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Location: Carroll County MO

Biographical Sketch of Richard L. C. Isherwood

Richard L. C. Isherwood, junior member of the firm, was born in Gloucestershire, England, December 6, 1856. His father was an officer of the Queen’s Revenue during about fifteen years. He came with his parents to the United States at the age of fourteen years, after having received his education at Millbrook Collegiate Institute, Devonshire, England. He located first at Carrollton, Missouri, where he spent four years learning and working at the tinner’s trade. Came to Jamesport in 1875, and soon after entered into partnership with Mr. Miller. Mr. Isherwood was married in Jamesport, October 18, 1878, to Miss Mary Gillilan daughter of John Gillilan. She was born in this county, May 6, 1859. Mr. Isherwood is a member of the I. O. O. F. lodge of Jamesport, and also of the A. O. U. W. This firm established their present business in 1879. They are energetic, enterprising merchants and carry a well selected stock of hardware and agricultural...

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Biography of John W. Burton

John W. Burton was born in Lawrence County, Indiana, November 29, 1842. His father, Eli Burton, is a native of North Carolina, and is now in the seventieth year of his age; his grandfather, John H. Burton, was a native of Virginia. Eli Burton migrated to Indiana, when a young man, bought a farm. on which was a small log house, and there the subject of this sketch was born, and there his father continues to live, but the log cabin has given way to a handsome modern residence, surrounded by the broad acres of a well-improved farm, instead of the thick, heavy timber of the early days. Upon this farm, J. W. Burton and his eight brothers were reared, and taught habits of thrift and industry, working in the summer and attending school in the winter. This school was taught in a log cabin of contracted dimensions, two miles distant from the old homestead, and there our subject received the elementary foundation of his education, which he afterward completed at the University of Michigan, where he graduated, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws, in 1868. At the breaking out of the war, in 1861, although but eighteen years of age, he volunteered for the defense of the Union, enlisting as a private in the Fiftieth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, served three years, and was promoted corporal for...

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Biography of Hon. Henderson Massie

HON. HENDERSON MASSIE, whose fine farm in Pike Creek Valley, Carter County, is an object of admiration to the section, came originally from the Buckeye State, his birth occurring in Jackson County in 1833. His parents, Lewis and Sarah (Mackley) Massie, were natives of Virginia and Ohio respectively, the father born in 1797, and the mother in 1807. Mr. Massie came to Ohio when a young man, married there, and there made his home for many years. Late in life he moved to Carter County, Missouri, and here his wife died in 1875, and he in 1888 when about ninety years of age. They were members of the United Brethren Church until they came to Missouri, when they became Methodists. Mr. Massie followed farming all his life, and was an active, industrious and honest citizen. Aside from farming he was also in the iron works for some time. His father, Moses Massie, probably died in Ohio, and our subject has no recollection of him. He and his wife came from Virginia at an early day, and were the parents of a large family. Grandfather, John Mackley, came from Pennsylvania to Ohio, and died in Jackson County when his grandson, Henderson, was a small boy. He was also a farmer. One of his sons, David Mackley, was a prominent lawyer, and for some time edited the Jackson Standard at Jackson,...

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Biography of Francis Marion Youngblood

FRANCIS MARION YOUNGBLOOD. There is something essentially American in the life and character of the gentleman who is the subject of this sketch. The United States has given rare opportunities to men with courage, honesty of purpose, integrity and energy to secure success. Francis Marion Youngblood has all the above characteristics, and his success as an agriculturist and citizen has come as his devotion to right and his tenacity of purpose. Mr. Youngblood was born in DeKalb County, Missouri, about 1838, son of Ambrose and Martha (Fanning) Youngblood, who resided for many years in Tennessee. From that State they moved to Illinois, and thence to northwest Missouri. When our subject was about six years old the parents came to Carroll (now Boone) County, and settled on Long Creek, where the father improved a good farm, and where he passed the remainder of his days, dying about 1882. His wife died in the same county a few years before. Mr. Youngblood was considerable of a hunter, and one of his reasons for settling in this section was on account of the game. The grandfather, James Youngblood, was probably a Revolutionary soldier, but very little is known of him. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Youngblood were named as follows: Nancy, wife of John Sharp, of Kansas; Jeremiah McClinton, a soldier in the Federal Army, now resides in Missouri; James...

