Location: Burke County NC

John Alexander – Descendants

The Genealogy of the Alexander family, into which Robert Love, commonly known as “Carter Bob”(my Father-F.D. Love) married, having married Sarah Matilda Alexander, May 25th, 1848, Alexanders —- John Alexander, was born in Rowan County, North Carolina, where he married Rachel Davidson (a first cousin of General William Davidson, who in the War of the Revolution was killed at Cowan’s Ford of the Catawba River in resisting the passage of Cornwallis), daughter of John Davidson. John Alexander removed from Rowan County to Lincoln County, North Carolina; thence to Buncombe County, (the Burke County) North Carolina (one of its first settlers); thence to Tennessee, settled on the Harpeth River where he and his wife died. His son, James Alexander, was born in Rowan County, North Carolina, on Buffalo Creek, December 23rd, 1756. He removed thence to Crowder’s Creek, Lincoln County, North Carolina, near King’s Mountain, and participated in the great battle fought at that place last mentioned on the American side. On March 19th, 1782, he married Rhoda Cunningham, who was born in Pennsylvania, October 13th, 1763 and moved thence to Maryland and thence to York District, South Carolina. James Alexander (Presbyterian) and wife removed to Buncombe County (then Burke), North Carolina, and settled at the Alexander Place on Bee Tree Creek near where it empties into the Swannanoa River, ten miles East of Asheville. Here he died in 1844....

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Biography of Colonel Charles McDowell

Colonel Charles McDowell and his brothers, Joseph and William, were sons of Joseph McDowell and Margaret O’Neal, who emigrated from Ireland and settled in Winchester, Va. Here, Charles and Joseph were born, the former in 1743. Soon afterward, Joseph McDowell, Sr., moved to Burke county, N.C. In June, 1780, Colonel Charles McDowell being joined by Colonels Isaac Shelby and John Sevier from Tennessee, and by Colonel Clarke, of Georgia, near the Cherokee Ford on Broad river, in South Carolina, he determined to attack a post held by the enemy on Pacolet river, in Spartanburg county. The position was strongly fortified under the command of Captain Patrick Moore, a distinguished loyalist. On being surrounded, the enemy, after some parley as to terms, surrendered as prisoners of war. One British Sergeant Major, ninety-three loyalists, two hundred and fifty fire-arms and other munitions of war were the fruits of this victory. Soon afterward Col. McDowell detached Shelby to watch the movements of Ferguson, and attack him. On the 1st of August, 1780, Shelby met the advance guard of Ferguson at Cedar Spring, about six hundred strong, when a spirited contest commenced; but on the enemy being reinforced, Shelby made good his retreat, carrying off from the field twenty prisoners, including two British officers. On learning that a body of five hundred Tories had assembled on the south side of Enoree river, near...

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Biography of General Daniel Morgan

General Daniel Morgan was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1737, and moved to Virginia in 1755. He was a private soldier under General Braddock, and after the defeat of that officer returned to his occupation of a farmer and a wagoner. When the war of the Revolution broke out, he joined the army under General Washington, at Cambridge, and commanded a corps of riflemen. He was with General Montgomery at Quebec, and with General Gates at Saratoga, in both of which battles he greatly distinguished himself. For his bravery he was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General, and joined the army in the South. After the battle of Camden, when General Greene assumed the chief command, General Morgan was detached to raise troops in the western part of the State and in South Carolina. He soon became distinguished as a partisan officer, inspiring confidence and arousing the despondent Whigs to a more active sense of duty. His victory at the Cowpens was justly considered as one of the most brilliant and decided victories of the Revolution, and Congress accordingly voted him a gold medal. At the close of the war, he returned to his farm. In 1794 he was appointed by General Washington to quell the Whisky Insurrection in Western Virginia, and after the difficulties were settled, he was elected a member of Congress and served from...

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Biography of General William Lenoir

General William Lenoir was born in Brunswick county, Virginia, on the 20th of May, 1751. He was of French (Huguenot) descent, and the youngest of a family of ten children. When he was about eight years old his father removed to a place near Tarboro, N.C., where he resided until his death, a short time afterward. He received no other education than his own limited means and personal exertions enabled him to procure. When about twenty years of age he married Ann Ballard, of Halifax, N.C.–a lady possessing, in an eminent degree, those domestic and heroic virtues which qualified her for sustaining the privations and hardships of a frontier life, which it was her lot afterward to encounter. In March 1775 Gen. Lenoir removed with his family to Wilkes county (then a part of Surry) and settled near the place where Wilkesboro now stands. Previous to leaving Halifax he signed the paper known as the “Association,” containing a declaration of patriotic principles and means of redress, relative to the existing troubles with Great Britain. Soon after his removal to Surry he was appointed a member of the “Committee of Safety” for that county. He took an early and active part in repelling the depredating and murderous incursions of the Cherokee Indians upon the frontier settlements. In this kind of service he was actively engaged until the celebrated expedition, under...

