Location: Chautauqua County KS

Biography of Harry Jiencke

For about a quarter of a century Harry Jiencke traveled about over the State of Kansas as a salesman, building up a large acquaintance and business relationship, but for the past twelve years had been prominently identified with the oil and gas and various other industrial affairs of Independence, where he is one of the well known citizens. Of an old German family of Mecklenburg, he came to America when only a youth. He was born May 27, 1858. His father, Joachim Jiencke, was born in Mecklenburg in 1806 and died there in 1869. He was a man of more than ordinary prominence. He had extensive farming and stock raising interests, was a member of the legal profession and held a judicial office, and during his service in the regular army went through the rebellion of 1848. He was a member of the Lutheran Church. His wife, Henrietta Ahrens, was born in Germany in 1818 and died there in venerable years in 1905. To their marriage were born a large family, fifteen children, and a brief record of them is as follows: William, now deceased; Gustav, a confectioner living in Chicago; Mina, who died in infancy; Louisa, still living in Mecklenburg, Germany, the widow of Henry Demin, who was a miller; Fritz, deceased; Karl, deceased; Marie, living in Mecklenburg, the widow of Otto Beutler, who was a confectioner; Panl,...

Read More

Biography of Herman Genthe

Herman Genthe. The oldest bakery establishment of Topeka under one continuous ownership and management is that conducted by Mr. Herman Genthe, who now had associated with him his oldest son. Mr. Genthe is a master of his trade. He learned it as a boy in Germany, where his ancestors so far as known were millers and had a great deal to do with those grains that furnish the staple food stuffs, wheat and rye. Mr. Genthe’s talent as a maker of fine bread is therefore partly an inheritance from his ancestors, though it had been developed by his individual experience covering many years. He was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1857, a son of Wilhelm Genthe and a grandson of Gottlieb Genthe. His grandfather was born in 1793 and the family as far as it can be traced lived in Saxony. Wilhelm Genthe died in Saxony in 1890. Reared and educated in his native country, Herman Genthe at the age of twenty-four in 1881 left Germany and made the voyage to America. Landing in Baltimore. he was soon afterward in Waco, Texas, and visited a number of other Texas towns. Later he was in Kansas City, Missouri, then in Chicago, Illinois, and returning to Kansas, began going about among the towns and country communities of the state. and for several years in the early ‘8Os was employed at different...

Read More

Biography of Herschel C. Porterfield

Herschel C. Porterfield. Thirty-five years in the oil fields and thirty years as a contractor and producer constitute the record of this veteran of an industry which has brought Kansas untold wealth. Like hundreds of men of this class, he has found Independence as the most satisfactory city for residence and business headquarters. In another respect he is typical of perhaps a majority of the oil men of the country–his native state is Pennsylvania. Born in Butler County, August 10, 1856, he was one of several brothers to become identified with the oil industry in one way or another. Up to the age of eighteen he lived at home and attended the public schools of his native county. Then after six years more spent assisting in the work of his father’s farm, he began regular employment as a worker in the oil district, first in Butler, then in Venango County, afterwards in Cattaraugus County, New York, Washington County and Toledo, Ohio, and from the East came to Kansas on April 1, 1903. He spent a time in Chanute, then went to Peru, but since 1904 has had his home and headquarters in Independence. It was in Venango County, Pennsylvania, in 1886, that Mr. Porterfield did his first contracting. He bought a string of tools, and since then has worn out many sets and is now interested in five strings,...

Read More

Biography of C. O. Ross

C. O. Ross. In a conspicuous place on the roll of men who have become successful through their connection with the oil and gas industry is found the name of C. O. Ross, a native of the Buckeye state and a splendid type of the alert, progressive and public-apirited men whose records are indications that success is ambition’s answer. His long and prominent connection with the oil business began at the time of his majority, when he started in at the bottom to make his way to a position of prominence, and no oil producer in Kansas has a better record for high and straightforward business conduct, or for success won with honor. With the exception of six months spent in Colorado he has made Coffeyville his home and the center of his activities since 1907. Mr. Ross was born on a farm in Wesley Township, Bartlett P. O., Washington County, Ohio, January 16, 1875, and is a son of James and Martha (Heald) Ross. Thomas Ross, his grandfather, was born in 1796, in Scotland, and as a young unmarried man came to America, making his way from New York to Virginia, where for some years he was engaged in farming. In later life he removed to Illinois, where he continued in agricultural pursuits until his death in 1876, when he was eighty years of age. With native thrift...

