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Location: Charlestown New Hampshire

The Proprietors of Norwich Vermont

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The larger part of the names of the grantees of Norwich are names of Connecticut men then resident in Mansfield and neighboring towns. Captain Hezekiah Johnson, Samuel Slafter, Joseph Storrs, and William Johnson 3rd, are known to have lived in Mansfield; Amos Fellows, James West, Adoniram Grant, and Samuel Cobb were of Tolland; Ebenezar Heath, Captain Abner Barker and William Johnson of Willington, towns adjacent to Mansfield on the north. The last nine names are those of New Hampshire and Massachusetts men, several of them members of the provincial government in the former province. Major Joseph Blanchard was of Dunstable, Mass. He had executed in 1760, by direction of Governor Wentworth, the first survey of the townships lying along the river from Charlestown to Newbury. His name appears as proprietor in many town charters about this time. But few of the original grantees ever came personally to Norwich to settle. Many of them, it is probable, were people of considerable property, well advanced in life, whose years unfitted them to endure the hard-ships of pioneers in a new settlement. Such would naturally transfer their rights to their sons, or to the young and enterprising among their friends and neighbors. This is known to have been the case in several instances. But Jacob Fenton and Ebenezar Smith,...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Frances Noble – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the captivity of Frances Noble, who was, among others, taken by the Indians from Swan Island, in Maine, about the year 1755; compiled by John Kelly, Esq. of Concord, New Hampshire, from the minutes and memoranda of Phinehas Merrill. Esq. of Stratham, in the same state; and by the Former Gen. Tleman communicated for publication to the editors of the Historical Collections of New Hampshire.

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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Biography of John P. Rounsevel

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John P. Rounsevel, formerly a well-known wool buyer of Claremont, was born in Unity, N.H., January 2, 1815, son of Royal and Betsey (Sweat) Rounsevel. Rounseville, the original spelling of the name, was changed to the present form by Joseph Rounsevel about the year 1768. In 1749 Thomas Rounseville wrote from Ottery St. Mary to Philip Rounseville, of England, who afterward came to this country. He settled in Freetown, Mass., and was called by the townspeople King Philip. His son Joseph, who, born January 3, 1737, died in 1827, went to Washington, N.H., between 1768 and 1772, from Middleboro, Mass., having previously resided in East Freetown. Joseph was a good farmer, a well-read man, and a Justice of the Peace. He executed the legal business of the town, and represented Washington with other towns in the General Court. His children were: Alden, Charity, Phebe, John, Rosamond, and Royal. Alden married Hannah Wells. Charity married Manasseh Farnsworth in 1784. Phebe never married. John married Rebecca Chamberlain in 1768. Rosamond married Thomas Putnam in 1787. Royal’s children were: Joseph, Minerva, Elle I., Lyman, and John P. Of them Joseph, who was born in 1796, and died December 24, 1858, married Betsey Laughton, who had by him five children-Sarah, Harriet, Holmes, Lyman, and Marinda. Minerva, born in 1799, who...

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Biography of Charles Lewis Perry

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Charles Lewis Perry, for twenty-five years a successful tailor of Claremont, Sullivan County, N.H., was born in Charlestown, N.H., March 4, 1823, son of Charles and Mary (Putnam) Perry. At the age of seventeen Mr. Perry came to Claremont, where he learned the tailor’s trade, and then began business for himself. Devoting his entire attention to custom work, he became prosperous, and in 1857 built the handsome business block known as Perry’s Block, where he located until obliged to retire on account of failing health. He was succeeded in business by his son, Charles Eugene. Mr. Perry was a business man of exceptional ability, scrupulously honest, a man of exemplary habits, public-spirited, a useful citizen and a devoted husband and father. He had accumulated a competency, and was looking forward with pleasure to a life free from cares, when he was called to leave this world, his death occurring January 15, 1876. He is survived by his wife, formerly Dorothy Blake Mitchell, daughter of Charles and Silvia (Mitchell) Mitchell, and four sons-Charles E., Frank H., Theodore, and Arthur. William Mitchell, Mrs. Perry’s paternal grandfather, was born in Boston. He came to Claremont from Henniker, N.H., settling in the north-eastern part of the town, on Cornish Road, where he was one of the earliest farmers. He was...

