Location: Clarksville Oklahoma

Slave Narrative of Mary Grayson

Person Interviewed: Mary Grayson Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 83 I am what we colored people call a “native.” That means that I didn’t come into the Indian country from somewhere in the Old South, after the war, like so many Negroes did, but I was born here in the old Creek Nation, and my master was a Creek Indian. That was eighty three years ago, so I am told. My mammy belonged to white people back in Alabama when she was born, down in the southern part I think, for she told me that after she was a sizeable girl her white people moved into the eastern part of Alabama where there was a lot of Creeks. Some of them Creeks was mixed up with the whites, and some of the big men in the Creeks who come to talk to her master was almost white, it looked like. “My white folks moved around a lot when I was a little girl”, she told me. When mammy was about 10 or 12 years old some of the Creeks begun to come out to the Territory in little bunches. They wasn’t the ones who was taken out here by the soldiers and contractor men, they come on ahead by themselves and most of them had plenty of money, too. A Creek come to my mammy’s master and bought her to...

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Biography of John W. Capps

Among the leading financial institutions of Muskogee county is numbered the Haskell National Bank, of which John W. Capps is the president, and the successful conduct of the enterprise is largely due to his well formulated and promptly execute plans and marked business ability. He was born in Madison county, Arkansas, June 15, 1880, and is a son of James R. and Louisa (King) Capps, the former a native of Missouri and the latter of Texas. For four years the father cultivated a farm in Arkansas and in 1888 removed to Texas, where he purchased land which he continued to improve and develop until 1894, when he came to Oklahoma, settling near Choska. There he was engaged in farming and stock raising until 1900, when he retired from active business life and continued to make his home with his children until his demise, which occurred September 6, 1920, while the mother had passed away on the 6th of January, 1916. In the acquirement of an education John W. Capps attended the public schools of Texas and Oklahoma and remained at home until he reached the age of eighteen, when he engaged in the grocery business at Clarksville, in what was then known as Indian Territory, continuing active along that line until 1903. In that year he opened the First State Bank of Clarksville, which he conducted at that place until 1908,...

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