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Location: Chester County PA

Gallery of Photos of Chester County, Pennsylvania

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The following photographs represent the men and women of Chester County Pennsylvania. Stephen Darlington Thomas W. Marshall William H. Hodgson William P. Marshall Andrew J. Williams Capt. Abraham Fetters Capt. John Denithorne Casper S. Francis Charles H. Howell Col. Daniel Foulke Moore Col. Hamilton H. Gilkyson Curtis H. Hannum David McConkey McFarland Dr. William Brower Frederick William Heckel, M. D. Garrett Elwood Brownback George Walters Henry Bean Henry J. Diehl Hon. D. Smith Talbot Hon. Levi B. Kaler Hon. Persifor Frazer Smith Hon. William Bell Waddell...

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New Side Cemetery, Chester County, Pennsylvania

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now New Side Cemetery, Chester County, Pennsylvania. List of persons buried in the old “new side” graveyard on the farm late of Cyrus Cooper, deceased, so far as the same are marked by gravestones. SurnameGivenDeath MonthDeath DayDeath YearyearsmonthsdaysOther WilsonJoseph626175150 WilsonHugh18175420 KerrDaniel524175466 HamillJane815175735Mrs. WilsonJennet48175954Mrs. HamillMary910175912 HamillPhebe919175910 WilsonJohn34176023 MoodyJohn1026176652 HamillMartha821178440 WilsonJoseph128179151 KingAndrew928180036 HamillRobert83180384 HamillJane121180382Mrs. SloanGeorge1230180385 BoggsJane93183085 BoggsWilliam34183389 BoggsRebecca119183584 BoggsElizabeth33183587 HamillJames624183627416 HamillIsrael624183861628 HamillIsrael624184025424 HamillMary621186185Mrs....

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Narrative of the Sufferings of Peter Williamson – Indian Captivities

Not for the faint of heart or stomach, this is a graphically descriptive recounting of the captivity of Peter Williamson, who was taken by the Delaware Indians, at his own house near the forks of the Delaware in Pennsylvania. Of all the sufferings reported by captives, this particular account appears to go above and beyond the usual descriptions, almost to the point of unbelievability – because in this case, he doesn’t simply report the acts of cruelty, but vividly describes them in the most horrid fashion, even to claim the Delaware committed cannibalism on one of their captives, and then explaining how they did it.

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Philadelphia To Steubenville

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Monday, Oct. 4, 1819.–Dr. Hall and myself left Philadelphia at 1 o’clock p. m. after taking an affectionate leave of friends and acquaintances. Fair and pleasant weather, and the roads very fine in consequence of a refreshing shower of rain which fell on the night previous to our setting out. After traveling twenty-two miles and passing some rich and well-cultivated farms we arrived at West Chester at 7 o’clock. West Chester contains about 600 inhabitants, several places of worship, a gaol, etc., etc. A man named Downey is confined in the gaol of this place for debt. He was once in affluence, but from misfortunes and some imprudence he became reduced in circumstances. During his confinement he determined to starve himself to death, and for seven days had refused nourishment of every description. Even the clergy waited on him and endeavored to dissuade him from his rash determination, offering him food of different kinds, but all without avail. He was able to stand. No doubt one or two more days will end his troubles. How long, O my country, will your cheeks continue to be crimsoned by the blush that must follow the plunging an innocent and unfortunate being, a debtor, in a dungeon, amongst murderers and cut-throats? Tuesday, Oct. 5.–Left West Chester at 7 o’clock...

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Biography of Ziba Hibbard Moore

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The late Ziba Hibbard Moore was for many years a prominent figure in Marshall County, and died at Oketo December 19, 1916. He was born near Avondale in Chester County, Pennsylvania, March 14, 1845. He grew up in his native community, was married in Adams County, Pennsylvania, and in early life followed the trade of carpenter. In 1875 he went to the Indian reservation in Gage County, Nebraska, and was employed as a carpenter by the Indian Agency. In the fall of 1879 he removed to Oketo, Kansas, and was a merchant there until he established his bank in 1889. He was sole owner of the private bank and president after it was reorganized. His widow, a very capable business woman, had followed him in that office. Ziba H. Moore was a very strong advocate of republican prineiples. He served one term as mayor of Oketo. Both he and his wife were birthright Quakers, and in the absence of a Friends church at Oketo he gave his active support to the Methodist denomination. He was also affiliated with Oketo Lodge No. 25, Ancient Free & Accepted Masons. In 1905 he erected a modern home, perhaps the best in Oketo, now occupied by his widow. For a number of generations the Moore family lived and did their...

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Biography of Mary A. Flickinger

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Mrs. Flickinger is gratefully remembered for five years of untiring service as assistant superintendent of Oak Hill Industrial Academy. The sphere of her observation and suggestion included all the women’s work in the buildings, occupied by the students, and the special care of the garden and Boy’s Hall. In connection with this daily oversight, there was always manifested a feeling of personal responsibility, to carry to completion at the end of the day, any unfinished work, that would otherwise prevent some of the larger girls from enjoying the privileges of the school, during the evening study hour. Trained in her youth to execute speedily all the kinds of work, usually required on a well arranged farm, and also as a sewer and nurse, one proved a very valuable helper. She became the home physician, administering the medicines and caring for the sick. Her method of treatment included the prevention of some of the milder, but common forms of disease, by the regular administration of some inexpensive antidotes. These two principles were frequently expressed: “Self-preservation is the first law of nature,” and “Prevention is better than cure.” The young people were also encouraged to learn, how to keep and intelligently use, a few simple remedies in the home. She and her husband are both natives of Port...