Read More

Biography of Henry Seymour Sewell

Henry Seymour Sewell. For a man of forty years Henry S. Sewell has had more than an ordinary record of success in business affairs. He is one of the well known merchants of Independence, owns extensive properties in that city and in other sections of Southern Kansas, and all his prosperity is a result of continued concentrated effort through the years since he left home and started out to carve his own career. Born in Montgomery County, Kansas, October 4, 1876, Henry Scymour Sewell is a son of J. B. and Mary M. (James) Sewell, and a grandson of J. G. and Catherine (Maybury) Sewell. His grandparents were among the early pioneers of Montgomery County, having arrived here in 1871 and taking up a homestead about twelve miles from Independence. They were Tennessee people, steady, industrious, people of high principles, and in the past forty-five years the family has left its mark on affairs in Montgomery County in many ways. Mr. J. B. Sewall, father of the Independence merchant, is now in the mercantile business and is postmaster at Bolton, and his career is sketched on other pages of this publication. While a boy Henry S. Sewell attended the public schools of Montgomery County. As he was one of a family of nine children, he saw the necessity of self-support at an early age, and therefore contributed all his...

Read More

Biography of Thomas E. Trigg

Thomas E. Trigg. “A map of busy life” mused the poet Cowper more than a hundred years ago, over his newspaper. The description yet holds good, a century of existence only having widened its field and strengthened its power. With its modern perfected machinery for the garnering of news, and with its vivid portrayal of the world’s happenings, it is, indeed, a map of swiftly passing events, one that had become a necessary vitalizing element and an indispensable factor of every day living. How surely the development of a newspaper in a community marks the latter’s progress. A name well known in journalism in Kansas, is that of Trigg, and a worthy bearer of this honored name is found in the owner and proprietor of the Elgin Journal, Thomas E. Trigg, who had been identified with newspaper work for more than a quarter of a century. Thomas E. Trigg was born at Albia, Iowa, September 15, 1862. His parents were William Allen and Mary Elizabeth (Ware) Trigg, the latter of whom died at Garnett, Kansas, in 1901. The paternal grandfather, Thomas E. Trigg, was born in Virginia, of remote Irish ancestry, in 1809, and died in Linn County, Kansas, in 1891. His people had been early and substantial settlers in Kentucky, and Trigg County, in that state, commemorates their importance. Prior to the Civil war, Thomas E. Trigg was...

Read More

Biography of D. C. Hampton

Coming to Oklahoma during the territorial period in its development, D. C. Hampton is thoroughly familiar with the early history of the state and his memory forms a connecting link between the primitive past with its hardships and privations and the present with all of the advantages and comforts of present-day civilization. He is numbered among the progressive merchants of Bartlesville and his business interests are capably and successfully conducted. He was born in Moultrie County, Illinois, April 30, 1858, of the marriage of Roland Thomas and Ruhama (Howe) Hampton, and in 1866 was taken by his parents to Neodesha, Kansas. In that vicinity the father engaged in farming and it was on his land that the first oil was found in that part of the state. In 1871 the family went to Sedan, Kansas, and there the father followed agricultural pursuits until November, 1874, when he came to Indian Territory, acquiring land ten miles north of the present site of Bartlesville, and this he continued to operate until his demise, which occurred in 1896. In 1885 his son, D. C. Hampton, moved to a farm six miles west of Bartlesville and improved a tract of one hundred and eighty acres owned by his brother, Harrison. Twelve years later the subject of this review removed to Blue Mound, twelve miles northeast of the town, where for five years he...

Read More

Biography of W. M. Tate

For twenty-one years W. M. Tate has been engaged in farming in Nowata county, residing all of this time on his present farm of one hundred and forty acres, four and one-half miles southeast of Nowata. He was born in western Kansas on the 4th of December, 1873, a son of P. A. and Margaret (Barnes) Tate, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Indiana. They moved from Iowa to Kansas one year before W. M. was born and located in Lincoln county, where they lived two years. At the termination of that time they went to Osborne county and the father took up a homestead and timber claim there, acquiring three hundred and twenty acres in all. For eight years they resided on that farm and then sold out, removing to Nemaha county, where they rented farm land until 1894. In that year they came to Indian Territory and located on the Verdigris river, three and one-half miles east of Watova. Leasing land from the Indians, they cleared it and brought it to a highly cultivated state during the eight years of their residence thereon. After two years on a farm in Chautauqua county, Kansas, Mr. and Mrs. Tate returned to Indian Territory and for two years resided on a farm three and one-half miles east of Bartlesville in Washington county. Subsequently they removed to...