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Biography of Roswell Huntoon

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Roswell Huntoon, an enterprising farmer residing in Langdon, was born in the town of Unity, this county, October 14, 1820, son of Lemuel and Sybil (Palmer) Huntoon. Phillip Huntoon, born in Wiltshire, England, in 1664, was the immigrant ancestor of this family. The next in line was John. Then came Charles, who was born October 12, 1725, at Kingston, N.H., and died in Unity, May 27, 1819. He was a very prominent man in Unity, and he served in the General Court of the State. He bore arms in both the French and Indian War and the Revolutionary War. His son, Charles Huntoon, Jr., was born in Unity, December 15, 1755, and died January 2, 1838. Charles married Maria Smith, of Kingston, N.H.; and their union was blessed by the birth of six children-Robert, Jacob, Pollie, Maria, Lemuel, and Erastus. Lemuel Huntoon was born in Unity, November 29, 1793. About the year 1835 he came to Langdon, and lived here until his death, which occurred November 15, 1878, when nearly eighty-five years of age. He was a blacksmith by trade, and his years of active labor were spent at the forge. He was one of the first in this section to espouse the cause of temperance and join the temperance club. Sybil, his wife, was a...

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Biographical Sketch of Hiram C. Ellenwood

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Hiram C. Ellenwood, a carpenter and undertaker of Charlestown, N.H., was born in Woodward, Vt., November 26, 1826, son of Cyrus and Sally (Draper) Ellenwood. His grandfather, Joseph Ellenwood, was a native of Greenfield, N.H., where he also resided during the greater part of his life, engaged in general farming. He married Mary Punchard, who became the mother of nine children. Their son, Cyrus, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Greenfield, N.H., in 1782. He was a shoemaker by trade, and removed to Charlestown at the age of fifty years. In 1811 he married Sally Draper, and they had seven children-Sally, Harvey, Simeon, Frances, Hiram (the subject of this sketch), Warren F., and Sarah. Hiram C. Ellenwood spent his school days in Acworth, N.H., where he stayed until he was twelve years of age. He then went to Charlestown, and worked on different farms outside the village. When he was twenty years old, he began to learn the carpenter’s trade, serving as an apprentice for three years. He afterward went to Boston, where he worked at his trade for two years. On his return he continued as a carpenter; but, becoming sexton for the Unitarian church, he entered also into the business of undertaking, which he has continued for thirty-five years. He...

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Biography of David E. Farwell

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now David E. Farwell, one of the most extensive farmers of Charlestown, N.H., his native place, was born March 20, 1845, the youngest son of George and Aurilla (Brownell) Farwell. He is of the seventh generation in descent from John and Priscilla (Mullens) Alden, of the “Mayflower” company, who were married in Plymouth probably in 1621. [For further notes of ancestry see sketch of Jesse H. Farwell .] Mr. Farwell’s great-grandfather, William Farwell, who was born in 1712, was one of the first settlers in Charlestown, coming from Mansfield, Conn. He died here, December 11, 1801. His children by his wife, Bethiah Eldridge, were: William, born in Mansfield in 1749; Phoebe; Gladian; Edwin; and Jesse. William Farwell, Jr., was one of the first in New Hampshire to accept the doctrine of Universalism. Though his opportunities for an education were meagre, he was gifted with a quick intellect and a retentive memory, and was one of the best qualified 1790 and 1795 was converted to Universalism, and was probably the first to preach it in Vermont, there being only two other preachers in the State at that time. The Rev. William Farwell lived for some time in Barre, Vt. He married Miss Phoebe Crosby. Jesse Farwell, David E. Farwell’s grandfather, was born August 15, 1768. He was a...

