Location: Butler County OH

Shaw, Claude H. – Obituary

In ill health for several years, Claude H. Shaw, died at his home in Noble township, Wednesday evening at 7:10 o’clock. He was 78 years. Mr. Shaw, who was a farmer and had spent the greater past of his life in Shelby county, was born in Butler County, Ohio, on April 18, 1869. He was a member of the Methodist Church. On December 23, 1894, he was married to Miss Mellie Phillippe, who survives with a daughter, Mrs. Sally Weidner; three granddaughters, Mrs. Ralph Bentley, Mrs. David Snyder and Miss Claudine Weidner, all of this city, and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at the Pleasant Grove Baptist church today at 2:00 p.m. (DST) and burial will be made in the church cemetery in charge of Carl Norman of Hope. Friends may call at the late home at any time. Shelbyville Republican, Friday, August 8, 1947 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biography of Enos Fitterer

Enos Fitterer was born in Baden, Germany, July 28, 1835, and lived in his native land until 1846, when his parents emigrated to America. They settled on a farm in Butler county, Ohio, and there the subject of this sketch lived and grew to manhood. In 1856 he went to Hamilton, Ohio, to learn the baker’s trade with Messrs. Nutts & Sivers, remained with them some fifteen months, and then located in Carthage, Hancock county, Illinois, where he established himself in the bakery business and carried it on until 1861. In that year he joined the Union army, enlisting in. Company B, Thirty-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served during the war, participating in the battles of Pittsburgh Landing, Hatchie River, and numerous skirmishes; and was with Sherman in his famous “March through Georgia, from Atlanta to the sea.” He was mustered out of the service at Leavenworth, Kansas, in September, 1865, and received his honorable discharge at Springfield, Illinois. From Springfield he went to Trenton, Missouri, the following November, and there, in connection with C. A. Hoffman, opened a bakery and grocery establishment, under the firm name of Hoffman & Fitterer. This firm continued business until 1867, when Mr. Hoffman retired, and Mr. Fitterer continued to carry on the business until 1873, when his brother became associated with him, under the name and style of Fitterer & Bro., and...

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Biography of Rev. John A. Anderson

Rev. John A. Anderson, so long identified with the work of the Presbyterian Church at Junction City, and, while a resident of that place, with the affairs of Congress, of which he was a member, had a remarkable experience for a elergyman. He graduated from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in 1853, Benjamin Harrison being his roommate for a time. Mr. Anderson began his ministerial work at Stockton, California, in 1857, and is said to have preached the first union sermon on the Pacific coast. In 1860 the state legislature of California elected him trustee of the state insane asylum. Two years later he was appointed chaplain of the Third California Infantry, and in that capacity he accompanied General Connor’s expedition to Salt Lake City. As correspondent and agent of the United States Sanitary Commission for California his first duty was to act as relief agent of the Twelfth army corps. He was next transferred to the central office at New York. In 1864, when General Grant began moving toward Richmond, Mr. Anderson was made superintendent of transportation and had charge of six steamboats. At the close of the campaign he served as assistant superintendent of the canvas and supply department at Philadelphia and edited a paper ealled the Sanitary Commission Bulletin. When the war closed he was transterred to the history burean of the commission at Washington, remaining there...

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Biographical Sketch of John T. Burris, Col.

Col. John T. Burris, who was born in Butler County, Ohio, in December, 1828, spent his boyhood and youth in Kentucky. He went to Iowa in 1847, served in the Mexican war from that state, cultivated a farm for several years which he obtained on a soldier’s land warrant, and in 1852 sold his land and opened a hotel at Fredonia on the Iowa River. Soon afterward he commenced the study of law, was admitted to the bar in 1853, two years later was elected judge of the County Court and in 1858 settled at Olathe, Kansas. Colonel Burris was elected a member of the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention in 1859. In the spring of 1861 he served as sergeant in Lane’s Frontier Guards, and soon afterward Lincoln appointed him district attorney of the new state. He enlisted in August, 1861, and became lieutemant colonal of the Fourth Kansas Infantry, continuing with it and its successor, the Tenth, until the close of the Civil war. At its close he returned to Olathe and resumed practice. In 1865 he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives, of which he served as speaker; was chosen attorney of Johnson County in 1866, and three years later was appointed judge of the Tenth District; also in 1869 was again elected to the lower house of the Legislature. Colonel Burris was one of the...

