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Location: Chatham County NC

Biography of William H. Branson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Very few American families can trace their ancestry beyond three or four generations. This is due to the lack of a historical spirit among the early settlers of a country. They make no records, and only vague traditions carry their histories down to other generations. When the Branson family came to America cannot be accurately determined. It is, however, certain that early in the eighteenth century Thomas Branson came from England and settled in Chatham County, N. C. This makes the Branson family one of the old families of North Carolina, and identifies them with all the periods of the State’s growth. William Henry Branson belonged to the fifth generation from Thomas Branson. William’s father was named Thomas, doubtless for the original Branson, and was born in Randolph County, near Asheboro, in the year 1800. For four generations the Branson family remained in this section of the State, a fact which indicates an indisposition to rove from point to point in search of easier fortunes. Thomas Branson, the father of William H. Branson, was twice married; the first time to Miss Mary Lewellyn, the second time to Mrs. Prescott, who was a Miss Buck. William was the only child by this second wife. He was born near Cedar Falls, Randolph County, May 23, 1860. His father...

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Chatham County, North Carolina – Wills 1784-1799

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A. 1784 ASHFORD, WILLIAM, John and Sarah. 1786 ALLEN, WILLIAM, Mary (wife), John and Betsy. 1789 ALSTON, WILLIAM, John J., William C., Oroondates, Mary Ann and Ann. 1795 ANDERSON, JAMES, Martha, Jane, Susanna and Mary, Lewis, Lucy; Holcomb and Henrietta, (sisters). B. 1784 BRASWELL, HENRY, Sarah (wife), Cynthia and William. 1784 BROWDER, ABNER, Wife (not named), Lucy, John, Nancy, Sally and Polly. 1784 BROWDER, EDMOND, wife (not named); John, Darius, Lois, Molly Emma, Silvia and, De borah. 1785 BANKS, DAVID, Elizabeth (wife), Mary, James, Sarah and Drewry. 1790 BRAY, HENRY, Mary (wife), Edward and Henry. 1792 BREWER, OLIVER, Rebecca (wife), George, Oliver, William, Henry, Christopher, Frances and Edward. 1795 BEASLEY, HENRY, Isham, Martha, Tabitha and Betty. 1796 BROOKS, THOMAS, Mary (wife), Stephen, Thomas, Samuel, Attie, Rebecca and Hannah. 1796 BROWN, ARCHIBALD, Agnes (wife), Andrew, Benjamin, Frank, Jenny, Anna. 1797 BROWN, ABNER, wife (not named); Lucy, Sally, John, Nancy and Polly. 1799 BOOKER, JOHN, Omai (wife), John, Sally, Nancy, Polly, Isaiah, Hardy, Jane, William, Phoebe, Susanna and James. C. 1787 CRUTCHFIELD, HENRY, Milly (wife), James, John, Henry and Elizabeth. 1791 COLLINS, WILLIAM, Sarah (wife), Mary and James. 1793 COPELAND, WILLIAM, wife (not named), Richard and John. 1795 CLARK, WILLIAM, Frances (wife); Anne, Mary, Fanny and Winny. 1795 CROW, JAMES, John, James, Stephen, Reuben, Isaac, Abel, William, Hannah...

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Slave Narrative of Ora M. Flagg

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Ora M. Flagg Location: 811 Oberlin Road,┬áRaleigh, North Carolina Place of Birth: Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: October 16, 1860 My name is Ora M. Flagg. I wus born in Raleigh near the Professional Building, in the year 1860, October 16. My mother wus named Jane Busbee. Her marster wus Quent Busbee, a lawyer. Her missus wus Julia Busbee. She wus a Taylor before she married Mr. Busbee. Now I tell you, I can’t tell you exactly, but the old heads died. The old heads were the Scurlocks who lived in Chatham County. I heard their names but I don’t remember them. Their children when they died drawed for the slaves and my mother wus brought to Raleigh when she wus eight years old. She came from the Scurlocks to the Busbees. The Taylors were relatives of the Scurlocks, and were allowed to draw, and Julia Taylor drawed my mother. It wus fixed so the slaves on this estate could not be sold, but could be drawed for by the family and relatives. She got along just middlin’ after her missus died. When her missus died, mother said she had to look after herself. Mr. Busbee would not allow anyone to whip mother. He married Miss Lizzie Bledsoe the...

