Location: Chapel Hill North Carolina

Slave Narrative of “Aunt” Nina Scott

Interviewer: F. S. DuPre Person Interviewed: Nina Scott Date of Interview: May 17, 1937 Location: Spartanburg, South Carolina “Aunt” Nina Scot sat on her front porch. She was drinking some liquid from a bottle which she said would help her trouble. Being short of breath, she was not able to talk very much. She said that she was very small at the time she was set free. “My Marster and his folks did not treat me like a nigger,” she said, “they treated me like they did other white folks.” She said that she and her mother had belonged to Dr. Shipp, who taught at Wofford College, that they had come here from Chapel Hill, N.C. and that she was a tarheel negro. She said that white people in slavery days had two nurses, one for the small children and one for the older ones. “Yes sir, those were certainly fine people that lived on the Campus during those days. (Wofford Col. Campus) When the ‘raid’ came on, people were hiding things all about their places.” She referred to the Yankee soldiers who came to Spartanburg after the close of the Civil War. “My mother hid the turkeys and told me where she had hidden them.” Dr. Shipp came up to Nina one day and asked her where the turkeys were hidden. She told him they were hidden behind...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Anngady

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Mary Anngady Location: 1110 Oakwood Avenue, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 80 (Princess Quango Hennadonah Perceriah) 1110 Oakwood Avenue, Raleigh, North Carolina. I was eighteen years old in 1875 but I wanted to get married so I gave my age as nineteen. I wish I could recall some of the ole days when I was with my missus in Orange County, playing with my brothers and other slave children. I was owned by Mr. Franklin Davis and my madam was Mrs. Bettie Davis. I and my brother used to scratch her feet and rub them for her; you know how old folks like to have their feet rubbed. My brother and I used to scrap over who should scratch and rub her feet. She would laugh and tell us not to do that way that she loved us both. Sometimes she let me sleep at her feet at night. She was plenty good to all of the slaves. Her daughter Sallie taught me my A B C’s in Webster’s Blue Back spelling Book. When I learned to Spell B-a-k-e-r, Baker, I thought that was something. The next word I felt proud to spell was s-h-a-d-y, shady, the next l-a-d-y, lady. I would spell them out loud as I picked up chips in the yard to build a fire with. My missus Bettie gave me...

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Edward G. Bond

Lieut., was born in Edenton, North Carolina, on the 16th of May, 1890. He was a son of Judge and Mrs. W. M. Bond. After attending the Graded School at Edenton he was sent to Randolph-Macon Academy at Bedford, Virginia, and from there was later sent to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. There he united with the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, and after completing his studies at said University he remained there and read law. Completing his law course, he passed the examination for license to practice before the Supreme Court of North Carolina before his twenty-first birthday. At each of the schools he was regarded as a close and diligent student, and in the few years after he received his law license he rapidly arose in the profession. He was of broad reading, with most retentive memory, a strong public speaker and most interesting in private conversation. Never having been connected in any way with military service, when trouble was threatened along the Mexican border he volunteered and became a member of Company I, an old Edenton military company. He was soon thereafter sent to Camp Glenn, in North Carolina, and after staying there several weeks was sent with his company to the border. When the trouble there had subsided, the regiment to which he belonged was returned to Goldsboro, N.C., and was not disbanded,...

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Biography of Hon. Henry Montague Willis

Hon. Henry Montague Willis, San Bernardino, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, September 21. 1831. His ancestors were among the first English settlers of the colony of Virginia and Maryland prior to the Revolution. His father, Mr. Henry H. Willis, was a captain in the merchant marine, with whom the subject of this memoir made a number of voyages before he was twelve years of age, alternating between school and the sea. At the age of twelve he adopted a seafaring life, and during six years’ sailing the briny deep he visited the ports of the Mediterranean, England, France, Ireland, Rio Janeiro, Montevideo, Buenos Ayres, Pernambuco and Valparaiso, and rose by successive steps to full seaman, and finally to officer of the vessel. While in Rio Janeiro in 1848 as second mate of the bark Helen M. Fiedler, a fleet of clippers arrived with the first passengers for the gold fields of California. This was the first intelligence received of the discovery of gold. One of the ships of this fleet being disabled, his vessel was chartered to carry a portion of her passengers to California; and loading with such cargo as was most appropriate for the market of San Francisco, the bark started on her voyage. June 28, 1849; the vessel anchored in San Francisco harbor, having touched only at Valparaiso for supplies. Soon after his arrival the young...

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