Location: Callaway County MO

Biographical Sketch of John B. Williams

John B. Williams was the son of Cordey and Mary Williams, was born upon a farm in Callaway county, Missouri, August 11, 1844. When he was two years old his parents removed to Montgomery county and settled on a farm near Danville, where he lived until seven years of age. In the spring of 1853 his parents again changed their place of residence, this time moving to Gentry county, near Albany, where he lived until he reached his seventeenth year, when, in 1861, he enlisted in the Union army, joining Colonel Manlove Cranor’s regiment of six months militia. At the expiration of that time he enlisted in Company A, First Regiment of Missouri State Volunteer Infantry, and served three years, part of the time on detail duty as clerk in the adjutant general’s office at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, where he was mustered out when his time expired. Leaving St. Louis he went to Mexico, Missouri, and established himself in the drug business with his brother, under the name and style of R. N. Williams & Bro., doing business eighteen months, when they removed to Albany, Gentry county, and carried on the drug business one year. In 1867 they removed to Gallatin, where they continued in the same business until 1868, when his brother retired from the firm, and six years later be also sold out. In 1876 he...

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Biographical Sketch of George Tuggle

The subject of this sketch,¬†George Tuggle, is a native of Daviess county, and was born September 19, 1848. He lived with his parents on the farm until he reached his fifteenth year, when the spirit of adventure taking possession of him, he ran away from home and started out to seek his fortune in the wild West Denver, Colorado, was to be his destination, but before reaching the boundary line of that great mineral State, the wagon-train which he accompanied became snow-bound and was forced to abandon the trip. Nothing daunted at this disastrous turn of affairs, George bravely faced about and journeyed homeward from Nebraska City, Nebraska, on foot, and thus brought to an end his thoughts of a life in that country. He received an elementary education in the public schools of Monroe township, supplemented by an attendance at the district school at Barnesville, Clinton county, for one year, and completed by a four years course in the Westminster College, at Fulton, Missouri, graduating in 1874 from the scientific department. Returning home he devoted his energies to work upon the farm in summer and teaching school in winter, until the spring of 1876. In this last mentioned year Mr. Tuggle was appointed deputy county clerk by John P. Smith, remaining during that gentleman’s term of office, and was appointed to the same position by his successor, P....

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Biographical Sketch of Wilburn K. Nation

Wilburn K. Nation was born near Lexington, Kentucky, July 1, 1817. His father was a native of South Carolina. When he was a child his parents moved to Claiborne county, Tennessee, and in 1833 to Callaway county, Missouri, and in 1835 to this county. He participated in driving out the Mormons from this county, and was at the battle of Honn’s Mill, in Caldwell county. Mr. Nation was united in marriage, November 8, 1841, to Miss Nancy Tarwater, who was born September 23, 1818, and is the daughter of John Tarwater, who was the third white man that settled in this county, and who started the first ferry on Grand River in Daviess county; he settled in this county February 25, 1830. She is the oldest settler to-day in this county. By this union they have eleven children: Lithey M., born August 14, 1842; Phoebe A., born August 1, 1844; John C., born September 2, 1846; William E., born November 13, 1848; Isaac H., born January 3, 1851; Ruth J., born June. 12, 1853; Mary O., born August 28, 1855; Nancy C., born October 8, 1857; Sarah E., born August 21, 1860; Wilburn K., born December 8, 1862; and Louisa M., born April 10, 1865. Mr. Nation has made farming his business through...

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Biographical Sketch of Nathaniel Maughs

Nathaniel Maughs was of Loudon County, Va. His children were David, William, John, Moses, Elijah, Stephen, Vinson, Mary, Sally, and Eli. Mr. Maughs removed from Virginia to Fleming County, Ky., and his children all came with him. David and William were Baptist preachers, and the former settled in Lincoln County, Mo. Elijah married .Mary Smith, by whom he had-Mordecai M., Milton M., Sophronia F., Lucinda S., Elijah C., Daniel M., and Mary S. V. Mr. Maughs died, and his widow married his brother Stephen, who settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1822. They had Jerry S. D. S., and George M. B. Mordecai Maughs, who was a physician, was married first to the widow Jane Scott; second to Dorothea Stephenson, and third to Lizzie Offutt. He had sixteen children in all. The Doctor was an educated, intelligent man, full of wit and humor, and very fond of practical jokes. He lived at Danville for many years, but finally removed to Callaway County, where he died. Sophronia Maughs married Dr. William Proctor, of St. Louis. Mary V. S. was married first to Henry Davault, and second to Willis Loyd, both old settlers of Montgomery County. Jerry died a bachelor in Montgomery County. George M. B., son of Stephen Maughs, is a physician. He married Anna Anderson, of Callaway County, and settled in St. Louis, where he has become distinguished in...