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Slave Narrative of Sarah Anne Green

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Travis Jordan Person Interviewed: Sarah Anne Green Location: Durham County, North Carolina Age: 78 My mammy an’ pappy wuz Anderson an’ Hannah Watson. We fus’ belonged to Marse Billy an’ Mis Roby Watson, but when Marse Billy’s daughter, Mis’ Susie ma’ied young Marse Billy Headen, Ole Marse give her me, an’ my mammy an’ my pappy for er weddin’ gif’. So, I growed up as Sarah Anne Headen. My pappy had blue eyes. Dey wuz jus’ like Marse Billy’s eyes, kaze Ole Marse wuz pappy’s marster an’ his pappy too. Ole Marse wuz called Hickory Billy, dey called him dat kaze he chewed hickory bark. He wouldn’ touch ‘bacca, but he kept er twis’ of dis bark in his pocket mos’ all de time. He would make us chillun go down whare de niggers wuz splittin’ rails an’ peel dis bark off de logs befo’ dey wuz split. De stuff he chewed come off de log right under de bark. After dey’d skin de logs we’d peel off dis hickory ‘bacca in long strips an’ make it up in twis’s for Ole Marse. It wuz yellah an’ tas’ sweet an’ sappy, an’ he’d chew an’ spit, an’ chew an’ spit. Mis’ Roby wouldn’ ‘low no chewin’ in de house, but Ole Marse sho done some...

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Slave Narrative of Kitty Hill

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Kitty Hill Location: 329 West South Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 76-77 I tole you yisterday dat my age wus 76 years old, but my daughter come home, an’ I axed her’ bout it an’ she say I is 77 years old. I don’t know exactly the date but I wus born in April. I wus a little girl ’bout five years ole when de surrender come, but I don’t’ member anything much’ bout de Yankees. I wus born in Virginia, near Petersburg, an’ mother said de Yankees had been hanging’ round dere so long dat a soldier wus no sight to nobody. ‘Bout de time de Yankees come I’ member hearin’ dem talk ’bout de surrender. Den a Jew man by the name of Isaac Long come to Petersburg, bought us an’ brought us to Chatham County to a little country town, named Pittsboro. Ole man Isaac Long run a store an’ kept a boarding house. We stayed on de lot. My mother cooked. We stayed there a long time atter de war. Father wus sent to Manassas Gap at the beginning of de war and I do not ‘member ever seein’ him. My mother wus named Viney Jefferson an’ my father wus named Thomas Jefferson. We ‘longed to...

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Slave Narrative of Adeline Crump

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Adeline Crump Location: 526 Cannon Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 73 My name is Adeline Crump, and I am 73 years old. My husband’s name wus James Crump. My mother’s wus Marie Cotton and my father’s name wus Cotton. My mother belonged to the Faucetts; Rich Faucett wus her marster. Father belonged to the Cottons; Wright Cotton wus his marster. My maiden name wus Cotton. Mother and father said they were treated all right and that they loved their white folks. They gave them patches, clothed them tolerably well, and seed that they got plenty to eat. The hours of work wus long. Nearbout everybody worked long hours then, but they said they wus not mistreated ’bout nothing. When they got sick marster got a doctor, if they wus bad off sick. They wus allowed holidays Christmas and at lay-by time, an’ they wus ‘lowed to hunt possums an’ coons at night an’ ketch rabbits in gums. They also caught birds in traps made of splinters split from pine wood. Mother and father had no learnin’. They would not allow them to learn to read and write. Marster wus keerful ’bout that. I cannot read an’ write. My mother and father told me many stories ’bout the patterollers and Ku...

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Slave Narrative of Dorcas Griffeth

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Dorcas Griffeth Location: 602 E. South Street, North Carolina Age: 80 You know me every time you sees me don’t you? Who tole you I wus Dorcas Griffith? I seed you up town de other day. Yes, yes, I is old. I is 80 years old. I remember all about dem Yankees. The first biscuit I ever et dey give it to me. I wus big enough to nus de babies when de Yankees came through. Dey carried biscuits on dere horses, I wus jist thinkin’ of my young missus de other day. I belonged to Doctor Clark in Chatham County near Pittsboro. My father wus named Billy Dismith, and my mother wus named Peggy Council. She belonged to the Councils. Father, belonged to the Dismiths and I belonged to the Clarks. Missus wus named Winnie. Dey had tolerable fine food for de white folks, but I did not get any of it. De food dey give us wus mighty nigh nuthin’. Our clothes wus bad and our sleepin’ places wus not nuthin’ at all. We had a hard time. We had a hard time then and we are havin’ a hard time now. We have a house to live in now, and de chinches eat us up almos, and...