Read More

Biography of John C. Kirby, M. D.

John C. Kirby, M. D. For the past fifteen years the name of Dr. John C. Kirby had been increasingly identified with the best tenets of medical and surgical science in the city and vicinity of Cedar Vale. By many of the longest established and most conservative families his skill, resource and obliging temperament have come to be regarded as indispensable, and there exist many who are indebted to him for their restoration to health, happiness and usefulness. Doctor Kirby had the zeal which recognizes no limitations in his profession, and the great unrest which projects him into ever-widening channels of research. His most prized attributes in part are inherited from colonial sires, who braved the perils of early Carolina and whose successors, when duty called, followed the martial fortunes of Washington in the winning of American independence. John C. Kirby was born in Benton County, Missouri, January 7, 1864, and is a son of Robert and Nancy J. (Davis) Kirby. The earliest American ancestor of the family came to North Carolina from England, prior to the War of the Revolution, in which the great-grandfather of Doctor Kirby fought as a soldier of the Continental line. Robert Kirby, the grandfather of the Doctor, was born in North Carolina, fought as an American soldier during the War of 1812, became a pioneer into Tennessee, and in 1843 moved to Benton...

Read More

Biography of Harry Pray Study, A. B., A. M.

Harry Pray Study, A. B., A. M. Among the learned callings there is none, perhaps, that demands a greater degree of patience, tact, specialized knowledge, judgment and natural executive ability than that of the educator, and the individual who enters into this important field, selecting it as a calling, is called upon to make many personal sacrifices and to give many of the best years of his life unreservedly to its demands, often without the emoluments that would be attached to an equal amount of labor expended in another direction. However, there are many satisfying rewards which come to the successful teacher, and some of the best of these have come to Prof. Harry Pray Study, superintendent of schools of Neodesha, Kansas, and an educator of high talents, broad knowledge and extensive experience. Professor Study was born at Fountain City, Indiana, January 7, 1879, and is a son of William H. and Louisa (Cranor) Study. The family originated in Baden, Baden, Germany, and it is thought that the great-grandfather, who was a homesteader into Indiana, was the original emigrant to America, his first residence being in Maryland. In one of these two states, in 1817, was born Isaac Study, the grandfather of Professor Study. He engaged in farming during the greater part of his life, in Indiana, and died at Williamsburg, that state, in 1861. William H. Study was...

Read More

Biography of James Otis Tulloss

James Otis Tulloss. In 1856, the year the republican party had its first presidential candidate in the field, and when the Kansas-Nebraska question was agitating the entire nation, the citizenship of this then territory acquired an important addition in certain members of the Tulloss family. It is a name therefore that had been identified with Kansas for sixty years. James O. Tulloss named above had no part in that earlier period of the family’s connection with Kansas. He represents a younger generation, and his active career had been largely confined to the past twenty years, during which time he had built up one of the largest hardware businesses in Chautauqua County, located in Sedan. The family is of English origin, and was transplanted to Virginia in colonial days. From there other members of the family crossed the mountains to Ohio, and were pioneers in that state as they were also later in Kansas. The pioneer Kansan of the name was John Smith Tulloss, who was born in Knox County, Ohio. He came to Kansas in 1856, homesteaded 320 acres in Franklin County, busied himself with its care and cultivation for a number of years, and died at Rantoul in the same county. He married Julia Smith, a native of Ohio, and both she and her husband died at Rantoul before the birth of James Otis Tulloss. Their children were:...

Read More

Biography of Charles W. Shinn, Hon.

