Location: Cambridge Massachusetts

Descendants of Frederick Packard of Brockton, MA

FREDERICK PACKARD, late of Brockton, was not only one of the best known men in the line of shoe manufacturing in that city but also one of its most honorable and respected citizens. He ranked among the city’s most successful business men, one whose start in life was obtained by his energy and push, and these traits, combined with excellent business acumen, had long secured for him a position of affluence, and caused the firm of which he had so long been the head to become one of the best known in its line in the country. Mr. Packard...

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Wright Family of Boston, MA

WRIGHT. The family of this name is an early Boston family, which through marriage is allied with some of the historic families of New England, among them those of Adams, Winslow and Wentworth. We give herewith an outline of the earlier generations, beginning with the first ancestor in this country. (I) Richard Wright, born about 1607, died in Plymouth, Mass., June 9, 1691. In 1644 he married Hester Cook, and they had children: Adam, Esther and Mary. (II) Adam Wright, born about 1644, died Sept. 20, 1724. He was twice married, having by his first wife, Sarah (Soule), two children, John and Isaac, and by his second wife, Mehitable (Barrows), four children, Samuel, Moses, James and Nathan. (III) Samuel Wright, born about 1700, died Jan. 5, 1773. He was of Plympton. By his wife, Anna (Tillson), born about 1704, died Nov. 16, 1792, he had children as follows: Ruth, born Aug. 12, 1723; Ruth (2), March 1, 1725; Sarah, June 3, 1726 (married a Hall); Samuel, Oct. 6, 1728; Edmund, Oct. 28, 1730; Jacob, April 17, 1733; Lydia, Sept. 22, 1736. (IV) Jacob Wright, of Plympton, born April 17, 1733, son of Samuel and Anna (Tillson) Wright, died March 30, 1818. He married Deborah Torrey, of Weymouth, born Sept. 18, 1731, died Dec. 31, 1820. Children: Ann, born Jan. 1, 1753; Zadoc, April 17, 1754 (served in the Revolutionary...

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Early New England People

Sarah Titcomb over her years of study of various New England families had collected quite a bit of material of several early New England families. At the bequest of some of her friends, she prepared and published them in book form. When reading through the material I was impressed with the amount of material collected on each individual, and rather then a brief genealogical sketch, readers are provided an in-depth study of each early family: Ayer, Bartlett, Bradley, Chase, Dean, Dow, Dunster, Ellis, Fuller, Hope, Kilby, Martine, Les Dernier, Maverick, Mills, Montague, Pemberton, Pepperrell, Poore, Precott, Sewall, Longfellow, Spofford, Titcomb, Watmough, and Willard.

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Olcott Family of Norwich Vermont

Hon. Peter Olcott was born at Bolton, Connecticut, April 25, 1733; married Sarah, daughter of Peletiah Mills, Esq., of Windsor, Conn., October 11, 1759, and removed to that place in 1772. That year or the following one he came to Norwich, Vermont. He was the oldest of his parents’ four children (two sons and two daughters), and the only one of them to come to Norwich to reside. Mr. Olcott‘s name first appears in the town records of Norwich in 1773, when he was chosen one of the overseers of the poor, at the annual March meeting. He early took a leading part in public affairs in his new home. He was elected to the most important town offices, and soon came to be regarded as one of the leading men of the place. It is probable that he was a man of considerable means when he came to Norwich, which, united with his superior talents, gave him a commanding influence in the community. The next year (1774) the annual town meeting was held at his house, and such meetings continued to be so held until 1779, after which they were held at the meeting house, except in severe winter weather. Probably his influence was potent in fixing the location of the first meeting house very near to his residence and upon land which he gave for a site....

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Biography of Margaret Fuller

MARGARET FULLER, the first child of Timothy Fuller and Margaret Crane, was born May 23, 1810, in the house now (1902) numbered 71, Cherry St., Cambridge. After her father’s death she was her mother’s chief stay; for, though of very little business experience, and with a natural aversion to financial affairs, she had a strength of mind and courageous firmness which stayed up her mother’s hands when the staff on which she had leaned was stricken away. It had been the life-long desire of Margaret to go to Europe and complete her culture there, and arrangements with this view had been matured at her father’s death. Her patrimony would have still sufficed for the desired tour; but she must have left her mother sinking under a sense of helplessness, with young children to educate. Margaret, after a struggle between a long-cherished and darling project and her sense of duty, resolved to give up her own brilliant hopes and remain with her mother. She applied herself personally to the academic training of the children, who learned from her the rudiments of the classic languages and the first reading of some of their great authors. We extract from the “Mount Auburn Memorial” the following “Her wonderful power of conversation lives in memory alone. It is said that there has been no woman like her in this respect since Madame de Stael;...

