Location: Canada

Choctaw Traditions – The Council Fire, The Nahullo

The faces of the Choctaw and Chickasaw men of sixty years ago were as smooth as a woman’s, in fact they had no beard. Sometimes there might be seen a few tine hairs (if hairs they might be called) here and there upon the face, but they were few and far between, and extracted with a pair of small tweezers whenever discovered. Oft have I seen a Choctaw warrior standing before a mirror seeking with untiring perseverance and unwearied eyes, as he turned his face at different angles to the glass, if by chance a hair could be found lurking there, which, if discovered, was instantly removed as an unwelcome intruder. Even today, a full blood Choctaw or Chickasaw with a heavy beard is never seen. I have seen a few, here and there, with a little patch of beard upon their chins, but it was thin and short, and with good reasons to suspect that white blood flowed in their veins. It is a truth but little known among the whites, that the North American Indians of untarnished blood have no hair upon any part of the body except the head. My knowledge of this peculiarity was confined, however, to the Choctaws and Chickasaws alone. But in conversation with an aged Choctaw friend upon this subject, and inquiring” if this peculiarity extended to all Indians, he replied; “To all,...

Read More

Mound Builders

The types of the human skulls taken from those ancient mounds said to have been erected by a prehistoric race, and now called “Mound Builders” a race claimed to be far superior to our Indians are characteristic, not only of the ancient Mexicans, Peruvians and other ancient tribes of South America, but also of the ancient Natchez, Muskogee’s, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Cherokees, Seminoles, Yamases and others of the North American continent. And it is a conceded fact that all Indians ever found in North and South America possess many common features. I have seen the native Indians of Mexico, Arizona...

Read More

The Chickasaw War of 1739

Through the instigation of The French the war was continued between the seemingly infatuated and blinded Choctaws and Chickasaws during the entire year 1737, yet without any perceptibly advantageous results to either. A long and bitter experience seemed wholly inadequate to teach them the selfish designs of the French. No one can believe the friendship of the French for the Choctaws was unassumed. They were unmerciful tyrants by whatever standard one may choose to measure them, and without a redeeming quality as far as their dealings with the North American Indians go to prove; and their desire for the good of that race of people utterly out...

Read More

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and...

Read More

Biography of Frank T. Vaughan

Frank T. Vaughan, one of the younger lawyers of Newport, was born May 4, 1864, in Woodstock, Vt., son of Edwin and Elizabeth L. (Tenney) Vaughan. The father, who graduated at the Albany Law School, New York, followed the legal profession, and at the time of his death was Judge of Probate. Edwin Vaughan commenced his law practice in New York City; but in 1859 he removed to Claremont, N.H., and entered into partnership with Colonel Alexander Gardner. In 1861 he enlisted in the New Hampshire Battalion of the First Rhode Island Volunteer Cavalry, and was afterward transferred to the First New Hampshire Cavalry, with the rank of Captain. He remained in the service throughout the late war, acting at one time as Provost Marshal. Claremont, and was thereafter engaged in his profession until 1869. In that year he was appointed United States Consul to Canada, a post which he efficiently filled for twelve years. Upon his return to Claremont he was made Judge of Probate, and he afterward served as Representative to the State legislature. He was largely interested in educational matters, was liberal in religion, and he was a member in good standing of the A. F. & A. M. He died December 18, 1890. He and his wife had three children. One died in infancy; and Charles Edwin died at the age of twelve years, from...

Read More

How It Came About That I Went To Canada.

All things are wonderfully ordered for us by God. Such has been my experience for a long time past. If only we will wait and watch, the way will open for us. Where shall I begin with my history as a Missionary? When I was a child, it was my mother’s hope and wish that I should bear the glad tidings of the Gospel to distant lands. She was a Missionary in heart herself, and it was her earnest desire that one of her boys would grow up to devote himself to that most blessed work. However there seemed little likelihood of her wishes being fulfilled. I disliked the idea of going to Oxford as my brothers had done. A wild free life away from the restraints of civilization was my idea of happiness, and after studying agriculture for a year or two in England, I bade farewell to my native shores and started for Canada. Then God took me in hand. I had been only three days in the country when He put it into my heart to become a Missionary. The impulse came suddenly, irresistibly. In a few days it was all settled. Farming was given up, and I entered upon my course as a theological student. That same summer I spent a month or six weeks on an Indian Reserve, and became, as people would say,...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of George Godfrey

George Godfrey lived at Ritford, England. His son Peter married Dorothea Learey, of England, by whom he had Thomas, John, Edward, George, Charles, and Mary. Thomas came to America and settled in Canada. John went to California, and died on his return to England. Edward lives in Mercer County, Pa. George married Mary Ostick, of England, and settled in Pittsburg, Pa., in 1830, in St. Louis in 1836, and in Montgomery County, where Jonesburg now stands, in 1838. His children are Mary A., George, Edward, William O., John W., Henry M., and James A. Mary A. married Rev. George Smith, a Methodist minister, who came to Montgomery County in 1836. Mr. Godfrey has been a devoted Methodist for many years, and a leading member of his church. His brother Charles settled in Louisville, Kentucky, and his son, Charles, Jr., lives in Fulton,...