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Biographical Sketch of Jacob Patton

Jacob Patton and his wife, Rebecca Barnett, of North Carolina, had four children James, Thomas, Mary, and Rebecca. They settled on Loutre Island, in Montgomery County, in 1810. James, the eldest son, married Violet Douglass, and they had-Robert, William, Jesse, Samuel D., Amelia, Cynthia A., and Violet. Jesse married Nancy Burrell, and lives in Boone County. Amelia married Eli Johnson, and is now a widow in Callaway County. The rest of James Patton’s children are dead. Thomas, brother of James Patton, was bitten by a mad wolf, at his home on Loutre Island, in January, 1816, and died of hydrophobia on the 16th of the following August, in the 43d year of his age. His wife died in December, 1867, in her 90th year. Their Children were James, William, Robert H., Thomas H., Elizabeth, Rebecca, Jane, Violet, and Mary. Rebecca, daughter of Jacob Patton, married John Gibson. She is now in her 88th year, a widow, and resides in Callaway County. Mary married Thomas Patton, and their children were James B., William, Robert H., Thomas H., Eli M., Elizabeth, Rebecca, Jane, Violet, and...

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Biographical Sketch of Peter Nunnelly

Peter Nunnelly was a “bound boy” to a horse doctor and jockey, and was with Lord Cornwallis’ army at Yorktown, when it was captured. After the war he settled in America, and was married twice; first to Elizabeth Smart, by whom he had Peter, Jr., Absalom, Benjamin, Gillum, Buckner, Littleberry, James, Ephraim, Mildred, Martha, and Judith. Ephraim married Elizabeth Williams, and his son Ephraim married Eveline Scholl, and lives in Callaway County. His children were James, Anderson, Daniel, John, Lucy, Mary H., Elizabeth, Sarah L., and Susan A. James is a bachelor, and lives in Montgomery County. Anderson married Violet Patton, and lived and died in Montgomery County. Daniel married Catharine Lee. John and Lucy died young. Mary H. married John McMahan. Elizabeth married Granville Nunnelly, her cousin. Sarah L. married Benjamin F. Leavell. Susan A. married Granville L....

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Biography of Abraham Snethen

Abraham Snethen and his wife, Elizabeth Stewart, were natives of Germany. They emigrated to America and settled in New Jersey, where they had eleven children, of whom the names of only seven are now remembered. They were William, John, Reuben, Polly, Lydia, Elizabeth, and Margaret. William married and settled in Kentucky in 1792, and in 1810 he removed to Ohio, where he lost his wife. He then started to return to New Jersey, but died of cholera, at Hagerstown, Md. John was born in March, 1789, and when he was eight years old his mother died. He was then bound out to a man in Elizabethtown, N. J., to learn the trade of wheel-wright. He remained with the man seven years, and then having had a misunderstanding with his landlady, he ran away and went to Philadelphia, where he embarked on board a ship as a sailor He followed the sea seven years, and during the latter part of that period, while the ship was returning from the West India Islands, with a cargo of sugar and coffee, the yellow fever broke out among the crew and all of them died except Snethen, the cook, and one sailor. They succeeded, however, in bringing the vessel safely into port, and delivering her to the owners, whose admiration of Snethen’s bravery and skill was so great that they proposed to educate...

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Biography of Peter VanBibber

Peter and Isaac VanBibber, of Holland, came to America and settled in Botetourt Co., Va., previous to the revolution. Peter married Marguety Bounds, and they had Peter, Jr., Jesse, Jacob, James, Joseph, Matthias, Nancy, Sophronia, Ellen, and Olive. James married Jane Irvine, and settled in St. Charles County in 1803. He was Coroner at the time William Hays was killed by his son-in-law, James Davis. In 1817 he removed to Callaway County, and settled on the Auxvasse. His children were Joseph, Irvine, Frances. Lucinda, Melissa, Daniel and Minerva. Joseph was a surveyor and made the government surveys in range eight, west of the fifth principal meridian. Olive VanBibber married Nathan Boone. Isaac VanBibber, Brother of Peter, was Captain of a company in the battle of Point Pleasant, in 1774, and was killed there. He left, a widow and four children John, Peter, Isaac and Rebecca. John and Peter married and settled in Powell’s Valley, East Tennessee. Isaac was born in Greenbriar Co., Va., October 20, 1771, and was only two and a half years old when his father was killed. He was adopted and raised by Colonel Daniel Boone, and at the early age of thirteen years acted as a scout against the Indians in Virginia. In 1800 he came to Missouri with Nathan Boone, and settled first in Darst’s Bottom. During the Indian war he was Major of...

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Biographical Sketch of Col. John Smith

Col. John Smith, of the revolutionary war, lived in Franklin County, Virginia, here he married Frances Burk by whom he had William, Stephen, John, Wyatt, Henry, Susan, Mary, and Frances William married Elizabeth Ferguson, of Virginia, by whom he had Samuel, Thomas, Stephen, William H., Mary, Frances, Susan, Martha, Elizabeth, Sarah P., and Julia. Mary married Keincol C. Gilbert, who settled in Callaway County. Frances married Colonel Peter Booth of Kentucky: Susan married Colonel F. A. Hancock, who settled in Alabama. Martha married Thomas J. Holland, who settled in Montgomery County in 1832. He represented the County in the State Legislature one term, and was Justice of the Peace in Warren County for a number of years. He died in 1862. Sarah P. Smith married her cousin, Wright Smith, who settled in Warren County in 1837. Julia married John Craighead, who settled in Callaway...