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Slave Narrative of Peter Bruner

Interviewer: Evelyn McLemore Person Interviewed: Peter Bruner Date of Interview: 1936 Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co. Date of Birth: 1845 ESTILL CO. (Evelyn McLemore) Story of Peter Bruner, a former slave: Peter Bruner, was born in Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co., in 1845. His master was John Bell Bruner, who at that time treated him fairly well. When Peter was 10 years of age his master brought him and his sister to Irvine. After arriving in Irvine, Peter’s master was very cruel to him. They got only cornbread, fat meat and water to eat. If his master’s hunger was not satisfied, he would even take this little from them. The[TR:?] were tables to eat from. Once Peter, was taken into his master’s house to nurse the children and was made to sleep on the floor with only a ragged quilt to lie on and one thin one over him. Often he was whipped because his mistress said the washing was not clean, when it was. On one occasion when he was beaten his master took a piece of sole leather about 1 foot long and 2 inches wide, cut it full of holes and dipped it in water that was brined. He then took the leather and lashed the poor slave’s back. Joe Bruner, was a better master to his slaves than John. Once when Peter...

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Slave Narrative of Reverend Williams

Interviewer: Miriam Logan Person Interviewed: Rev. Williams Location: Lebanon, Ohio Place of Birth: Greenbriar County, West Virginia Date of Birth: 1859 Age: 76 Occupation: Methodist minister Miriam Logan Lebanon, Ohio July 8th Warren County, District 2 Story of REVEREND WILLIAMS, Aged 76, Colored Methodist Minister, Born Greenbriar County, West Virginia (Born 1859) “I was born on the estate of Miss Frances Cree, my mother’s mistress. She had set my grandmother Delilah free with her sixteen children, so my mother was free when I was born, but my father was not. “My father was butler to General Davis, nephew of Jefferson Davis. General Davis was wounded in the Civil War and came home to die. My father, Allen Williams was not free until the Emancipation.” “Grandmother Delilah belonged to Dr. Cree. Upon his death and the division of his estate, his maiden daughter came into possession of my grandmother, you understand. Miss Frances nor her brother Mr. Cam. ever married. Miss Frances was very religious, a Methodist, and she believed Grandmother Delilah should be free, and that we colored children should have schooling.” “Yes ma’m, we colored people had a church down there in West Virginia, and grandmother Delilah had a family Bible of her own. She had fourteen boys and two girls. My mother had sixteen children, two boys, fourteen girls. Of them-mother’s children, you understand, there were seven...

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Biography of Joseph Clinton Wampler Pittman

Joseph Clinton Wampler Pittman. The passage of sixty years or more has removed from Champaign County the greater number of its earliest pioneers, although through worthy descendants their names are preserved and their memories perpetuated. It was sixty-one years ago, in 1856 that Joseph C. W. Pittman was brought into this section of Illinois, being then a child of seven years. In his home community of Mahomet Mr. Pittman is known as a man of most substantial resources and of that influence that springs from strong character and worthy motives. His early life was one of toil and the meeting of adverse conditions presented by a comparatively new country and his success is due to that good fortune which is a result of industry and honorable activities. Mr. Pittman was born in Butler County, Ohio, February 24, 1849, the eighth in a family of nine children, five sons and four daughters, whose parents were George H. and Eliza (Bake) Pittman. Only three of these children are still living, Mary, Joseph C. and Jacob D. Mary, who was well educated and taught school in Mahomet Township three years, is now living at Rockwell City, Iowa, widow of J. L. Stearns. Jacob D., a retired agriculturist at Mahomet, married Miss Mary Abbott. George H. Pittman was born in New Jersey, but was taken when a child by his parents to Ohio,...