Read More

1851 Danville Canada Directory

A Village in the Township of Shipton, County of Sherbrooke,. District of St. Francis distant from Richmond, 9 miles from Sherbrooke, 34 miles. In the following Directory the names which appear in CAPITALS are those of subscribers to the work. Alphabetical List Of Professions, Trades, &C. Bontelle, James, cabinetmaker.% 9 Cleveland, C. B., general. dealer and postmaster.% 9 Fitch, _______, bailiff of superior court.% 9 Henning, H., mill owner. Parker, Rev. A. J., Congregationalist. Stockwell, J. & J., general...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Charles F. Foley

A member of the Kansas Public Utilities Commission since 1913, Charles F. Foley is a lawyer by profession, began practice thirty years ago at Lyons, and is a resident of that city. His duties, however, require his presence in Topeka much of the time. A native of Canada, educated in that country and at Boston, Massachusetts, he came at the age of twenty to Kansas in 1880 and by teaching school in the eastern section of the state earned enongh to defray his expenses at the University of Kansas. He was gradnated from the law department in 1884, then continued teaching two years more, and in 1887 began the practice of law at Lyons. In addition to building up a good practice he served as county attorney four years. Mr. Foley is a democrat, a member of the Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias, and is married and had one daughter. His larger public record began with his election to the State Legislature in 1896, and by re-election he served during the session of 1897-98-99. In 1909 Governor Stubbs appointed him regent of the University of Kansas, and four years later he was reappointed by Governor Hodges and served until July, 1913. On December 8, 1913, he was appointed by Governor Hodges a member of the Public Utilities Commission, and served as its chairman until April 1, 1915....

Read More

Boyd County, Kentucky

BOYD CO. (Carl F. Hall) The Commonwealth of Kentucky, having for a northern boundary the Ohio River-the dividing line between the northern free states and the southern slave states has always been regarded as a southern state. As in the other states of the old south, slavery was an institution until the Thirteenth Ammendment to the Constitution of the United States gave the negro freedom in 1865. Kentucky did not, as other southern states, secede from the Union, but attempted to be neutral during the Civil War. The people, however, were divided in their allegience, furnishing recruits for both the Federal and Confederate armies. The president of the Union, Abraham Lincoln, and the president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, both were born in this state. Boyd County was formed in 1860 from parts of Lawrence, Greenup and Carter Counties, and we are unable to find any records, in Boyd County, as to slave holders and their slaves, though it is known that many well to do families the Catletts, Davis, Poages, Williams and others were slave holders. Slaves were not regarded as persons, had no civil rights and were owned just as any other chattel property, were bought and sold like horses and cattle, and knew no law but the will of their white masters and like other domestic animals could be, and were, acquired and disposed of without...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Julia King

Interviewer: K. Osthimer Person Interviewed: Julia King Date of Interview: June 10, 1937 Location: Toledo, Ohio Place of Residence: 731 Oakwood Avenue, Toledo, Ohio Age: (about) 80 K. Osthimer, Author Folklore: Stories From Ex-Slaves Lucas County, Dist. 9 Toledo, Ohio The Story of MRS. JULIA KING of Toledo, Ohio. Mrs. Julia King resides at 731 Oakwood Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. Although the records of the family births were destroyed by a fire years ago, Mrs. King places her age at about eighty years. Her husband, Albert King, who died two years ago, was the first Negro policeman employed on the Toledo police force. Mrs. King, whose hair is whitening with age, is a kind and motherly woman, small in stature, pleasing and quiet in conversation. She lives with her adopted daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth King Kimbrew, who works as an elevator operator at the Lasalle & Koch Co. Mrs. King walks with a limp and moves about with some difficulty. She was the first colored juvenile officer in Toledo, and worked for twenty years under Judges O’Donnell and Austin, the first three years as a volunteer without pay. Before her marriage, Mrs. King was Julia Ward. She was born in Louisville, Kentucky. Her parents Samuel and Matilda Ward, were slaves. She had one sister, Mary Ward, a year and a half older than herself. She related her story in her own...

