Location: Chesterfield County VA

Biographical Sketch of E. J. Phillips

E. J. Phillips was born in Chesterfield county, Virginia, May 18, 1831. His parents, Edward and Elizabeth Phillips, were also natives of Virginia. The subject of our sketch learned the carpenter’s trade when he was twenty-one years old, and was employed in that business for seven years; next worked as a millwright for a few years, then began farming, which has been his occupation ever since. In 1852 he came to Missouri and settled in Platte county, and in 1877 came to this county, and now owns a fine farm of 200 acres. Mr. Phillips was united in marriage, September 5, 1854, to Miss Eupha Beim, who was born September 5, 1838. By this marriage they have had eleven children, six of whom are living; namely, Virginia, born in July, 1855; Martha A., born in October, 1857; John L., born January 1, 1865; William R, born February 15, 1869; Eupha A., born in May, 1873; and Dora, born in 1875. Mrs. Phillips died September 23, 1877. September 8, 1881, he married Miss Cora A. Bowen, who was born September 13,...

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Slave Narrative of Julia Williams

Interviewer: Forest H. Lee Person Interviewed: Julia Williams Location: Wadsworth, Ohio Place of Birth: Winepark, Chesterfield County, Virginia Age: 100(ish) Place of Residence: 150 Kyle Street, Wadsworth, Ohio Forest H. Lees C.R. McLean, Supervisor June 10, 1937 Topic: Folkways Medina County, District #5 JULIA WILLIAMS, ex-slave Julia Williams, born in Winepark, Chesterfield County near Richmond, Virginia. Her age is estimated close to 100 years. A little more or a little less, it is not known for sure. Her memory is becoming faded. She could remember her mothers name was Katharine but her father died when she was very small and she remembers not his name. Julia had three sisters, Charlotte, Rose and Emoline Mack. The last names of the first two, Charlotte and Rose she could not recall. As her memory is becoming faded, her thoughts wander from one thing to another and her speech is not very plain, the following is what I heard and understood during the interview. “All de slaves work with neighbors; or like neighbors now-adays. I no work in de fiel, I slave in de house, maid to de mistress.” “After Yankees come, one sister came to Ohio with me.” “The slaves get a whippin if they run away.” “After Yankees come, my ole mother come home and all chillun together. I live with gramma and go home after work each day. Hired out...

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Biographical Sketch of Aldrich, P. Emory

Aldrich, P. Emory, was born in New Salem, Franklin County. His ancestors came from England in 1635, residing at first in Dorchester and Braintree, and afterwards settling in Mendon, Worcester County. After obtaining his early education at the public schools, he fitted for college at the Shelburne Falls Academy, and in private study mastered a collegiate education. He studied law while engaged in teaching at the South, and later attended the Harvard law school. In 1845 he was admitted to the bar in Richmond, Va., but the following year returned to Massachusetts, and after studying for six months with Chapman, Ashmun & Norton, in Springfield, he was admitted to practice in the courts of the State. He began practice in Barre, where he remained for seven years, for three years editing the “Barre Patriot.” He was sent as a delegate to the Convention of 1853 for the revision of the state constitution, and the same year Governor Clifford appointed him district attorney for the middle district, which office he held till 1866. Removing to Worcester in 1854, he became a partner of Hon. P. C. Bacon. In 1862 he was elected mayor of Worcester, declining a re-election. He was sent as a representative to the Legislature in 1866-’67, and for three years after its organization he was a member of the state board of health. In the cause of...

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Biography of Patrick Connor

Patrick Connor. Every one in the Rantoul vicinity of Champaign County knows the home of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Connor. It is located in section 19, five miles northwest of Rantoul and near the schoolhouse to which Mr. Connor sent his own children and with which he has been officially identified. This is a fine farm, comprising 320 acres, and from the road the large white house is almost screened by the fine trees which surround it and most of which were planted and set out by Mr. Connor’s own hands. All these worthy and creditable possessions are the result of Mr. and Mrs. Connor’s self-sacrificing efforts in early days and continued good management at the present. Mr. Patrick Connor was born at Richmond, Virginia, a son of Patrick and Catherine (Kane) Connor, who were natives of Ireland and came to America soon after their marriage in order to better their conditions in the New World. From Virginia they moved to Peoria County, Illinois. Their three children were Mary, Hannah and Patrick. Patrick, the only son, attended school in Peoria County, and soon after reaching manhood, in 1885, he married Mary Sullivan. Mrs. Connor was born in Logan County, Illinois, third in a large family of children born to Daniel and Catherine (Buckley) Sullivan. Mrs. Connor was six years of age when her parents located in Champaign County, and...

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Biography of Hon. Andrew McAlexander

It is with especial pleasure that we are enabled to recite the salient points in the eventful and lengthy career of the distinguished and prominent citizen of Wallowa county, whose name is at the head of this article, since his life has been spent in the noble and self-sacrificing work of the pioneer, wherein he has served with the faithfulness, ability, integrity and energy that are characteristic of him, being a potent influence in the development of two states and having wrought in Oregon, so that his memory will be handed down to generations to come with expressions of appreciation and esteem. Mr. McAlexander was born in Virginia, near Richmond, on August 15, 1815, being the son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Ware) McAlexander, natives also, of Virginia. Our subject’s father did valiant service in the war of 1812, being an officer in that conflict, and the grandfather of our subject, a native of Scotland, was an officer in the most memorable of all struggles that have had to do with our nation, the Revolutionary war. The ancestors were pioneers of this country in colonial days and assisted in laying the foundations of the greatest of all nations on the earth today, and our subject has continued this work in pioneering in Missouri and in this state, where he has been a prominent figure, as later detail will manifest. Andrew...

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