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Biography of Austin McCreary Keene

Austin McCreary Keene. The subject of this sketch is one of theĀ prominentĀ and successful attorneys of Southeastern Kansas. He was born at Middletown, Ohio, September 4, 1865, the son of Marshall B. Keene and Jennette McCreary Keene. Marshall Keene was born in 1823 at Keensburg, Illinois, a village in Wabash County named for his forbears. The Keenes of Keensburg have been men of prominence in that locality, having served as members of the Illinois Asscmbly, and been notable physieians and manufacturers. Jennette MeCreary was born in Monroe, Ohio, in 1836, and was married to Marshall B. Keene in 1861. Mr. Keene was at that time a manufacturer of carriages in Monroe. He had at different times maintained factories in Cincinnati, in Hartford, Connecticut, and later in Monroe. Three children were born to them: Mary, now residing in Fort Scott; George W., living at Carthage, Missouri, a shoe manufacturer; and Austin M. In 1890 Mr. and Mrs. Keene removed to Kansas, settling in Fort Scott where their son Austin had been a practicing attorney since 1887. Here they are passing the evening of their days watched over by their children and grandchildren. A. M. Keene spent his boyhood days in and about Middletown, his birthplace. His education was begun there. Later he attended a country school for some years, but graduated from the Middletown High School. He then entered the University...

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Biography of William M. Brown, M. D.

The medical fraternity is ably represented by Dr. William M. Brown, who is the leading physician of Cuprum, whither he removed in June of the present year, 1899, from Salubria, where he had continuously and successfully engaged in practice from June 1892. He was born in Preble County, Ohio, on the 18th of November, 1860. His ancestors were early settlers of South Carolina, and his grandfather, James Brown, was born in Due West, that state. James Scott Brown, the Doctor’s father, was a native of Preble County, Ohio, and having arrived at man’s estate he married Miss Julia Robertson, of Brighton, Iowa, who was born at Spring Hill, Indiana. He spent his entire life, however, near the old homestead where his birth occurred, and was an industrious, prosperous and honorable farmer. He and his wife were valued members of the United Presbyterian Church and exemplified in their daily lives their religious belief. Dr. Brown, the eldest in their family of nine children, eight of whom are yet living, was liberally educated and thus fitted for the responsible duties of life. Having attended the public schools of the Buckeye state, he further continued his studies in the university at Oxford, Ohio, and in Mommouth College, at Monmouth, Illinois. He was graduated in the Miami Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio, in the class of 1888, having therein completed a course in...

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Biography of Bertha Louise Ahrens

Bertha Louise Ahrens (B. Feb. 26, 1857), missionary teacher among the Choctaw Freedmen of Indian Territory since 1885, and principal teacher at Oak Hill Academy, 1905-1911, is a native of Berlin, Prussia. Her parents, Otto and Augusta Ahrens, in 1865, when she was 8, and a brother Otto 5, came to America and located on a farm near Sigourney, Iowa, after one year at Bellville, Illinois; and four, at Harper, Iowa. The schools and Churches first attended used the German language. Her first studies in English were in the graded schools at Sigourney and here at seventeen, she became a member of the Presbyterian Church under the pastorate of Rev. S. G. Hair. He loaned her some missionary literature to read and it awakened a desire on her part to become a missionary. This desire was expressed to the Women’s Missionary society of the Church and she was encouraged to attend the Western Female Seminary, now college, at Oxford, Ohio. After a course of study at this institution she enjoyed a year’s training in the Bible school connected with Moody’s Chicago Avenue Church, Chicago. During the next year, after hearing in her home town an appeal in behalf of a Negro school in the south, she was led to offer her services to the Presbyterian Board of Missions for Freedmen. In December 1885, she received a commission with request...