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Biography of William Edward Davis

William Edward Davis is the youngest state auditor Kansas had ever had and one of the youngest men who ever held such an official dignity in any of the states. It may also be added, to express a general opinion current at the capital and over the state, that Mr. Davis’ administration as suditor had been a synonym of efficiency and economy. He represents that splendid type of young American manhood which had drawn attention by its capacity for accomplishment. Though most of his life had been spent in the Middle West, he was born in West Virginia, and his ancestors had lived there for several¬†generations. He was born on a farm in Hampshire County, July 14, 1875, a son of John William and Hannah Catherine (Timbrook) Davis. His paternal grandfather, Eli Davia, was born in what is now Hardy County, West Virginia, then Old Virginia. He married a Miss Evans. Gipson P. Timbrook, the maternal grandfather, married a Miss Hott. John W. Davis was born in Hardy County, West Virginia, May 26, 1851, while his wife was born in Hampshire County, July 12, 1854. Both parenta are still living, residents of Shawnee County, Kansas, removing there from Carroll County, Missouri, in November, 1915, and they naturally take much pride in the accomplishments of their son. When William E. Davis was nine years old, his parents moved to Carroll...

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Biography of William D. Casey

William D. Casey was admitted to the bar at Atchison before he was twenty-one years of age, and the expectations based upon his early attainments have been fully justified in his career as a lawyer during the past twenty-five years. Mr. Casey had long been an active leader in Atchison County affairs as well as a forceful and successful member of the bar. He was born in Carroll County, Missouri, November 19, 1871, a son of Warren Casey, who was born in New York State, where the family originally settled, in 1850. Warren Casey was reared in his native state, removed to Indiana, and in 1884 came to Atchison, Kansas. In Indiana he was connected with the hardware business but was a grocery merchant in Atchison, where he died in May, 1916. He was a republican, served several years in the Atchison City Council, and was a member of the Christian Church. His wife, whose maiden name was Harriet Ward, was born in Indiana in 1851 and is still living at Atchison. William D. Casey was the oldest of their children. Harry entered railroading, was a railroad brakeman, and was killed while in discharge of his dutics at the age of twenty-six. Ira died at Atchison when nineteen years of age; Frank D. lives in Atchison and is traveling representative of the Niles-Moser Cigar Company. William D. Casey grew...

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Houses of the Missouri Tribe

In the narrative of the Lewis and Clark expedition appears this record: “June 13, 1804. We passed a bend of the river. Missouri and two creeks on the north, called the Round Bend creeks. Between these two creeks is the prairie, in which once stood the ancient village of the Missouri. Of this village there remains no vestige, nor is there any thing to recall this great and numerous nation, except a feeble remnant of about thirty families. They were driven from their original seats by the invasions of the Sauks and other Indians from the Mississippi, who destroyed at this village two hundred of them in one contest.” 1Lewis and Clark, History of the Expedition under the command of Captains Lewis and Clark. . . Prepared for the press by Paul Allen. Philadelphia, 1814. 2 vols., I, p. 13. About 5 miles beyond they reached the mouth of Grand River which flows from the northwest, serves as the boundary between Carroll and Chariton Counties, Missouri, and enters the left bank of the Missouri River. Therefore the old village of the Missouri evidently stood at some point in the latter county. It was probably composed of a number of mat and bark covered lodges resembling the village of the Osage which stood a few miles farther up the river. Two days later, June 15, the party identified the site...

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Knapp, W. T. Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. W.T. Knapp passed away Sunday evening, Jan. 1, 1939, at the St. Anthony hospital in Pendleton after a major operation three months and four days ago. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. today at Hermiston, conducted by Rev. C. R. Moore and burial will be at Hermiston. Maggie Irene Bridwell was born seventy years ago, October 19, 1868 in Norborne, Missouri. She crossed the plains at the age of ten with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. David A. Bridwell, in a wagon train, coming to Union county. After a few years they moved to Wallowa County where she was united in marriage to William Thomas Knapp January 2, 1887. To this union was born five children. Guy Elmer, Hermiston; Edna A. Childers, deceased; Myrl B. Whitmore, Enterprise; Jenit Roberta Hoffnagle, Pendleton; Budd Homer, Hermiston. Mrs. And Mrs. Knapp were among the first settlers of Wallowa County and homesteaded near Leap 52 years ago this spring. Later they moved to Lostine and from there they took up farming in the Leap country. They reside here until 26 years ago and they moved to Umatilla County to Echo. In 1920 they moved to the Stanfield project where they lived 12 years and then moved to Hermiston six years ago where they resided at the time of Mrs. Knapp’s death. Her parents, David A. and Mary Frances (Hamilton) Bridwell...