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Biography of Frederic Augustus Briggs

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Frederic Augustus Briggs, a well-known hotel man of Claremont, N.H., was born in Charlestown, this State, September 9, 1838, son of Joseph Gilman and Abigail (Woods) Briggs. Some interesting facts concerning the origin of the Briggs family may be found in Burke’s “Peerage” and in the History of the County of Norfolk, England, by Bloomfield. It is shown that before the time of Edward I. (1272 ) the representatives of the family assumed the surname of De Ponte or Pontibus. Many of them from the time of de Ponte de Salle, whose son John was born in 1383, became men of mark, and held high and responsible positions in church and State, or accomplished deeds of renown. One Thomas Brygge, of Holt, in 1392, in company with Sir Thomas Swinbourne, made a pilgrimage to the Holy Sepulchre; and an account thereof, written by himself, is still extant in a manuscript preserved in the library of Caius College, Cambridge University, England. Thomas Bryggs, Rector of Risingham in 1539, subsequently became Chaplain to Lady Mary, sister of King Edward VI. He was also Vicar of Kenninghall and later Vicar of Windham. Henry Brygge, born at Halifax, Yorkshire, in 1556, was a mathematician. In 1617 he visited Napier at Edinburgh, and induced him to make an important change in...

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Biography of George S. Bond

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now George S. Bond, a manufacturer of Charlestown, was born in that town, March 2, 1837, son of Silas and Alice (Abbot) Bond. His grandfather, William Bond, who was born in Watertown, Mass., at the age of twenty years came to Charlestown, and thereafter carried on general farming during the remainder of his active life. One of his six children was Silas Bond, who married Alice Abbot, and also was the father of six children, including the subject of this sketch. George S. Bond was educated in the district schools of the town. At the age of seven years his father died. When about nine years old he went to Fall River, where he worked for two years. After his return to Charlestown he worked on various farms in Charlestown and Acworth for about five years. He subsequently went to Brockton, Mass., learned the shoe finishing business, and remained there until he was eighteen years of age. He then went to Syracuse, N.Y., where he worked at bis trade for two years. In 1856 he returned to Charlestown and took up the tinsmith trade. He then went to Putney, Vt., where he worked for four years. In 1865 he bought out the tin store of W. B. Downer, and afterward carried it on for fifteen years. On...

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Biographical Sketch of Dr. Horace P. Downs

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now DR. HORACE P. DOWNS. – Doctor Downs is one of those highly educated gentlemen who have deliberately chosen a new country in which to exercise abilities that are ever in demand in the older communities. He was born in Freedom, New Hampshire, in 1840. The family made a number of removals. It was at great Falls that he received his first comprehensive instructions; and at Exeter he pursued his academic course, and graduated from the medical department of Bowdoin College in 1865. Entering at once upon the practice of his profession, he chose a location at Tamworth, New Hampshire, and three years later secured a lucrative practice at Charlestown, which has since been incorporated with Boston, Massachusetts. In 1878 he determined to transfer his interests to the Pacific coast, and selected a home in that part of Whatcom county which has now been delimitated and named Skagit. In 1880 he was elected commissioner of the old county, and in the autumn of 1883 was appointed by the legislature as one of the three commissioners to segregate and organize the new county. At the special election following, he was chosen auditor, and by re-election still holds this office. He also served on the committee to make a settlement of affairs relating to the two counties. He is...

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Biographical Sketch of Frederick Locke

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (V) Frederick, son of Lieutenant Joshua Locke, was born at Westboro, June 6. 1757, and married (first) in 1793, at Charlestown, New Hampshire, Anna Farwell, who died in 1804. He married (second), July 15, 1805, Lucy Graves, of Washington, New Hampshire. He prepared for college at Leicester Academy, but instead of going to college enlisted in the American army shortly after the revolution began, anti remained in the army during most of the war. After the war was ended he is said to have often remarked that “he did not regret the decision he made, though he lost his pay and his health.” He was a civil engineer and a surveyor by occupation, and lived at Acworth and Charlestown, New Hampshire. He died January 17, 1834. Children of first wife, born at Acworth: Henry, September 24, 1799; Melinda, March 9, 1804. Children of second wife, born at Charlestown: Frederick, May 9, 1807; William G., mentioned elsewhere; Catherine J., February 28, 1810; Lucy G., May 2, 1811; Ann F., March 30, 1813; Sarah F., April 6, 1815; John H., March 31, 1817; Rachel W., April 24, 1819; Mary J., June 7, 1821; Benjamin F., November 13,...

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