Location: Circleville Ohio

Biography of Hon. Thomas J. Roth

Hon. Thomas J. Roth. Since 1906 the legal profession of Champaign County has been capably and honorably represented at Urbana by Hon. Thomas J. Roth, former judge of the County Court and a legist of the county for forty-three years. For the greater part of this period Judge Roth was located at Rantoul, but came to Urbana to assume the duties of his judicial office, and upon the expiration of his term remained at the county seat in the enjoyment of a constantly increasing practice. Hon. Thomas J. Roth was born at Circleville, Pickaway County, Ohio, December 3, 1846. and is a son of Thomas B. and Esther (Ghrist) Roth. His paternal grandfather was a native of Holland who immigrated to the United States as a young man and located with his wife in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Thomas B. Roth, however, was born in Shamokin, Pennsylvania. Mr. Roth’s mother’s maternal grandfather, Charles R. Morris, was born in Maryland and his wife in New Jersey, and Mr. Roth’s maternal grandparents, Jonathan and Mary (Morris) Ghrist, were both natives of Maryland, from which it will be seen that on the maternal side Mr. Roth’s ancestry is distinctively American for several generations. As a young man Thomas B. Roth removed to Pickaway County, Ohio, where he lived for a number of years, but in 1856 removed to a farm near Oakland, Coles...

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Biography of Charles B. Wiggins

Charles B. Wiggins. So indispensable has the automobile become to modern life that one is led to marvel that such great progress in manufacture and use could have been made in comparatively so short a time. Although the idea of self-propelled vehicles was entertained and to some extent proved possible long before 1886, when the first horseless carriage as a practical conveyance appeared on the boulevards of Paris, France, it presented so many impossible features that for years the venture was not regarded as feasible. When other motive power than steam became known to the industries, it required only the application of inventive minds to evolve the automobile, a rather crude affair even in the summer of 1898, when in the entire United States there were only eighty of these new vehicles. In comparison with the present the record is astounding, not only in the volume of automobile output, but in the improvements that each year adds to the utility, beauty, use and comfort of this wonderful invention. With the increased use of the automobile dawned a new prosperity in every land, business methods have been revolutionized, agriculture is carried on along new lines, social life has been pleasantly stimulated and even war is prosecuted with unheard of vigor because of automobile inventions. Thousands of far-seeing business men find profit in handling one or another of the special type...

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Biography of Jessie K. Clarke, M. D.

In no field of endeavor requiring intellectuality has woman failed to demonstrate her equality with man, and more and more the different lines of professional labor are opening to her, and therein she is winning successes that are most creditable. Dr. Jessie K. Clarke, although a recent acquisition to the medical fraternity of Grangeville, has already demonstrated her right to be classed among the foremost physicians of Idaho County, and her ability is indicated by the liberal patronage she now enjoys. She makes a specialty of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, and her labors have been attended by most gratifying results to patient and practitioner. Dr. Clarke is a native of Ohio, her birth having occurred in Circleville, June 1, 1861. She is of English lineage on the paternal side and of Scotch descent on the maternal, her mother’s people tracing their ancestry back to Sir William Wallace, one of the greatest heroes and patriots that his land has ever produced. The Clarkes have for generations been residents of New York. To this family belongs Dr. Elisha Clarke, a grand-uncle of the lady of whom we write. Her father, William A. Clarke, was a native of Albany, New York, was a farmer by occupation, and religiously was connected with the United Brethren church. He married Miss Sarah M. Cleveland, and to them were born eight children,...

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Biography of George H. Hunter

George H. Hunter, a resident of Wellington almost forty years, is one of the leading millers of the state, is president of the oldest bank in Wellington, and has also given much of his time and energies to public affairs, being the present mayor of Wellington. He was born on a farm near Circleville, Ohio, December 1, 1849, one of the five children of Alexander M. and Sophia (Zepp) Hunter, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. Sophia Zepp was of Pennsylvania Dutch extraction, and when a child was brought to Ohio by her uncle and aunt. Alexander M. Hunter enlisted at the outbreak of the Civil war, but on account of physical disability was not accepted for service. He was a republican and a member of the Congregational Church. He came out to Wellington, was associated with his son in the flour mill from 1879 until 1910, and one day while fishing on a railway bridge was killed by a train, being then nearly ninety years of age. When George H. Hunter was six months of age his parents moved to a farm in Shelby County, Illinois. He had only the advantages of the district schools and his higher education was gained largely through his own efforts and by paying his own expenses through the State Normal University at Normal, Illinois. At the age...

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Biography of Hon. Horace S. Clark

Hon. Horace S. Clark, attorney at law, Mattoon; was born in Huntsburg, Geauga Co., Ohio, Aug. 12, 1840; his father emigrated to Ohio from Vermont at an early day; at the age of 15 years, with a fair education, he left the old homestead and came West to Chicago, where he sought employment and labored a short time; he soon left the city and going to Kane Co., engaged in farm work during the summer and attended school during the winter season, paying his way by manual labor before and after school-hours; in the spring of 1856, he reached Iowa City, and made his home with an older brother while pursuing a student life in Iowa State University; here he soon became a leader among his fellow-students as an orator and debater; during vacations, he engaged in teaching school, and in the law office of Justice William E. Miller; read with attention and profit the works of Blackstone and various other treatises on law during the first year of his residence in Iowa City; he returned to Kane Co., purchased ten cows, shipped them by rail to the city, and from the proceeds of the milk, pailed by his own hands, defrayed his current expenses; in the spring of 1858, with a capital of $200, he speculated in fruit-trees, but failed to secure profitable returns; subsequently he went to...

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Logan Elm And Monument, Circleville, Ohio

Logan, Chief of the Mingoes, was a Cayuga Indian, born at Auburn, New York in 1726. He was the son of Chief Shikellamy, deputy of the Six Nations over the Indians at a section of Pennsylvania. Like his father, Logan was a firm friend of the white man. Upon moving to Ohio, Logan was made chief of the mingoes. During the year 1774 a band of adventurers and “land grabbers” under the leadership of a Captain Michael Cresap and Daniel Greathouse, who were encouraged by a Dr. John Connolly, said to have been under the hire of Governor Dunmore, of Virginia, declared war on all Indians. Dunmore wished an Indian war as an excuse to drive the Shawnees and other Indians from their lands which Dunmore and the rest of the Virginian land speculators coveted. These border ruffians first killed two unsuspecting Indians who were traveling down the Ohio River with some traders. They then attacked and killed some other peaceful Indians who were camped on Cantina Creek. After these murders had been completed, the Virginians marched to Yellow Creek where they knew Logan’s family were living. At dawn, April 30th, the white men entered the Indian camp. They invited the Indians to go to a tavern nearby, promising them rum. Logan, at the time was away on a hunting trip. The Indians accepted the invitation. At the tavern...

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