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Biographical Sketch of Eugene Fuller

Of EUGENE FULLER, the second child of Timothy Fuller and Margaret Crane, the following notice taken from the annual obituary college record, by Joseph Palmer, M.D., published by the “Boston Daily Advertiser,” gives some account: – “Eugene Fuller, the eldest son of Hon. Timothy and Margaret (Crane) Fuller, was born in Cambridge, Mass., May 14, 1815. After leaving college in 1834, he studied law, partly at the Dane Law School in Cambridge, and partly in the office of George Frederick Farley, Esq., of Groton, Mass. After his admission to the bar, he practiced his profession two years in Charlestown, Mass. He afterwards went to New Orleans, and was connected with the public press of that city. He spent several summers there, and, some two or three years ago was affected by sun-stroke, which resulted in softening of the brain, and ultimately in a brain fever, which came very near proving fatal, and left him in a shattered condition. His friends hoping that medical treatment at the north might benefit him, he embarked, with an attendant, on board the Empire City for New York. When one day out, June 21, 1859, his attendant being prostrated with seasickness, Mr. Fuller was left alone, and was not afterwards seen. He must have been lost...

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Biographical Sketch of Rev. Bradford Leavitt

Rev. Leavitt is a minister of the Gospel; he is indeed more than this, for he is the pioneer in a new vocation in which his qualifications as a minister fit him for the perfect administration of his self imposed combined duties of clergyman and funeral director. When Rev. Leavitt entered this new field comparatively recently, opinion was divided as to the wisdom of his decision. Today the many hundreds whom he has served in this double and truly Christian role will testify that he was most certainly right in his decision; as he has proved that he could with his dual qualifications lessen the burden of grief attendant upon the last rites of those who pass away. Rev. Leavitt was born in 1868 in Boston, Mass. He came to California when a comparatively young man and has been a resident of Woodside for the last ten years. In 1893 he was married in Cambridge, Mass. The Rev. Leavitt was pastor of the First Unitarian (Star King) Church in San Francisco from 1900 to 1914 where his sermons and the administration of the affairs of the church attracted widespread comment of the most favorable nature. At the present day the Rev. Leavitt occupies the position as vice president of the N. Gray and Company of San Francisco and is the manager of the Burlingame and South San Francisco branches...

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Biography of John H. Hunt

John H. Hunt, a prominent farmer and a well-known veteran of Hill, was born in Dorchester, N.H., January 8, 1826, son of Jonathan and Eliza (Holmes) Hunt. His grandfather, who was born in Lexington, Mass., kept a tavern at the time Washington took command of the Continental army. Jonathan Hunt was a carriage-builder, and also kept a lumber wharf at East Cambridge, Mass., until the Lowell railroad was built. He died at Hopkinton, N.H., at the age of eighty-four years. He first married Hannah Larkin, of Lexington, Mass. His second wife, in maidenhood Eliza B. Holmes, was the mother of John H. Hunt, who is the only child. As his father was living in East Cambridge during his son’s boyhood, John Hunt obtained his education in the schools of that town. After leaving school he went to sea, and when only twenty-three years old he was master of a vessel. Subsequently for five years he traded on the east and west coasts of Africa. During Mr. Hunt’s sea life he had some thrilling experiences. While sailing in the ship “United States,” Captain Calvin G. Worth, the ship was wrecked, and the crew were without food and water for two days and two nights. Finally they succeeded in making a landing on Tongataboo, one of the Friendly Islands, where they remained three months. They then went to Eoa, another island...

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Genealogy of Howard Baker of Solon Maine

Genealogy of Howard Baker W170 HOWARD BAKER: b. in Maine, July 12, 1810; d. Jan. 1889-served in Civil War; m. on Dec. 9, 1840, to Maria Boice, of Maine, b. November 22, 1820, d. April 4, 1910, at time of marriage a school teacher in Cambridge, Mass.; 7 children. Gardiner Bowen: b. in Solon, Maine, Nov. 30, 1842; struck by truck and killed May 4, 1847. Mary Ella: b. in Solon, Me., Jan. 13, 1845, still living in Avon, Mass.; m. Ira May; 7 children. Alice: d. Sept., 1927. William: m. Pearl; 4 children-Emmery, Ira, Marion and Muriel. Emma: m.; d.; left no heirs. Mabel and Charles. 2 children died in infancy. Charles Howard: b. Solon, Me., Feb. 2, 1847; d. Aug. 1, 1918 served as drummer boy in Civil War, State Congressman in Mass.; 3 children-all living. Bessie M. Whipple of Swampscott, Mass. Chas. H. of Lynn. P. H. of Swampscott. Winfield Scott: b. Solon, Maine, March 24, 1849, d. May, 1917; m. Lydia; 2 children. Lottie: m. Arthur Barnes, who d. Apr., 1926, her present address is Orris St., Melrose Highlands, Mass. Child Lydia, b. Aug., 1914. Winfield: m. Alice Randall; 3 children. Helen: b. Aug. 31, 1900; d. July, 1922. Edith: b. Sept., 1905; d. Oct., 1905. Grace: b. Sept., 1908. Millard Fillmore: b. in Randolph, Mass., Jan. 6, 1851; m. Hattie Dizer; present address St....

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Simon Willard Genealogy

The Willard Memoir [Joseph Willard], Soldiers in King Philip’s War [George M. Bodge], History of Cambridge [Paige], History of Concord [Shattuck], History of Groton [Butler], New England Historical and Genealogical Register, all give interesting accounts of Major Simon Willard, one of the finest types of a Puritan, living in New England in the middle of the seventeenth century [1634-76]. Simon Willard Simon1 Willard was b. at Horsmonden, County Kent, England; bap. April 17, 1605. He was the son of Richard Willard by wife Margery, and brother of Margery [Willard] Davis, who married, in England, DOLAR DAVIS. The family name in England is very old. It may be found in the Domesday Book. Simon Willard m., in England, Mary, dau. of Henry and Jane [Ffielde] Sharpe, who was the mother of nine children. She was b. at Horsmonden; bap. Oct. 16, 1614; she d. at Newtowne [Cambridge]. He m. second Elizabeth Dunster, who d. in six months; m. third Mary Dunster, sister of Henry Dunster, first president of Harvard College. He mentions in his will “my sister Willard, and all her children.” Mary [Dunster] Willard was living when her brother Henry’s will was probated. She was the mother of eight children, by Willard, born between 1649-66. She m. second, July 14, 1680, Dea. John Noyes of Sudbury, Mass., and d. in that town, Dec., 1715. Simon Willard was living in...

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Samuel Woods Genealogy

I. Samuel1 Woods of Cambridge, Mass., b. abt. 1636; went to Groton, Mass., in 1662; d. in Groton, Mar. 19, 1712; m. in Cambridge, Mass., Sept. 28, 1659, Alice Rushton, b. abt. 1636. Seven ch.: the first b. in Cambridge, the others in Groton, Mass. II. Samuel2 Woods, son of Samuel1, I, b. Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 3, 1661; m. in Chelmsford, Mass., Dec. 30, 1685, Hannah Farwell, b. Chelmsford, Mass., Jan. 20, 1667-8; dau. of Joseph and Hannah (Learned) Farwell. She m. (2), Capt. Peter Joslin of Lancaster, Mass. Peter’s first wife was slain by the Indians who attacked her home, July 18, 1692, in Lancaster. Samuel and Hannah Woods had eight ch., the oldest. III. Samuel3 Woods, b. (place and date unknown); d. Groton, Mass., Apr. 10, 1773; m. Nov. 29, 1720, Patience Bigelow, b. Sept. 30, 1698, probably dau. of James and Elizabeth (Child) Bigelow of Watertown, Mass. She d. in Groton, Mass., Jan. 23, 1771. Eight ch. b. Groton. IV. William4 Woods, son of Samuel3, III, b. Groton, Oct. 17, 1735; d. Keene, Mar. 23, 1818; m. Feb. 9, 1757, Naomi Longley, b. Chelmsford, Mass., May 18, 1741; d. Keene, Sept. 8, 1815; dau. of Nathaniel and Lydia (Foster) Longley. Their ch. were: Naomi5, b. Chelmsford, Mass., May 18, 1759, bur. Oct. 16, 1759. William5, b. Chelmsford, May, 1761, slain in the battle of Bennington, Aug....