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Biography of James Fulkerson

Fulkerson (This name in the native tongue, was Volkerson, but after the removal of the family to America they began to spell it as it is pronounced.) James Fulkerson, of Germany, came to America at an early date and settled in North Carolina. There he became acquainted with and married Mary VanHook, and subsequently removed to Washington Co., Va. The names of their children were Peter, James, John, Thomas, Abraham, Jacob, Isaac, William, Polly, Catharine, Hannah, and Mary. Peter married Margaret Craig, and they had Polly, Robert C., James, Benjamin F., Jacob, Peter, Jr., John W., Margaret, Rachel, David C., and Frederick. Of these children Robert C., Benjamin F., and Frederick settled in Missouri. The former (Robert C.) was born in Lee Co., Va., August 27, 1794. He served as a soldier in the war of 1812, was afterward elected Colonel of militia, and took part in the Black Hawk war in 1834. He first came to Missouri in 1816, with Major Benjamin Sharp, but remained only a short time, when he returned to Virginia, where he resided until 1828. During that period he served his County for seven years in the capacity of Sheriff, an office which at that time was beset with many dangers and hardships, requiring a man of nerve and determination to discharge its duties. So faithful was he in the performance of his labors,...

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Biographical Sketch of Benjamin Ellis

Benjamin Ellis settled on South Bear creek in 1815. He was a wheelwright and chair maker, and also had a hand-mill. He had ten children. James Ellis settled on Bear creek in 1819. He married Elizabeth Bowen, and they had six children Edmund, Benjamin, Leeper, William, Fanny, and Martha. Benjamin married Catharine McGarvin, and now lives in Callaway...

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Biographical Sketch of George Godfrey

George Godfrey lived at Ritford, England. His son Peter married Dorothea Learey, of England, by whom he had Thomas, John, Edward, George, Charles, and Mary. Thomas came to America and settled in Canada. John went to California, and died on his return to England. Edward lives in Mercer County, Pa. George married Mary Ostick, of England, and settled in Pittsburg, Pa., in 1830, in St. Louis in 1836, and in Montgomery County, where Jonesburg now stands, in 1838. His children are Mary A., George, Edward, William O., John W., Henry M., and James A. Mary A. married Rev. George Smith, a Methodist minister, who came to Montgomery County in 1836. Mr. Godfrey has been a devoted Methodist for many years, and a leading member of his church. His brother Charles settled in Louisville, Kentucky, and his son, Charles, Jr., lives in Fulton,...

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Biography of Jebez Ham

Jabez Ham, brother of John, was born in Madison Co., Ky., in 1797, and came to Missouri in 1817. He had no education, was of a roving disposition, and did nothing for several years but hunt and fish. His mind was naturally bright, and if he had been educated he would have made a remarkable man. Rev. Aley Snethen and Lewis Jones taught him the alphabet and learned him to read, and in 1824 he began to preach, having united with the Old or Hard Shell Baptist Church. In 1826 he organized a church of that denomination on Loutre Creek, and called it New Providence. For some time after he began to preach he always carried his gun with him when he went to church, both on week clays and Sundays, and often killed deer on his way to and from his preaching places. He also manufactured powder, which he had a ready sale for at high prices; and by this means and from the proceeds of his rifle he made a living and did well. He was a large, stout man, and often added emphasis to his opinions by the use of his fists. On a certain occasion he forgot the text that he had intended to preach from, and when he arose in the pulpit he announced the fact by saying to the congregation that he had...

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Biography of Stephen Ham

Stephen Ham lived and died in Madison Co., Ky. He was the father of John, Jabez, and Stephen Ham, Jr. John was born in Kentucky in 1786, and came to Missouri in 1809, and settled in St. Charles County. He joined Nathan Boone’s company of rangers, and served during the Indian war. In 1816 he and Jonathan Crow built a bark tent on Auxvasse creek, now in Callaway County, and lived in it for some time, while they were engaged in hunting. They were, therefore, probably the first American settlers within the limits of Callaway County. Ham cut his name on a lone tree in the prairie, which has since borne his name. He was a Methodist preacher. He was married twice, first to a Miss Bennett, by whom he had two children. She died when the children were quite small, and their father took them to their relatives in Kentucky, performing the journey on horse-back, with one of the children before him and one behind. When he came to water courses that were deep enough to swim his horse, he would tie one of the children on the bank, swim across with the other, tie it, and go back for the one he had left. He afterward married a Miss Thomas, and they had six daughters. Mr. Ham was a daring hunter, and there were but few who...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel Gill

Samuel Gill, whose father lived in Maryland, settled in Virginia, where he was married twice, one of his wives being a Miss Kidwell. His sons, James and Presley, came to Missouri in 1831. The former settled in Callaway County, and married Matilda Darnes, by whom he had eight children. Presley settled in Montgomery County, and lives at New Florence. He learned the trade of a gunsmith, and is also a...

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