Location: Carrollton Arkansas

Biography of J. Frank Seaman

J. FRANK SEAMAN. Among the reputable men of Galena who have made their home in Stone County since 1865, is J. Frank Seaman, whose birth occurred at Carrollton, Carroll County, Arkansas, October 1, 1847. His father, Hon. John F. Seaman, was born in Saratoga County, New York, in 1812, and was of Scotch origin. He remained in his native county until grown, and then became a driver on the Erie Canal. Following this, he became a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in 1834 emigrated to Michigan, where he resided two years. In 1836 he was appointed a missionary to the Cherokee Indians, and was in their nation for two years, after which he was transferred to the Arkansas conference. After a little he gave up his ministerial duties and began the study of medicine under Dr. Forest, of Huntsville, Madison County, Arkansas. Up to 1844 or 1845 he practiced medicine, and then engaged in merchandising at Carrollton. While there, he married Miss Sophia E. Kenner, August 18, 1846, and there remained until 1862, when, on account of his Union sentiments, it became unpleasant for him and he moved to Lawrence County, Missouri. There he resumed the practice of medicine and also tilled the soil until 1869, when he again embarked in merchandising, following this at Marionville, Missouri, until his death, which occurred suddenly, on March 27, 1870....

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Biography of Grover P. Watkins

Grover P. Watkins, engaged in the practice of law at Fort Gibson, was born at Carrollton, Arkansas, August 23, 1886, and is a son of Paschal T. and Eliza (Holt) Watkins, who were also natives of Arkansas. The father was a druggist and also a farmer, devoting his attention to the two lines of business at Carrollton. He served as a soldier throughout the Civil war with the Confederate forces and became an officer of the army. He died November 11, 1905, and is still survived by his wife, who makes her home in Green Forest, Arkansas. Grover P. Watkins was reared and educated in Carrollton and at the age of seventeen years began teaching school. He followed that profession for eight or nine years and during that time he devoted the hours which are usually termed leisure to the study of law. It was his desire to become an active practitioner at the bar and to this end he matriculated in the Chicago Law school, from which he was graduated with the class of 1903. He afterward went to Harrison, Arkansas, where he practiced for four years, and in 1917 he went to Muskogee. Here he was admitted to practice before the Supreme Court in 1918 and before the United States federal court in 1919. He formed a partnership with his uncle, John Watkins, who conducts the Muskogee...

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