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Biography of Prof. William H. Carruth

Prof. William H. Carruth, one of the leading linguistic seholars and authors of the West, had held the chair of German Language and Literature of the University of Kansas since its creation over thirty years ago. He was born on a farm near Osawatomie, Kansas, April 5, 1859, the son of James H. and Jane (Grant) Carruth. His father, from whom he in herited his love of books, was a home missionary of the Presbyterian Church, and from his mother he inherited courage, energy and an independent disposition. He worked his way through school and college, graduating at the University of Kansas in 1880. In the fall of that year he began teaching in the university as assistant in modern languages and literature, and in 1882 he was elected professor of modern languages. In 1884 this department was divided, one branch embracing French and the other German, and Professor Carruth remained at the head of the latter. In 1886 he spent a year of study abroad at Berlin and Munich. Three years later he was Morgan fellow at Harvard for a year, receiving the degree of A. M., and in 1893 that of Ph. D. from the same institution. He is an able translator and had edited several volumes of college texts. In 1887, with F. G. Adams, Professor Carruth published an account of municipal suffrage in Kansas. In...

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Dolar Davis of Cambridge, Massachusetts

F114 DOLAR DAVIS: came to America from the county of Kent, England, 1634. Settled at Cambridge, Mass. He was b. 1593; d. 1673; m. (1), Margery Willard, 1624, and m. (2), Joanna Bursley. (1) John: b. 1626. (2) Simon: b. 1636; d. 1713; Lieut. of militia; in command of Concord men at the Brookfield fight with Indians, 1675. He m. Mary Blood, 1660. (A) James: b. 1668; d. 1727; farmer of Concord; m. Anne Smedley, 1700. (a) Thomas: b. 1705; d. 1786; farmer of Concord; captain of militia and selectman, 1762; m. Sarah Jones, 1725. 1. Josiah: b. 1750; d. 1815; farmer; served during Revolu­tion. In 1772 m. Abigail Hubbard (1754—1844). A. Charles: b. 1797; d. 1865; Trader at Concord and inspector in Boston Custom House. In 1829 m Lucy Hunt, dau. of a Revolutionary soldier. a. Charles Wilder: b. 1833; d. 1898. Adjutant in 51st Ill. Infantry, becoming Colonel in 1865. Provost Marshall General, Dept. of Missouri, 1864. Present at many engagements and received surrender of General Thompson in Northern Arkansas. In 1870 he m. Emma Moore, dau. of a prominent horticulturist of Concord. (I) Bradley Moore: b. 1871. Add: 2015 Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor, Mich. [See Ch. (J)]. (B) Simon: m. Elizabeth Woodhouse. Had, with other issue (a) Simon: m. Phoebe Aldrich. Had, with other issue 1. Simon: b. 1759; d. 1842; served in Revolutionary War; m....

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Slave Narrative of Margaret E. Dickens

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Margaret E. Dickens Location: Raleigh, North Carolina (1115 E. Lenoir St.) Date of Birth: June 5th, 1861 My name is Margaret E. Dickens and I was born on the 5th of June 1861. My mother wuz free born; her name wuz Mary Ann Hews, but my mother wuz colored. I don’t remember anything about Marster and Missus. My father was named Henry Byrd. Here is some of father’s writing. My mother’s father was dark. He had no protection. If he did any work for a white man and the white man didn’t like it, he could take him up and whup him. My father was like a stray dog. My name was Margaret E. Byrd before I got married. Here is some of father’s writing–“Margaret Elvira Byrd the daughter of Henry and Mary Ann Byrd was born on the 5th June 1861.” My grandfather, my mother’s father was a cabinet maker. He made coffins and tables and furniture. If he made one, and it didn’t suit the man he would beat him and kick him around and let him go. Dis was told to me. My father was a carpenter. He built houses. I can read and write. My father could read and write. My mother could read, but couldn’t write very much. I have heerd my mother say when she heerd the...

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Biographical Sketch of Alger, Alpheus B.

Alger, Alpheus B., son of Edwin A. and Amanda (Buswell) Alger, was born in Lowell, Middlesex County, October 8, 1854. His early education was accomplished at the public schools of his native place. In the Lowell high school he fitted for college, and was graduated at Harvard with the class of 1875. The same year he entered the Harvard law school, and a year later continued the study of the law in the office of the Hon. Josiah G. Abbott of Boston. He was admitted to the bar in 1877, and began the practice of law in connection with his father’s firm, Brown & Alger, in the city of Boston, with his residence in Cambridge. Mr. Alger has been actively identified with the Democratic Party in politics. He has held the positions of chairman and secretary of the Democratic city committee of Cambridge. He is also a member of the congressional district committee. In 1884 he was chosen alderman, and acted on the committees on claims, police, ordinances, and a new bridge to Boston. In 1886 and ’87 he was a member of the Senate, serving as chairman on the committee on engrossed bills and mercantile affairs, and as member of the committees of public service, expediting legislative business, judiciary, bills on the third reading, rules and liquor law. He was also a member of the state committee sent...

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