Location: Chillicothe Ohio

The War with the Indians of the West during Washington’s Administration

After the termination of the Revolutionary War, the hardy settlers of the west had still a contest to maintain, which often threatened their extermination. The Indian tribes of the west refused to bury the hatchet when Great Britain withdrew her armies, and they continued their terrible devastation. The vicinity of the Ohio River, especially, was the scene of their operations.

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Biography of W. D. McDonald

W. D. McDonald was born in Ross county, Ohio, August 6, 1826. His parents, William and Mary McDonald, were both natives of Virginia. His mother was a daughter of Nathaniel Wilson who was the first State printer of Ohio, and a sister of the late Nathaniel Wilson, who with his father started the Scioto Gazette in 1800, in Scioto county, one of the first papers of Ohio. Mr. Wilson died a few years ago at the age of ninety-two years-the oldest editor then in America. Our subject was five years old when his father died and he was reared by Ex-Governor McArthur, of Ohio, and educated in the select schools of Chillicothe, Ohio. After he quit school he dealt in cattle, driving them to the eastern markets, and continued that business for about seven years. He then engaged at farming which has been his avocation since. In 1854 he settled in Peoria county, Illinois, and in 1856 came to this county. In July, 1862, he enlisted in the Thirty-third Enrolled State Militia and at the organization was appointed adjutant, and soon after was appointed by the governor commissary of exemption, which place he filled for one year, was then appointed acting adjutant general for Colonel Williams, commanding this district, with headquarters at St. Joseph, and held that position under the following officers as they came in command of the...

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Through Ohio And Kentucky

Sunday, Oct. 18.–Myself and friend proceeded on our journey. We arrived at Siers, a distance of thirty miles, at dusk, much relieved by the change from our horses to the wagon. The roads were muddy, the weather drizzly and the country hilly. Buildings indifferent. The land very fertile and black. Trees uncommonly tall. Passed the little village of Cadis. In this country a tavern, a store, a smith shop and two or three cabins make a town. Passed ten or fifteen travelers. Great contrast between the quality of the land from Chambersburg to Pittsburg, and that which we have already traveled over from Steubenville in Ohio. Monday, Oct. 19.–Left Siers at 6 o’clock a. m. The morning fair and cold. Roads extremely rough. Country fertile, but hilly. Log cabins, ugly women and tall timber. Passed a little flourishing village called Freeport, settled by foreigners. Yankee Quakers and mechanics. Remarkable, with two taverns in the village, there was nothing fit to drink, not even good water. The corn fields in the woods among dead trees and the corn very fine. We arrived at Adairs, a distance of twenty-seven miles, at 6 o’clock p. m. Passed some peddlers and a few travelers. Value of land from Steubenville to Adairs from $2 to $30 per acre. Lots in Freeport, eighteen months old, from $30 to $100. This day being Monday and the...

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Biography of Edward R. Ames

Edward R. Ames, third son of Silvanus Ames, was born in Ames township, May 2o, 1806, on the farm now owned by James and George Henry. His early education, though limited, was healthful and solid, and, while still a youth, having access to the local library in Amesville, he formed a taste for reading that has largely influenced the conduct of his life. At the age of twenty he left his father’s farm to attend the Ohio university at Athens, where he remained some two or three years, mainly supporting himself, meanwhile, by teaching and other chance employments. While at college he became a member of the Methodist church. In the autumn of 1828 the late Bishop Roberts presided over the Ohio conference of the Methodist church, which was held at Chillicothe. To see their manner of doing business, and to obtain some knowledge as to the growth of the church, the young collegian attended the session. Bishop Roberts, who had a rare discernment of men, saw the youth and that there was something more than ordinary in him. The result of their acquaintance was, that, acting on the advice of the bishop to “go west,” young Ames accompanied him a few weeks later to the Illinois conference, held that year in Madison, Indiana. Here he made further acquaintance with active Methodists from the western states, and, at their...

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Biography of Warren S. Plummer

Warren S. Plummer, former county clerk of Pottawatomie County, is secretary, treasurer and manager of the Westmoreland Mercantile Company, the largest general merchandise house in business at the county seat. Mr. Plummer started life with an earnest purpose, and had steadily kept that in view and by industry and honorable dealings had attained a position where he is recognized as one of the leading men of his home county. He is a native of Pottawatomie County, having been born near the present Village of Flush, then known as Myers Valley, on January 7, 1875. He is of old American stock, the Plummers having come from England and settled in Virginia in Colonial times. His father Hezekiah Plummer was one of the early settlers in Pottawatomie County. He was born near Chillicothe, Ohio, in February, 1826, and when a boy entered upon an apprenticeship at the cooper and wagon making trade. He became a skilled workman. He was reared and married near Chillicothe and from there moved to Indiana. In 1862 he volunteered his services in Company I of the Thirtieth, Indiana Infantry, but after six months of service was discharged on account of disability. He then went back to Chillicothe, Ohio, and lived there until 1868, which was the date of his coming to Pottawatomie County. He took up a homestead, developed it as a farm, and sold out...

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Biography of Presley M. Bruner

A prominent practitioner at the bar of Hailey, and ex-district attorney of Alturas (now Blaine) County, Idaho, Presley Morris Bruner, was born in Chillicothe, Ohio. September 15, 1850. On the paternal side is of German lineage, and on the maternal of Scotch descent. His father, J. A. Bruner, was born in Virginia, a representative of one of the old and prominent families of that state, living in the Blue mountain region. He married Miss Margaret Morris, a daughter of Judge Presley Morris, of Chillicothe, Ohio. Her father was a descendant of the McDonald clan of the highlands of Scotland, and traced his ancestry back to Mary, Queen of Scots. Mr. Bruner’s father was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, and devoted fifty-six years of his life to spreading the gospel of peace on earth, good will to men. He removed to California in 1856, going by way of the isthmus, and spent the remainder of his days as a member of the California conference. He was a man of scholarly attainments, of marked ability in his chosen calling, a persuasive speaker and a power for good among men. He departed this life in 1892, at the age of seventy years, and his wife passed away three years previously, at the age of sixty-nine. She was to him a most faithful helpmeet, ably assisting him in his work, and...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Samuel McWilliams

McWilliams, Thomas Samuel; minister; born, Kentucky, Nov. 22, 1865; son of Samuel and Martha A. Harrington McWilliams; Centr. College, Danville, Ky., A. B., 1886, A. M., 1889, D. D., 1899; Danville Theological Seminary, 1886-1888; Princeton Theological Seminary, 1888-1889; married, Chillicothe, O., Dec. 5, 1887, Susan Probasco Nipgen; one son, John P. McWilliams; pastor First Presbyterian Church, Chillicothe, 0., 1889-1892; American Presbyterian Church, Montreal, Can., 1892-1902; pastor Calvary Presbyterian Church, Cleveland, since 1902; in 1911, chairman of committee that formed the Association of Federated Churches of Cleveland; pres. of Cleveland Peace Society, 1911, member Kappa Alpha Fraternity; member Mayfield, and Country Clubs. Golf favorite...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles E. Leitch

Charles E. Leitch, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Charleston; owns 117 acres; was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, April 16, 1836; resided with his parents on the farm until 22 years of age. He was married to Mahalia Baker March 18, 1858; she was born in Highland Co., Va., Dec. 19, 1837. Mr. Leitch has seven children living and two dead; the names of the living are Lizzie, Grant, John, Charles E., Jacob, Samuel and Allen; the deceased were two infants. Mr. Leitch has held the office of School Director ten years; he now holds the offices of School Trustee and Road Commissioner. Mr. Leitch’s father was Captain of a company of State militia in this county in an early...

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Biography of George W. Prescott

George W. Prescott, of San Bernardino, Master Mechanic of the Southern California Railroad, and one of the most expert mechanical engineers in this country, was born in New Hampshire fifty-one years ago. At the early age of seven years he was left without father or mother, and at thirteen he left his native State and started out to fight the battle of life alone and unaided. Going west as far as Ohio, he spent the next-five years in the old city of Chillicothe, where, following the natural bent of his mind, he studied the business of machinist, and when just past his eighteenth birthday he took charge of a locomotive engine. In 1856 he went to Columbus, Kentucky, and commenced building the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. On January 15, 1857, he unloaded from the steamer J. C. Swan the first locomotive engine that ever passed over that road, and set it up and run it aver the line. He put up all the engines and cars for that road till the spring of 1861. On May 3, of that year, the war of the Rebellion having broken out, and Mr. Prescott New England blood and patriotism allying him to the cause of the Union, he resigned his position and went North, notwithstanding he was offered $500 a month by the Superintendent of the Mobile & Ohio Railroad if he...

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Biography of William Henry Robinson, M. D.

William Henry Robinson, M. D. The value of an individual life is often expressed not so much through its positive services of a routine nature, but in its attitude toward those ideals and things which are still objects to be realized in that particular community. Such had been the distinctive role played by Dr. W. H. Robinson at Eudora, in addition to the splendid work he had performed through his profession. Doctor Robinson first came to Kansas in 1872, when a young man, and had spent most of his active career in this state. He was born at one of the first centers of civilization in the old Northwest Territory, at Chillicothe, Ohio, May 17, 1848. His Robinson ancestors came originally from England but have been Americans for many generations. Some of the family fought in the Revolutionary war, the War of 1812, and in the Mexican and Civil wars. Doctor Robinson’s brother Solomon S. was brevetted a major during the Civil war for building a pontoon bridge across the Potomac River. Another, John H. Robinson, was captain of a company in an Illinois Regiment in the same war, subsequently became a noted lawyer and was elected a judge at Cairo, Illinois. Doctor Robinson’s father was a merchant at Chillicothe and was also identified with the packing industry there in the early days. He married Katy Hutt, whose father,...

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