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Slave Narrative of Tempie Herndon Durham

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Travis Jordan Person Interviewed: Tempie Herndon Durham Location: 1312 Pine St., Durham, North Carolina Age: 103 I was thirty-one years ole when de surrender come. Dat makes me sho nuff ole. Near ’bout a hundred an’ three years done passed over dis here white head of mine. I’se been here, I mean I’se been here. ‘Spects I’se de olest nigger in Durham. I’se been here so long dat I done forgot near ’bout as much as dese here new generation niggers knows or ever gwine know. My white fo’ks lived in Chatham County. Dey was Marse George an’ Mis’ Betsy Herndon. Mis Betsy was a Snipes befo’ she married Marse George. Dey had a big plantation an’ raised cawn, wheat, cotton an’ ‘bacca. I don’t know how many field niggers Marse George had, but he had a mess of dem, an’ he had hosses too, an’ cows, hogs an’ sheeps. He raised sheeps an’ sold de wool, an’ dey used de wool at de big house too. Dey was a big weavin’ room whare de blankets was wove, an’ dey wove de cloth for de winter clothes too. Linda Hernton an’ Milla Edwards was de head weavers, dey looked after de weavin’ of de fancy blankets. Mis’ Betsy was a good weaver too. She weave...

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Biography of Gen. Wm. B. Stokes

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Gen. Wm. B. Stokes, one of the leading attorneys and best-known citizens of Alexandria, was born in 1814 in Chatham County, N. C. He is the second and only surviving one of their children of Sylvanus and Mary (Christian) Stokes. The father was of English descent, born in Chatham County, N. C., in 1783, a son of Thos. Stokes who was a native of Virginia and a cousin of ex-Gov. Munford Stokes, of North Carolina. Sylvanus was married in North Carolina about 1810, and in 1818 started for Tennessee, where his father owned large tracts of land. While en route his team ran away and he was killed by the wagon running over him. The family proceeded on their journey and located in Smith County near Temperance Hall, where the widow remained until her death in 1853. She was a native of the same State and county, and also same age as her husband. The subject of our sketch was educated in the best schools of Smith (now Dekalb) County. In January 1832, he married miss Parilee A., daughter of Abraham and Hannah Overall, of Dekalb County, where Mrs. Stokes was born in May 1815. Thirteen children came to this union, of whom one son and six daughters are now living: Melissia J., wife of W....

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Gordon L. Siler

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Mechanic, Aviator, Div. 883, Aero Squadron. Born in Chatham County, July 3, 1894; son of A. R. and Nannie Siler. Entered service April 7, 1918, at Siler City, N.C. Sent to St. Paul, Minn. Transferred to Camp Ossie, Minn., from there to Montgomery, Ala., Aviator Depot No. 3. Mustered out at Montgomery, Ala., March 29,...

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Walter J. Kanoy

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Private, Inf., Co. D, 167th Reg., 42nd Div. Born in Chatham County, N.C., Oct. 12, 1895; son of C. E. and Jane Kanoy and husband of Allie McCauley Kanoy. Entered the service at Troy, N.C., Aug. 9, 1918, and sent to Camp Wadsworth, S. C., and transferred to Camp Stuart, Va. Sailed for France Sept. 23, 1918. Mustered out of the service at Camp Lee, Va., May 3,...

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John G. Herndon

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Corpl., Co. F, 18th Div., 35th Inf.; of Chatham County; son of Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Herndon, and husband of Lena May Herndon. Entered service May, 1917, at Durham, N.C. Sent to Fort Thomas. Transferred to Arizona, then to San Antonio, Texas. Served on Mexican border 16 months. Was in one battle on Mexican border the 27th day of August, 1918. Mustered out at Camp Sevier Feb. 18,...

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Victor E. Harris

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Private, Co. C, 119th Inf., 30th Div. Born in Chatham County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Harris. Entered the service at Durham, N.C., April 1, 1918, was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and from there to Camp Sevier, S. C. Transferred to Camp Merritt, N. J., and sailed for France May 11, 1918. Fought at Ypres and wounded by shrapnel at Ypres July 18, 1918. Was sent to Hospital No. 19 at Vechy and to Walter Reid Hospital, Washington, D. C. Returned to USA Sept. 11, 1918. Mustered out at Camp Wadsworth, S. C., Feb. 8,...

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Clyde C. Headen

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Corpl., Artly., Truck Co. No. 6, 1st Corps Artly. Park. Born in Chatham County, N.C., May 24, 1891; son of I. B. and Sallie Perry Headen. Entered the service at Siler City, N.C., March 27, 1918. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and then transferred to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France May 22, 1918. Promoted to Corpl. Aug. 1, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne, Chateau-Thierry, Verdun, Aisne Marne, Oise Aisne and Champagne Defensive. Mustered out of the service at Camp Lee, Va., June 6,...

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J. G. Goldston

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Sergt., Batry, 316, Q. M., 27th Div.; son of Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Goldston; of Chatham County. Entered service April 1, 1918, at Greensboro, N.C. Sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky. Transferred to Johnson, Fla., then to Camp Stuart, Va. Overseas to France June 29, 1918. Served six months with the Army of Occupation. Returned to United States Sept. 20, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Dix, N. J., Sept. 25,...

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