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Biography of H. L. Kinnaman

H. L. Kinnaman. The present county treasurer of Chautauqua County is one of the oldest residents of that section of the state. More than forty years ago he began farming on some of the virgin acres of this county, and the careful study and energy he gave to the business brought him an ample competence besides providing liberally for his growing family. He is now a resident of the City of Sedan and had recently been chosen for a second term to the responsibilities of the county treasuryship. Mr. Kinnaman represents old American stock. His Kinnaman ancestors were German people and colonial settlers in North Carolina. Mr. H. L. Kinnaman was born in Madison County, Indiana, February 1, 1852. His father, H. L. Kinneman, Sr., was born in North Carolina January 2, 1809, a son of Walter Kinnaman, a native of the same state. In 1818 Walter Kinnaman and family came from North Carolina to the State of Ohio, and Walter subsequently lived in Indiana and Illinois, and died on his farm in the latter state. H. L. Kinnaman, Sr., grew up in Ohio, and in 1830 moved to Madison County, Indiana, where he married. He was one of the pioneers in that rich and picturesque section of Eastern Indiana, and prosperity came to him in generous measure. He was both a farmer and stock raiser. After the organization...

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Biography of Mark A. Leftwich

One of the well known newspaper men of the state is Mark A. Leftwich, proprietor of the Coweta Times-Star. He was born in Bedford county, Virginia, in May, 1852, a son of Thomas and Maria (Warwick) Leftwich, natives of Virginia. The father was an extensive planter and he served as Major in the Confederate army for three years. He was discharged at the termination of that time, because of poor health and he then went to Missouri, locating in Carrollton, Carroll county, where he became a dentist. He practiced there, enjoying substantial success, until his death, at the age of sixty-eight years. Mrs. Leftwich was sixty-four years of age at the time of her death. Mark A. Leftwich was reared and educated in Carrollton, Missouri, and Lebanon, Illinois, and after putting his textbooks aside he went to Texas, where he secured a position driving cattle across the country. He made several trips to Abilene and Baxter Springs, Kansas, and in 1868, between trips, he went to work on the “Examiner,” learning to set his first type. For five years he lived in Lexington, Nebraska, where he published the Dawson County Herald, and he then removed to Steelville, Missouri, where he published the Crawford County Democrat. For some time he published the Madison Times in Madison, Missouri, and in 1900 he came to Oklahoma, locating in Shawnee, where he published...

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Biography of Benjamin Franklin Strong, M. D.

Benjamin Franklin Strong, M. D. Now engaged in practice as a physician and surgeon at Chautauqua, Doctor Strong had a wide acquaintance in the two states of Kansas and Missouri, had practiced medicine in both states and had also a successful business record to his credit prior to his entrance into the medical profession. He was born in Sabula, Iowa, June 4, 1861. He represents an old American family. His first American ancestor was Elder John Strong, who was the founder of Northampton, Massachusetts. The Strong family originated in Scotland but this branch of it came from England. Many generations resided in the State of Vermont, and Doctor Strong’s grandfather was born at Bristol in that state. He was a shoemaker by trade, and afterwards moved to the province of Ontario, Canada, where he died. James Franklin Strong, father of Doctor Strong, was born in London, Ontario, in 1833, and his mother died with his birth. He was taken by his foster parents and from infancy was reared at Sabula, Iowa. He was also married in Jackson County, Iowa, near Sabula. A farmer all his life, he continued that business in Iowa until 1868, when he removed to Johnson County, Missouri, and in 1870 to Lafayette County in the same state. He gave up his active duties as a farmer in 1896, and removed to Canyon City, Colorado, where...

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