the district school in winter with three months at the Academy at Warren, Illinois, in 1861, completed his educational advantages; previous to going to the latter institution, however, he taught school for two terms in Green county. He early became interested in and an expert operator of agricultural machinery. He purchased one of the first threshing machines used in Green county, and during the fall and winter followed threshing. He became very proficient in this line of work and before he had reached his majority did quite an extensive business....

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