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Biography of Harlan P. Ustick, A. M., M. D.

The medical profession in Boise is ably represented by Dr. Harlan Page Ustick, a prominent homeopathic physician, who was born in Fayette county, Ohio, on the 26th of November, 1848. His paternal grandfather was a Baptist minister, who, leaving his home in France, crossed the Atlantic to New York City, where he passed the residue of his days. His son, William Arnold Ustick, the father of the Doctor, was born in Orange County. New York, in the year 1800, and when seventeen years of age removed to Ohio, where he resided until he laid down the burdens of life, in his ninetieth year. He married Miss Mary Stewart, a native of Maryland, and a descendant of the royal house of Stuart, of England. Mr. Ustick resided upon a farm and was accounted one of the industrious and practical agriculturists of his community. In later years he also engaged in buying and selling wool on an extensive scale, and won success in his undertakings. For many years he was an elder in the Presbyterian Church, and his life was actuated by noble principles and characterized by kindly deeds. Uncompromisingly opposed to oppression of every form, his home became a station on the famous Underground Railroad in antebellum days, and he aided many a poor Negro on his way to freedom. He died in his ninetieth year, and his wife passed...

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Biography of Chester Stevens

Chester Stevens, representing a pioneer family in Montgomery County, had been an active factor in local affairs and in the legal profession for the past ten years. He is now serving as county auditor, and also enjoys some influential and profitable connections as a lawyer with offices in Independence. Some of his ancestors fought in the American Revolution, and the Stevens family came from England and settled in New York in colonial times. His grandfather, Chauncey Stevens, was born in New York, and went as a pioneer to the State of Indiana, where he followed farming until his death. Chester Stevens was born in Montgomery County, Kansas, September 15, 1882. His father, R. E. Stevens, came to Montgomery County, Kansas, in 1870. At that time the Town of Independence had hardly been started, and he was closely associated with much of the early life of this then frontier county. For about twelve years he engaged in the freighting business, before railroads were built, from Montgomery County to Fort Scott and Sedan. He spent his last years on a farm near Elk City, and his farm of eighty acres is still owned by his widow. He was born in the State of Indiana not far from Hamilton, Ohio, grew up in Indiana, but was married across the line in Ohio. He died at Elk City, Kansas, April 10, 1885. He...

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Biographical Sketch of George S. Bishop

The George S. Bishop, second member of the firm of Case, Bishop & Heron, was born in Butler County, Ohio. He was a soldier in the United States Army; enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Sixty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry. In 1871 he came to Jewell County, Kan., and was elected County Surveyor of Jewell County; was elected to the Kansas State Legislature for three...

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Biographical Sketch of William L. Blair

Blair, William L.; railroad business; born, Hamilton, O., Dec. 27, 1858; son of William Henry and Angeline Linn Blair; educated, High School, Hamilton, O.; married, Hamilton, O., November, 1908, Ella Brant Elliott; member Troop A, O. N. G., 1886 to 1897; entered the employ Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton R. R., as telegraph operator, in December, 1872; telegraph operator, train dispatcher and clerk until September, 1880; with N. Y., C. & St. L. R. R. Co. September, 1881, to September, 1893; chief clerk and gen. mgr. September, 1893, to March, 1901; supt. Eastern Division, March, 1901, to October, 1905; supt. Telegraph, October, 1905, to October, 1906; supt. Eastern Division, October, 1906, to June, 1912; supt. transportation, June, 1912, to date; asst. to gen. mgr.; member Athletic...

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Biographical Sketch of John Moreland Henderson

Henderson, John Moreland; lawyer; born, Newville, O., April 14, 1840; son of James T. and Ann Moreland Henderson; graduate Miami University, 1862; married, College Hill, O., June 20, 1872; seven children; member law firm of Henderson, Quail &...

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