Hon. Charles W. Shinn. In an able and vigorous service of eight years on the bench, Hon. Charles W. Shinn, now city attorney of Neodesha, Kansas, gained an enviable reputation for legal ability, thorough understanding of the law, wise judgments and unimpeachable integrity. As a private practitioner of law this reputation is still justified, while as a citizen Judge Shinn is numbered with the foremost men of Neodesha. Judge Shinn is a native of Illinois, born May 30, 1854, in Hancock County, and is a son of John K. and Tabitha (Ogden) Shinn. The Shinn family is of English ancestry and of Revolutionary stock. Family records show that as early as 1678 John Shinn, an honest farmer and millwright in England, found religious persecution intolerable, and with others of the Quaker faith crossed the Atlantic Ocean and settled in New Jersey, establishing a Quaker colony there. Of this ancestor Isaac Shinn, the great-grandfather of Judge Shinn, was a descendant and he served in the Revolutionary war, afterward settling in Harrison County, now in West Virginia. George Shinn, grandfather of Judge Shinn, was born in Harrison County, Virginia, in 1787, and in 1836 was the pioneer of the family in Hancock County, Illinois, where he died in 1861. He married Sarah Kirk, who was born in Harrison County in 1783 and died in Hancock County, Illinois, in 1871. No member...

Read More

Biography of Charles W. Brown

Charles W. Brown, a resident of Caney, had a close relationship with this section of Southeastern Kansas, where he had resided for more than thirty-five years and where he still owned a large ranch. Mr. Brown’s mother was an eighth Osage Indian and a member of that tribe, and her family thus had proprietory rights in the lands of Southern Kansas and Northern Oklahoma long before white settlers were permitted to settle there. In the paternal line Mr. Brown represents a pioneer family of Wyandotte County, Ohio. His ancestors came from England in colonial days. His grandfather William Brown was born September 12, 1796, in Somerset County, Maryland, and was an early and very prominent settler at Carey, Ohio, where he died in June, 1866. With an exceptional education he was a leader among his fellow citizens and served as a judge at Carey for many years. He was also a writer and author, and spent most of his life on a farm. He married Eliza Kooken, who was born in Pennsylvania, February 14, 1804, and died at Carey, Ohio, in 1876. Charles W. Brown was born in the State of California January 26, 1861. California was the home of the family for a few years while his father W. S. Brown sought a fortune there in the gold fields. W. S. Brown was born in Ohio May 11,...

Read More

Biography of Carl Ackarman

Carl Ackarman of Sedan had justified all the predictions and wishes of his friends as to a successful career in the law. He had ability, training, industry and courage, and had handled with exceptional skill every interest entrusted to him since he opened his law office at Sedan. In 1916 he was re-elected for another term as county attorney of Chantauqua County. His first term had given such general satisfaction that he was unopposed by any candidate for re-election. Born at Moline, Kansas, January 16, 1881, he was reared in Sedan, educated in the public schools, graduating from high school in 1898, and for the following four years gave his time and energy to his father, a well known hardware merchant. He preferred a professional rather than a commercial career, and as soon as he could give up his responsibilities in connection with his father’s business he entered the law school of the University of Kansas at Lawrence, where he remained until graduating in 1905 LL. B. Mr. Ackarman made not only a good student record in Lawrence, but also contributed to the athletic prowess of the university team. He played three years on the Kansas University football team, and he contributed to the many victories won by the team in those years. He also excelled in the weight events in the track and field contests. He is a...

Read More

Biography of Charles Edwin Westlake

Charles E. Westlake. There is a type of business man who had apparently a peculiar genius for doing a number of things well and efficiently. Such a man had the commercial instinct highly developed. Charles E. Westlake of Sedan illustrates the type. He had been a farmer and rancher, had merchandised in several different lines, had been an oil producer, and is now engaged in the undertaking business at Sedan, and one of the livest and most energetic citizens of that town. Both he and his family have been identified with Kansas a great many years. The Westlakes originated in England, where his grandfather, John Westlake, was born. He came to Canada, but lived retired in that country and died in the Province of Quebec, being killed by a runaway horse. As a resident of England he followed merchandising. Walter Westlake, father of Charles E., was born in England in 1842, came as a young man to the Province of Quebec, Canada, was married there, and for several years engaged in farming. In 1872 he landed at Sabetha, in Nemaha County, Kansas, and continued an active farmer in that community until his death in 1906. After becoming an American citizen he supported the republican party and was the recipient of several township offices in Nemaha County. He belonged to the Episcopal Church and was affiliated with the Indenendent Order...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest