Location: Chicago Illinois

Descendants of William Swift of Sandwich, MA

William Swift, the founder of the family on Cape Cod, was a native of Bocking, County of Essex, England, and came to New England in 1634, stopping first at Watertown, of which he was a proprietor in 1636. He sold his property there in 1637 and removed to Sandwich, where he spent the remainder of his life and where he died about 1641. His wife Joan bore him two children, William and Hannah, and after the death of her husband she married Daniel Wing, Nov. 5, 1642. She died Jan. 31, 1664.

William Swift (2), son of William, born in England, came to the New World with his parents and settled at Sandwich, Barnstable county. He represented his town in the General Court, 1673, 1674, 1677 and 1678. He died in the latter part of 1705.

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Ancestors of Horace Alden Keith of Brockton, MA

Horace Alden Keith, founder of the Brockton Webbing Company, one of the successful and thriving industries of Brockton, and one of that city’s enterprising and progressive business men, is a descendant on both his paternal and maternal sides of historic old New England ancestry. Mr. Keith was born in West Bridgewater May 25, 1862, eldest son of the late Henry Snell and Thalia (Alden) Keith. The ancestral line of the branch of the Keith family in this country to which Horace Alden Keith belongs, and which follows, is given in chronological order from the first American ancestor. Rev. James Keith, born in 1644, was educated in Aberdeen, Scotland (as tradition says at the expense of a maiden aunt), where he was graduated likely from Marischal College, his name appearing on the roll of 1657, said college having been founded by George, the fifth Earl of Keith Marischal, in 1593. At the age of eighteen years he emigrated to this country, arriving at Boston in 1662. He was introduced to the church at Bridgewater by Dr. Increase Mather, and became settled as the minister of the Bridgewater Church Feb. 18, 1664. Rev. James Keith passed away in West Bridgewater July 23, 1719, aged seventy-six years, having labored in the ministry of the town for fifty-six years.

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Keller, Anna Mueller – Obituary

Anna Keller (nee Mueller), beloved wife of the late George Keller, fond mother of Joseph, Anna, Edward, Richard, George, and Mrs. Kripner; sister of the late Jacob Mueller, sister-in-law of John Keller.  Funeral Tuesday, November 22, 1927 at 10 a.m. from her late residence 4501 N. Longdale to our Lady of Victory Church.  Interment at Joseph Cemetery.  Seattle Washington papers please copy.  1Anna’s son Joseph lived in Seattle.  Anna died November 18, 1927. Chicago Tribune, November 20, 1927 Contributed by:  Shelli Steedman Footnotes:   [ + ] 1. ↩ Anna’s son Joseph lived in Seattle.  Anna died November 18,...

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Ellithorpe, Erie – Obituary

Erie E. Ellithorpe, at his residence, 6122 Prairie Ave.  Funeral Friday, March 12 [1915] at 2:30.  Interment at Mount Hope.  [Erie was survived by his wife Lillian Pegg] Contributed by:  Shelli...

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Coughlan, Lois M. Keller – Obituary

Lois M. Coughlan, 72, of Arlington Heights was a clinical nutritionist for the past 50 years, most recently working a as a renal dietitian at Total Renal Care Inc., Chicago, since 1995.  Mrs. Coughlan was previously a nutritionist at Lutheran General Hospital, Park Ridge, since the 1970s and at Resurrection Medical Center in Chicago from the early 1960s to the 1970s. Mrs. Coughlan, a Chicago native, died Monday, April 10, in her home.  In 1949 Mrs. Coughlan received a bachelor’s degree in dietetics at College of St. Teresa, Winona, Minn.  She completed an internship in dietetics at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit in 1950. Mrs. Coughlan was a volunteer with the Care and Courage Ministry at St. James Catholic Church in Arlington Heights, where she had previously been a volunteer for Public Action to Deliver Shelter, a ministry that provides temporary shelter for homeless people.  Karen Grunschel, a former colleague in the nutrition department at Lutheran General, said:  “She received a certificate of recognition from the American Dietetic Association in March for 50 years of membership.  She was a nice person.  She was easy to get along with.” Survivors include four sons, John A., Dan R., Tom D., and Bill R.; two daughters, Julie A. Coughlan-Homes Longman and Mary E.; a sister, Eileen Zannini; and five grandchildren.  Visitation will be from 3 to 9 p.m. Wednesday in Glueckert Funeral...

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Chandler Family of Boston and East Bridgewater MA

This Boston – East Bridgewater Chandler family, the head of which was the late Hon. Peleg Whitman Chandler, long one of the leading counselors of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and one of a family of lawyers, comes of a Massachusetts-Maine branch of the ancient Duxbury family whose progenitor was Edmund Chandler. The branch just alluded to for several generations at New Gloucester and Bangor, Maine, and at Boston in this Commonwealth, has been one of liberal education, college-bred men, men who have adorned the legal profession, and it has allied itself through generations with a number of the ancient and first families of the Old Colony. There follows in chronological order from Edmund Chandler, the first American ancestor of this branch of American Chandlers, and in detail the family history and genealogy.

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The Kribs Family of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

The best teacher, it is said, is experience. C. J. Kribs, circuit clerk of Randolph County, has had varied experiences. He was born February 19, 1867, in Belleville, Illinois. He attended the parochial and public schools, after which he learned the trade of harness maker in St. Louis. After a residence of five years in this city he went to Chicago and worked for four years as assistant store-keeper in the Illinois Steel Works. Then he went to Prairie du Rocher, and after a short stay went to St. Louis, working for the Metropolitan Insurance Co. He was promoted...

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The Brickey House of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

Nearly every town has an old house with an interesting story. Prairie du Rocher has several, one of which was the Brickey house. Unoccupied for many years, this large three-story, square-framed house with its wide porches, stained glass, shuttered windows, and mansard roof attracted the attention of the most casual visitor to the village. It stood among large trees of a generous plot of ground below the bluff, it silently proclaimed the hospitality that once was known there. The fine iron fence that enclosed the grounds emphasized its air of detachment.

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Charles Montezuma

There always have existed among the North American Indians, and still exist, many examples of intellectual ability, of genius, of high moral feeling and as noble and pure patriotism as was ever found in any nation of people and as proof of this fact I relate the following: Some twenty-five years ago a photographer of Chicago, being in Arizona on a vacation trip, found and rescued from an Apache camp an abandoned Indian male infant of full blood. The photographer became possessed with a desire to take the boy home with him and adopt him. In spite of warnings that the child would prove a viper in his bosom, he carried out his intentions, and reared the boy, to whom the name of Charles Montezuma was given, as a member of his family. The young Apache grew up to being face and physique the very type of his tribe; but he was at the same time an excellent scholar and a perfect gentleman. He graduated at the Chicago High School with credit, and was very popular in his class, being gentle, polite, and industrious. A recent inquiry as to Montezuma’s career since the completion of his high school education developed the facts that he has selected surgery for a profession, and will graduate from the Chicago Medical College far above the average of his class; that he is liked by...

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The Illinois Indians – Indian Wars

Some years ago there was deposited in the Archives of the “Historical Society” of Chicago a record in reference to the history of the Illinois Indians, a portion of which is interesting as connected with this matter. It was deposited by Judge Caton, who became a citizen of Chicago thirty-nine years ago, when the whole country was occupied as the hunting grounds of the Pottowattomie tribe. Their chief, Shabboni, died in 1849, the only remnant of this once powerful tribe. Of him it could be truth-fully said he was the last of his race. Comparatively not long since the surrounding country was mainly occupied by the Illinois tribe, an important people, ranging from the Wabash River to the Mississippi, and from the Ohio to Lake Superior. They lived mostly in Northern Illinois, centering in La Salle County. Then near Utica stood the largest town ever constructed by Northern Indians, and their great cemeteries attest the extent of the populous hordes of Indians who roamed the forests and prairies at will. La Salle, the Pioneer, discovered them before the great Iroquois Confederation had reached them, after their battle-fields had strewn their victims all along from the Atlantic Coast to the Wabash and from the lakes, and even north of them to the Alleghanies and the Ohio. The Iroquois or Six Nations, with a great slaughter, defeated this hitherto invincible people,...

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Black Hawk’s War – Indian Wars

We have now to record the events of a war “which brought one of the noblest of Indians to the notice and admiration of the people of the United States. Black Hawk was an able and patriotic chief. With the intelligence and power to plan a great project, and to execute it, he united the lofty spirit which secures the respect and confidence of a people. He was born about the year 1767, on Rock river, Illinois. At the age of fifteen he took a scalp from the enemy, and was in consequence promoted by his tribe to the...

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Mary Victoria Leiter, Baroness Curzon of Kedleston

For the second time within the century an American woman has risen to viceregal honors. Mary Caton, the granddaughter of Charles Carroll of Carrollton and the widow of Robert Patterson, of Baltimore, through her marriage, in 1825, to the Marquis of Wellesley, who was at the time Viceroy of Ireland, went to reign a queen in the country whence her ancestors, more than a century before, had emigrated to America. In Mary Victoria Leiter, whose life, to the people of a future generation, will read much like romance, we again behold an American woman, who, like the Marchioness of...

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Biography of Frank T. Vaughan

Frank T. Vaughan, one of the younger lawyers of Newport, was born May 4, 1864, in Woodstock, Vt., son of Edwin and Elizabeth L. (Tenney) Vaughan. The father, who graduated at the Albany Law School, New York, followed the legal profession, and at the time of his death was Judge of Probate. Edwin Vaughan commenced his law practice in New York City; but in 1859 he removed to Claremont, N.H., and entered into partnership with Colonel Alexander Gardner. In 1861 he enlisted in the New Hampshire Battalion of the First Rhode Island Volunteer Cavalry, and was afterward transferred to the First New Hampshire Cavalry, with the rank of Captain. He remained in the service throughout the late war, acting at one time as Provost Marshal. Claremont, and was thereafter engaged in his profession until 1869. In that year he was appointed United States Consul to Canada, a post which he efficiently filled for twelve years. Upon his return to Claremont he was made Judge of Probate, and he afterward served as Representative to the State legislature. He was largely interested in educational matters, was liberal in religion, and he was a member in good standing of the A. F. & A. M. He died December 18, 1890. He and his wife had three children. One died in infancy; and Charles Edwin died at the age of twelve years, from...

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Biographical Sketch of George H. Wallace

G. W. Wallace, hotel owner and city trustee of South San Francisco, has been a resident of California for eighteen years; and all of that time he has spent in San Mateo County. Mr. Wallace was born in Chicago on November 22, 1873 and he spent the early part of his life in the Windy City. He had a very responsible position with the firm of Oppenheim, Case & Co., a big butcher supply house. It was while he was representing this house that he was sent out to South San Francisco. Although this was eighteen years ago when South San Francisco was but a settlement and the Bay Shore Cutoff was not even projected, Mr. Wallace quickly grasped the situation and saw the brilliant future that was in store for the city. He immediately sold out his Chicago interests and located in South San Francisco. Since coming here Mr. Wallace has been one of South San Francisco’s staunchest citizens. Besides co-operating in all civic movements, Mr. Wallace has shown his faith in the city by investing in property and establishing property interests. His intimate association with the affairs of the city brought about his election as city trustee, in which capacity he now officiates. Mr. Wallace is a member of the San Mateo County Development Association and one of the leading spirits in the Chamber of Commerce of...

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Biographical Sketch of Jesse O. Snyder

In charge of the great plant of the Western Meat Company at South San Francisco which employs hundreds of men and turns out thousands of dollars worth of products monthly, is Jesse O. Snyder, a resident of South San Francisco for the past twenty years or more and one of its leading boosters. Mr. Snyder is a native of Pennsylvania and it was in Chicago that he gained his fundamental knowledge of the packing business. Before coming west he was with Swift & Co. He worked himself up to a responsible position with these interests who sent him out to take charge of the plant of the Western Meat Co. As general Superintendent of the Western Meat Company Mr. Snyder holds one of the most important positions in the industrial life of San Mateo County. The great institution which he superintends on the bay front is the largest packing plant on the whole Pacific coast. Besides his work with the Western Meat Company Mr. Snyder is well known for his interest in the affairs of South San Francisco and his part in its development. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and a director of the Bank of South San Francisco which has been the city’s most progressive influence. Jesse O. Snyder was born in Alexander, Pennsylvania, in the month of February, 1876. He spent nearly all...

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