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Location: Caddo County OK

The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that pursued by their enemies following it back to what they knew would be the defenseless village of women, children, and old men left behind by the warriors. The objects of their cruel vengeance were camped at the mouth of Rainy-Mountain Creek, a southern tributary of the Washita, within the present limits of the reservation at Fort Sill.

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Houses of the Wichita Tribe

Like the other members of this linguistic family, whose villages have already been described, the Wichita had two forms of dwellings, which they occupied under different conditions. One served as the structure in their permanent villages, the other being of a more temporary nature. But, instead of the earth-covered lodges used farther north, their fixed villages were composed of groups of high circular structures, entirely thatched from bottom to top. Their movable camps, when away from home on war or hunting expeditions, consisted of the skin-covered tents of the plains. The peculiar thatched structures were first seen and described...

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Biography of G. O. Hall, M. D.

The career of Dr. G. O. Hall, a leading physician of Bartlesville, is proof of the fact that it is only under adverse conditions that the best and strongest in the individual are developed, for he is a self-educated, self-made man whose indomitable purpose and untiring effort have enabled him to overcome all obstacles and difficulties in his path and work his way steadily forward to the goal of success. A native of Texas, he was born September 1, 1882, and is a son of Dr. P. B. Hall, who for the past twenty-one years has been engaged in the practice of medicine at Marlow, Oklahoma, being one of the well known physicians of that locality. G. O. Hall was regarded as a dull boy in school and owing to his retiring nature was not popular with his playmates, but by those who knew him well he was loved and trusted. His early life was one of hardship and privations and when twelve years of age he was run over by a wagon, the injury causing an infection which necessitated the use of crutches for five years, and he is still lame. The accident nearly cost him his life and he was obliged to remain out of school for three years but studied at home and made three grades during this time. His parents were in straitened circumstances and...

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Courtney, Alva

Alva Courtney, 90, of Sweet Home, died Feb. 14, 2005. A graveside service was held today at the North Powder Cemetery. Workman & Steckley Funeral Chapel of Sweet Home handled the arrangements. Alva was born Dec. 10, 1914, in Anadarko, Okla., to Joseph and Myrtle English Courtney. He married Pauline Coates on Aug. 7, 1937, in Haines. She preceded him in death in 1972. He served in the U.S. Army in World War II. Alva is survived by his daughter and son-in-law, Juanita and Nick Hutchins of Sweet Home; two grandsons, Jeff Hutchins and his wife, Sally, of Lebanon and Trent Hutchins and his wife, Julie, of Fresno, Calif.; two granddaughters, Sheli Hutchins of Richmond, Calif., and Kim Hutchins of Portland; and three great-grandchildren. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, February 18, 2005 Transcribed by: Belva...

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Stevens, Ova Belle Anderson Mrs. – Obituary

Richland, Oregon Ova Belle Stevens, 90, of Richland, died Jan. 11, 2004, at St. Elizabeth Health Services. Her funeral will be at 1 p.m. Thursday at the Richland Christian Church. Pastor Gordon Bond will officiate. Visitations will be from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday at Gray’s West & Co. Pioneer Chapel, 1500 Dewey Ave. There will be a graveside service at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 21, at Mount Hope Cemetery in San Diego. Ova Belle was born to James M. and Eva L. Anderson on Dec. 20, 1913, at Carnegie, Okla. She attended school and was raised in Caddo County, Okla. Ova married Thomas T. Stevens at Fort Cobb, Okla., on March 17, 1930. The couple moved to Phoenix, Ariz., in 1941, then to Imperial Beach, Calif., in 1943. Both Ova and Thomas went to work for Rohr Aircraft. Ova worked as an assembler, building military and commercial aircraft parts. Ova retired from Rohr Aircraft in 1975. Thomas died in 1976, shortly after his retirement. Ova remained in Imperial Beach until 1984 when she moved to Richland to be near her two daughters, Betty Bennett and Retha Allensworth. Ova enjoyed quilting and various other crafts after her retirement. She was preceded in death by her husband, Thomas; two brothers, Doyle and Leon Anderson; two sisters, Dura Bohannon and Mabel Lindsay; and one great-granddaughter, Danielle Andrade. Survivors include her...

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Caddo Geographical Location

The remnants of the Caddo confederacies of northwestern Louisiana and northeastern Texas settled in Oklahoma in 1859. After the Louisiana  Purchase when Louisiana bands joined their tribesmen in Texas all lived there peaceably until some White Texans determined upon an indiscriminate massacre of raiding Comanche and of all Reservation Indians. The Caddo escaped by a forced march of two weeks in midsummer to the banks of the Washita River. Of this period White Moon talked as follows: Comanche and Kiowa would raid, up to the Caddo villages. 1Weko, village The Texans trailed them and blamed the Caddo as well. The soldiers stood by the Caddo, said they would move them north where they would have no further trouble with Texans. Caddo were scouts for the United States army. Once a Kiowa wearing a corselet of hide from buffalo head and using medicine could not be killed. White soldiers shot at him, then a Caddo scout shot him in the back where the corselet raised up as he stooped. After the Caddo killed this fellow, the Kiowa became weak. Before the Territory was opened up and afterwards, there were violent doings among both Whites and Indians. My jitney driver and friend, Jim Blakeley, who was a sheriff in those early days, told me several grim stories, but the story I found most interesting was told by James Ingkanish to illustrate the prophetic...

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