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Biographical Sketch of Rev. Samuel Gladman

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Rev. Samuel Gladman, who died Jan. 11, 1913, at Eufaula, Oklahoma, was a native of Westchester, Chester County, Pennsylvania. During the early seventies he went to western Texas and engaged in teaching. Sometime afterwards he was licensed and ordained to the work of the gospel ministry. In 1896, when the Presbytery of Kiamichi was organized, he was enrolled as one of its charter members. He was then living at Atoka. During the next year he served New Hope and Sandy Branch Churches, but continued to reside in Atoka until 1900, when he located at Lukfata. Three years later he took charge of Bethany, near Wheelock, and in 1905, effected the organization of the Church in the new town of Garvin. In 1910, he voluntarily resigned the work at Bethany and the office of stated clerk of the Presbytery, and located at Eufaula. As a minister and life-long teacher, he rendered a very helpful service to the various communities, in which he lived and...

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Biography of Horace Mann Philips

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Horace Mann Philips. Up to twenty-five years ago Horace Mann Philips was a Pennsylvania banker. To look after his investments in Kansas real estate he came West, and the visit made such a strong impression upon his mind that he determined forthwith to identify himself with the growing Sunflower State. He had been a resident of Kansas ever since, was a former county treasurer of Shawnee County, and is now engaged in banking at Dover in that county. Mr. Philips was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, December 7, 1850. He is one of four children, two of whom are still living, born on Lewis and Jane (Keeley) Philip. He was reared on a Pennsylvania farm, and his education was finished in the West Chester Normal School. After the first twenty-four years of his life had been spent on the home farm he engaged in the real estate business at West Chester and while there he organized the Dime Savings Bank of Chester County. He was its cashier. He and his partner were also in the loan business, and during this time made some heavy loans in Kansas. At one time it seemed that their faith in the western country was misplaced, and during many deprossing days there was much anxiety as to whether the principal of...

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Biographical Sketch of Harry Brinton Jones

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Jones, Harry Brinton; florist; born, West Chester, Pa., Sept. 13, 1872; son of William, Jr., and Mary B. Painter Jones; educated, West Chester Friends High School and Pierce Business College, Philadelphia, Pa.; 1890-1893, apprentice to Robert Craig & Co., Philadelphia; 1894-1898, mgr. The Penroch Floral Co., Wilmington, Del.; for four months, floral artist to J. Lewis Lousie, Washington, D. C.; asst. mgr. the J. M. Gasser Co., from Oct. 9, 1899, to July 1, 1909; since then sec’y and treas. The Jones & Russel Co.; member Biglow Lodge, F. A. M., and Rotary Club; member Society of Friends; fond of general outdoor...

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Biographical Sketch of Malcolm McBride

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now McBride, Malcolm; plumber, born, Glasgow, Scotland, April 29, 1865; son of Daniel and Marion Ferguson McBride; educated in West Chester, Pa., public schools; married, Cleveland, Dec. 24, 1889, Clara Budbill; issue, three sons; came to West Chester, Pa., from Glasgow, Scotland, in 1879; came to Cleveland in June, 1884; worked as journeyman plumber until June, 1908, then became successor to his uncle, A. A. Parker, in the plumbing business; member Cleveland City Lodge No. 15, F. & A. M., also Oak Lodge No. 77, K. of...

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Biography of James C. Lysle

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now James C. Lysle. The important industries of Leavenworth still include manufacturing and some of the soundest enterprises in this line at the present date their beginning back in the city’s pioneer days. Immediately in this connection, comes the name of James C. Lysle to mind, for he was one of the earliest, one of the most persevering and one of the most straightforward manufacturers that the city had ever known. He was, entirely, a self-made made and in youth had but few educational advantages, but through quiet persistence, faith in himself and his fellow men, and a determination he never departed from, to deal justly with every one, he became possessed of an ample fortune and beyond that was an influence for good that will long remain effective in the city in which he spent forty-four years of usefulness. James C. Lysle was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, December 2, 1828. His father was William Wilson Lysle, who was descended from Scotch ancestors. James C. Lysle grew to manhood in his native place and had but little school training. While quite young he went to work in a paper mill at Mount Vernon and carefully saved his earnings and finally invested them in stock in the mill and lost them when the mill people became bankrupts....

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Biography of H. V. Foster

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now No history of Oklahoma especially having to do with the development of the great oil industry in the state would be complete without extended reference to the Foster family. Their activities have been a most potent element in connection with the development of the natural resources of the southwest and I L and H. V. Foster maintains the family standard of activity, progressiveness, initiative, determination and sagacity in relation to business affairs. He is today President of the Indian Territory Illuminating Oil Company, with headquarters at Bartlesville and is the directing head of the company which controls the famous Foster lease in the Osage Nation. He entered actively upon the management of these interests in 1902 and in the passing years has become an outstanding figure in connection with the oil development of the southwest. A native son of New England, he was born September 6, 1875, in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, his parents being Henry and Gertrude (Daniels) Foster. The father was also born in Westerly, while the mother’s birth occurred in Paxton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. The name of Henry Foster is indelibly engraved upon the financial records of his native state, for he became one of the foremost financiers of Rhode Island, where he engaged in the banking business for many years. Attracted...

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