Read More

Biography of Asahel Strawn

The year 1860 saw the arrival of the Strawn family in Kansas and their settlement in Crawford County. They had come a long distance, traveling from Illinois in a covered wagon and one can well believe that the new home, although a primitive one, presented a pleasant sight to the weary travelers. Asahel Strawn and his wife, Bridget (Murphey) Strawn, with their five children, George W., William A., Betsey Ann, Mahala and Julia, made up the party. Asahel Strawn was born in Canada, a son of Joab Strawn, who was a descendant of William Penn and a Quaker. He went to Canada, perhaps from Pennsylvania, and there became the father of eight sons, each one of these being given a Biblical name and seven grew to maturity. In all probability it would have pleased him had his son Asahel selected a Quakeress for his bride, but it is not known that he objected to the admirable selection the son made. It was otherwise, however with Lanrence and Elizabeth (Harley) Murphey, who, being devout Catholies, could not consent that their daughter Elizabeth should marry outside the church. Therefore the young people had no other recourse than to run away and marry and this union proved one of lomestie happiness. The father of Mrs. Strawn was from County Wexford, Ireland, and was a soldier in the British army and fought at...

Read More

Biography of Hector Ross

In the town of Sherburne, and near the village of the same name, Chenango county, is a locality known as the “Quarter,” taking its name from the fact that it comprises one-quarter of the town. Here is located a thriving little manufacturing and trading settlement. By far the greater part of the life and prosperity of this place are due to the business capacity and the energy of the man whose portrait appears above. Hector Ross was born in Greenock, Scotland, in 1811. His father’s name was John Ross, who was a molder. living in Greenock. His mother’s maiden name was Isabel Melville. She was also a native of Scotland, and came to this country in the year 1844. With her came also two brothers of Hector Ross–William and George, and one sister, Bell, all residents of Binghamton. When Hector Ross first came to this country, in 1837, he landed in Canada, where he was employed for a brief time in a foundry. Leaving the Dominion, he crossed to Charlotte, and from there went to Rochester, walking the distance, as he was entirely out of funds. Finding no employment in Rochester, he started on foot eastward, but found nothing to do until he reached Brownell’s mills, in Oneida Co., where he worked one day, during the absence of one of the hands, who was known as a hand mule...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Samuel Simeon Andrews

Interviewer: Rachel A. Austin Person Interviewed: Samuel Simeon Andrews Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 86 For almost 30 years Edward Waters College, an African Methodist Episcopal School, located on the north side of Kings Road in the western section of Jacksonville, has employed as watchman, Samuel Simeon Andrews (affectionately called “Parson”), a former slave of A.J. Lane of Georgia, Lewis Ripley of Beaufort, South Carolina, Ed Tillman of Dallas, Texas, and John Troy of Union Springs, Alabama. “Parson” was born November 18, 1850 in Macon, Georgia, at a place called Tatum Square, where slaves were held, housed and sold. “Speculators” (persons who traveled from place to place with slaves for sale) had housed 84 slaves there – many of whom were pregnant women. Besides “Parson,” two other slave-children, Ed Jones who now lives in Sparta, Georgia, and George Bailey were born in Tatum Square that night. The morning after their births, a woman was sent from the nearby A.J. Lane plantation to take care of the three mothers; this nurse proved to be “Parson’s” grandmother. His mother told him afterwards that the meeting of mother and daughter was very jubilant, but silent and pathetic, because neither could with safety show her pleasure in finding the other. At the auction which was held a few days later, his mother, Rachel, and her two sons, Solomon Augustus and her infant who was...

Read More

Biography of George Woolsey Crane

After a long and useful career which made him one of the leading publishers of the Middle West, George Woolsey Crane died in Topeka January 30, 1913. For many years his name had meant much in Kansas. Several times he won victory out of defeat, and his career is an inspiring one because of the manner in which he triumphed over adversity. The best estimate of his life and work is found in the words of a biographer who was also his intimate friend. The following is a quotation from an article which appeared in one of the Topeka papers after his death. “The publishing house of Crane & Company bore the impress of George W. Crane. It was his house. It was built along lines marked out by him. It was always liberal and loved by the people of Kansas. The house was always fair, never grinding and contentions with creditors. It never lost its friends and no house in Kansas today is so widely known or better loved than the house of Crane & Company. “It had a reputation far beyond the bounds of the state. It is the oldest publishing house in the West, and not only the State of Kansas but the entire West owes George W. Crane a deept debt of gratitude. He published more books about Kansas and the West than any other...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest