Location: Cattaraugus County NY

Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Cattaraugus Reservation, in Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Erie Counties, New York, as delineated on the map, occupies both sides of Cattaraugus creek. It is 9.5 miles long on a direct east and west line, averages 3 miles in width at the center, dropping at is eastern line an additional rectangle of 2 by 3 miles. A 6-mile strip on the north and 2 “mile blocks” at diagonal corners are occupied by white people, and litigation is pending as to their rights and responsibilities. The Seneca Nation claims that the permit or grant under which said lands were occupied and...

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Oil Spring Reservation Map

Oil Spring reservation, in Cattaraugus County, New York, as indicated on the Allegany reservation map, contains 640 acres in 2 towns and counties. It was by oversight included in the treaty made at Big Tree, in the sale by the Seneca Nation of 3,500,000 acres to Robert Morris, and passed with his title to the Holland Land Company. A suit for the recovery of this land was brought in 1856, and resulted in favor of the Seneca Nation. On the trial Governor Blacksnake, as he was named by Washington when he visited the capital in company with Cornplanter, testified,...

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Allegany Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

Allegany Reservation, lying in Cattaraugus County, New York, has remarkable features in very respect, and of great social and political concern. Besides resting under the burden of the Ogden Land Company pre-emption right to purchase whenever the Seneca Nation shall agree to sell its lands, it is already occupied in part by white people, who, in large numbers, hold duly legalized leases, running until May, 1892, and subject by recent act of Congress to renewal upon the consent of the parties thereto for a term not exceeding 99 years. Upon location of the New York, Lake Erie and Western...

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Reservations of the Six Nations in New York and Pennsylvania, 1723-1890

The accompanying map was prepared in 1771 under the direction of William Tryon, captain general and governor in chief of the province of New York, and is as nearly suggestive of the then recognized boundary of the Six Nations as any that has had official sanction. In 1851 Lewis H. Morgan, assisted by Ely S. Parker, a Seneca chief; and afterward an efficient staff Officer of General Grant, and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, prepared a map for a volume entitled League of the Iroquois, which aimed to define the villages, trails, and boundaries of the Five Nations as...

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Biographical Sketch of Albert H. Horton, Judge

Judge Albert H. Horton was identified with the State of Kansas for a period of more than fifty years in the most important phases of its civil and judicial development. His great influence extended from the year of its birth in 1861 to the time of his own death in 1902. For nearly twenty years of that period he served as chief justice of its Supreme Court. Judge Horton was born near Brookfield, New York, March 12, 1837, his ancestors being of an anceient English family, the first American representatives of which settled in New England. Albert received his preparatory education in New York and in 1855 entered the law departmont of the University of Michigan, but during his sophomore year was compelled to leave college because of an affection of his eyes. He was admitted to the bar at Brooklyn, New York, in 1860, and the same year moved to Atchison, Kansas, where he was soon appointed city attorney-In April, 1861, he was elected to that office on the republican ticket, and in September Governor Robinson appointed him judge of the Second Judicial District. Later he was elected to the position twice without opposition, but resigned to resume his law practlce. From 1861 to 1864 he was a member of the editorial staff of the Atchison Weekly Champion. In 1868 he was a republican presidential elector and in...

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Biography of Michael Dougherty

Michael Dougherty is one of the able industrious workers and business men who have identified themselves with the City of Independence because it is a center for the oil and gas industry of the Southwest. For forty years he had been a boilermaker, and had followed his trade as a workman and as a contractor in nearly all the oil and gas fields in the country. He is now superintendent of tankage construction for the Prairie Oil and Gas Company. He is a native of Ireland and of an old County Donegal family. His grandfather spent his life as a farmer in County Donegal. Michsel Dougherty was born in that county March 16, 1860. His father James Dougherty, who was born there in 1834, was for some years engaged in the stock trading business between Ireland and England. In 1868, leaving his family in Ireland, he came to America and settled near Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvanis. Here he became foreman in railroad construction, and he died near Wilkesbarre, in 1889. After becoming an American citizan he voted the democratie ticket, and was a member of the Catholic Church. James Dougherty married Eunice Moye, who was born in County Donegal in 1834 and died there in 1873. She was the mother of six childrcn: Mary is the wife of James McAdams, a stationary engineer living at Chicago, Illinois; the second is Michael;...

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Biographical Sketch of William Parks

One of the oldest pioneers of Malheur County and a man of excellent capabilities, being possessed of practical ability and judgment, and a keen discrimination that have made him a very successful business man and one of the leaders in the realm of finance in this section, the subject of this article is abundantly worthy of recognition and especial mention among the prominent men of Malheur County and this portion of Oregon, being also a man of worth and personal virtues. Mr. Parks was born in Brooklyn, New York, on June 7, 1845, being the son of Abraham and Jane Eliza (Vanderhoof) Parks. He was deprived of his mother when an infant but received his education and grew to manhood in his native place. It was in 1859 that he crossed the plains to California, locating in Eldorado County where he engaged in farming until 1864. Then he came to Silver City, Idaho and there took up mining until 1871, when he made his way to Jordan valley, now in Malheur County. He at once took a homestead and gave his attention to farming and stock raising. He was successful in that line and now he owns four hundred acres of fine, well improved and irrigated land adjoining the town of Jordan Valley. He has fine buildings and a large hand of cattle. In 1895 Mr. Parks engaged in...

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Biography of Collins Perryman

Among the most prominent and valued residents of his section of the state is Collins Perryman, of Juliaetta, a veteran of the civil war, and a citizen whose labors in behalf of the town of his abode have been most effective in advancing its interests. He was the pioneer hotel man, as a real-estate dealer has handled the greater part of its property, has done more than any other man in the locality to improve the roads through the surrounding country, and has always been watchful of the welfare and progress, doing all in his power to promote the growth and prosperity of the thriving little place. A native of the Empire state, Collins Perryman was born in Cattaraugus County, April 28, 1847, and is of English lineage. His grandfather sailed from England for the New World and was wrecked off the coast of Rhode Island, which led to his settlement in that state. His son, James Ferryman, the father of our subject, was born near Providence. Rhode Island, and married Miss Lucinda Kerkendall, who was born near Rochester. New York. In 1866 they removed to Michigan, where the father died October 6, 1872, at the age of sixty-five years, his wife surviving him until 1882, when she, too, was called to the home beyond, at the age of seventy-five years. They were farming people and were members of...

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Biography of A. Sidney Chase

A. Sidney Chase. Quite recently, by his own choice, Mr. Chase terminated an official career which had been continuous for twenty-four years in the office of probate judge of Ellsworth County. It was a long and honorable service and when considered in connection with Judge Chase’s well known integrity of character and other successful aceomplishments it stands as a credit to the entire State of Kansas. To a large degree Judge Chase is the architect of his own destiny, but he had that inestimable advantage of good birth and the inheritance that comes from solid and substantial old American stock. It was the same family which in a collateral branch produced the eminent Salmon P. Chase, secretary of the treasury under Lincoln and later Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court Judge Chase’s great-grandfather, John Chase, was a soldier in the provincial wars and also. in the Revolution. The grandfather, Silas Chase, not only fought in the Revolution but also in 1812. Judge Chase was born at Boston, Massachusetts, February 5, 1842, a son of Autumnus S. and Mary A. (Peterson) Chase, both of whom were natives of Massachusetts. Autumnus S. Chase was an officer in the United States Navy and was on duty during the Mexican war. In 1848 he went to California with a ship load of miners’ cabins, ready to put up. He landed in...

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Biography of Samuel Wayne Mather

Mather, Samuel Wayne; manufacturer; born, Schuyler, N. Y., July 27, 1849; son of Asaph and Betsy Emily Davis Mather; limited education; his father was seriously injured when he was young, so could not go to school, after he was 11 years old; went to work to help support the family; worked three years in the woods burning charcoal; moved to Cattaraugus County, N. Y., with his parents and tor five years worked on his father’s farm; married, Frankville, N. Y., Sept. 6, 1887, Addie Viola Cooley; issue, five children, two living, Addie and William; his first wife died July 9, 1902; married the second time, Cleveland, Jan. 24, 1907, Lora E. Rock; two children, Arlo and Arline; came to Cleveland at the age of 22, and went into the grocery business; was in the business two and one-half years, lost all his money, and was over $2,000 in debt; but did not go into bankruptcy, but paid all his debts, dollar for dollar, with interest; worked at carpenter work till 1877; then went to Philadelphia, and manufactured a fire lighter of his own patent for one and one-half years; sold out and went to Cambridgeport, Mass.; remained there one year manufacturing the fire lighters; in 1879, sold out his patent, and returned to Cleveland, and established the Union Ladder & Washboard Works; in 1882, began making caskets to sell...

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Biography of William Elliott Barnhart

William Elliott Barnhart, who has lived in Kansas City, Kansas, since 1887, has held many large responsibilities in connection with transportation lines, both urban and general railway companies, and has also regulated his private affairs so as to give time for much public service to his home city. His personal career has been one of many interesting experiences and achievements and his ancestry is also an appropriate matter of record. Mr. Barnhart was born at Cedar Valley in Wayne County, Ohio, December 8, 1857, a son of Frederick William and Clarisas (Gooding) Barnhart. The paternal ancestry goes back to his great-grandfather Johann Wilhelm Bernhardt. From the German Palatinate, now including chiefly Baden and Rhenish Bavaria, this ancestor emigrated on May 12, 1764, and settled in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. A son of Johann Wilhelm was Philippe Bernhardt, who served as a soldier in the War of 1812. Philippe’s wife was Elizabeth Rice, whose father, Frederick Rice, was a gallant soldier of the War of the Revolution and when he died at Wooster, Ohio, in February, 1848, he was accorded burial with the honors of war. The old family bible of Johann Wilhelm and of Philippe Bernhardt is now in the possession of Mr. Barnhart of Kansas City. About a hundred years ago the family name was changed from Bernhardt to Barnhart so that the spelling and pronunciation might conform. On...

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Biographical Sketch of Emmett Ellsworth Hart

Hart, Emmett Ellsworth; civil engineer; born, Little Valley, N. Y., Sept. 18, 1861; son of Austin and Dorleski Manley Hart; educated, public schools of N. Y. State, Cornell University, 1883-1887, degree C. E.; married, Little Valley, N. Y., April, 1891, Rachel Joy Sprague; issue, seven children; two years military training at Cornell University; entered the service of the C., B. Q. R. R., June, 1887; continued with them as draftsman, asst. engineer and division engineer, until November, 1895; general engineering practice, 1895-1897; employed by the U. S. government, 1897-1899 on Deep Water Ways surveys; in July, 1899, entered the employ of the New York, Chicago & St. Louis R. R. Co., as division engineer of the Eastern Division; in November, of the same year, made engineer of entire line for the same company; in 1906, made chief engineer, which position he still holds; member the Americal Railway Engineering Ass’n and Tau Beta Pi Cornell Honary...

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Biography of Henry R. Ransom

The Pittsburg Sash & Door Company. One of the very considerable industries of the City of Pittsburg is The Pittsburg Sash & Door Company, which like many successful concerns had a very modest heginning but is now contributing a great deal of wealth to the city and is furnishing support to many families whose members find employment there. This business was originally started as a bay press by L. N. Mosteller, now a retired business man of Pittsburg. In October, 1902, Henry R. Ransom arrived in Pittsburg and bought what was then known as the Pittsburg Planing Mill, situated at Fourth and Grand Avenue. Since then the business has been under the direction of the Ransom family, and during the past year its business has been so voluminous that its payroll amounts to $15,000. It has prospered and expanded continuously during the fifteen years since Henry R. Ransom took charge of the industry. The Ransoms were a colonial English family that settled first in Virginia. Later they lived in New York State. S. S. Ransom was born at Perrysburg, New York, and is still living now retired at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He was reared and married in Perrysburg, New York, and was for many years a traveling salesman. S. S. Ransom married Jennie Strickland, who was born in Ellinsville, Warren County, Pennsylvania. Henry R. Ransom, head of The Pittsburg Sash...

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Biography of Harry C. Weible

Harry C. Weible. When it is stated that Harry C. Weible moved out from Pennsylvania to Independence about thirteen years ago, it will be readily surmised that he is connected in some way with the oil or gas industry, and he is in fact one of the large oil producers in the Mid-Continent field and from his headquarters at Coffeyville directs extensive operations not only in Southern Kansas but in Oklahoma and Texas. Practically reared in the oil fields of Western Pennsylvania, he is the son of a veteran of the industry. Mr. Weible was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, January 16, 1858. He was still a child when his grandfather Weible died. His grandfather was born in Allegheny County in the very early days, and died there after a career as a farmer. He married a Miss Ferguson, who died in Allegheny County, and of their children the only one now living is William Weible, an uncle of Harry C., and a retired oil producer at Allegheny City. The Weibles came originally from Germany and settled in Pennsylvania in colonial times. Isaac Weible, father of Harry C., was born in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, in 1821. He was reared and married in his native locality, took up farming as his first vocation, and with the discoveries of oil in the western counties of his native state he entered the...

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Biography of W. W. Kaney

W. W. Kaney. In the career of W. W. Kaney, of Chanute, there is found an excellent illustration of the rewards that may be attained through industry and perseverance, for his had been a life in which achievements have been self gained and in which outside assistance had played no part. With but an indifferent education he started out in the world to make his own way when he was but a lad, and had steadfastly worked his way to a position of prominence as one of the leading oil producers of this part of Kansas. Mr. Kaney was born June 4, 1867, near Cuba, Cattaraugus County, New York, on an Indian reservation of 160 acres, and is a son of William and Mary (Dunkin) Kancy. His grandfather was Seraphim Kaney, who was born in Germany and came to the United States in young manhood, locating in Pennsylvania, where he passed the remainder of his life in agricultural pursuits, and died on his farm 2½ miles from Saltsburg, that state, in 1870. William Kaney was born in 1836, at Tarentum, Pennsylvania, and was there reared and received a public school education, and when still a young man went to Cattaraugus County, New York, where he was married. He was one of the pioneers of the oil industry in the United States, having drilled the third well ever sunk for...

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