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Biography of Colonel Benjamin Cleveland

Colonel Benjamin Cleaveland, one of the distinguished heroes of King’s Mountain, and in honor of whom Cleaveland county is named, lived and died in Wilkes county at a good old age. In 1775 he first entered the service as Ensign in the second regiment of troops, and acted a brave and conspicuous part in the battle’s of King’s Mountain and Guilford court house. A serious impediment in his speech prevented him from entering public life. He is frequently spoken of in the mountain country as the “hero of a hundred fights with the Tories.” He was for many years the Surveyor of Wilkes county and resided at the “Little Hickerson place.” Among other singular incidents in his remarkable career, as preserved by General William Lenoir, and recorded in Wheeler’s “Historical Sketches,” we give place to the following: “Riddle Knob, in Watauga county, derives its name from a circumstance of the capture of Colonel Benjamin Cleaveland, during the Revolution, by a party of Tories headed by men of this name, and adds the charm of heroic association to the loveliness of it unrivaled scenery. Cleaveland had been a terror to the Tories. Two notorious characters of their band, (Jones and Coil) had been apprehended by him and hung. Cleaveland had gone alone, on some private business, to New river, and was taken prisoners by the Tories, at the ‘Old Fields,...

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Biography of Colonel John Sevier

Colonel John Sevier was born in Shenandoah county, Virginia, in 1734. His father descended from an ancient family in France, the name being originally spelled Xavier. About 1769 young Sevier joined an exploring and emigrating party to the Holston river, in East Tennessee, then a part of North Carolina. He assisted in erecting the first fort on the Watauga river, where he, his father, his brother Valentine, and others settled. Whilst engaged in the defence of the Watauga fort, in conjunction with Captain James Robertson, so known and distinguished in the early history of Middle Tennessee, he espied a young lady, of tall and erect stature, running rapidly towards the fort, closely pursued by Indians, and her approach to the gate cut off by the savage enemy. Her cruel pursuers were doubtless confident of securing a captive or a victim to their blood-thirty purposes; but, turning suddenly, she eluded the savages, leaped the palisades of the fort at another point, and gracefully fell into the arms of Captain John Sevier. This remarkably active and resolute woman was Miss Catharine Sherrill, who, in a few years after this sudden leap and rescue, became the devoted and heroic wife of the gallant Captain and future Colonel, General, Governor and people’s friend, John Sevier. She became the mother of ten children, who could gratefully rise up and call her blessed. During Sevier’s...

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Alexander L. Shuping

Wagoner, C. A. C., Btry. C, 61st Regt.; of Burke County; son of J. A. and Mamie Lane Shuping. Entered service April 19, 1917, at Morganton, N.C. Sent to Ft. Scriven, Ga. Sailed for France July 31, 1918. Promoted to Wagoner July, 1918. Returned to USA Feb. 17, 1919, at Hoboken, N. J. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., March 11,...

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Claude M. Sides

R. O. 1st Class (Navy); of Burke County; son of J. M. and Mrs. Ida Sides. Husband of Mrs. Mattie Sylva Sides. Entered service July 7, 1915, at Richmond, Va. Sent to St. Helena, Va. Transferred to U. S. S. Wyoming, then to U. S. S. Jason. Sailed for Brest, France, July, 1917. Promoted to rank of Ordinary Seaman November, 1915; to seaman, 1916; to rank of Radio Electrician 1st Class. Made eight trips across to England, France, Spain, Italy and Austria and to Brezil. Mustered out at Boston, Mass., July 5,...

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R. H. Powell

Private, 1st Regt., F. A. Born in Burke County, 1890; son of S. J. and Mrs. Mittie Powell; husband of Mrs. Cordia Powell. Entered service August, 1918, at Valdese, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., Dec. 14,...

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Charles Wiseman

Private, Heavy Artly., Btry. C, 1st Regt., F. A. R. D. Born in Burke County, N.C., April 22, 1897; son of C. W. and Mrs. M. L. Wiseman. Entered the service at Carthage, N.C., Aug. 22, 1918, and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. Mustered out of the service at Camp Jackson, S. C., June 28,...

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William R. Lowman

Private, 321st Inf., Co. B, 81st Div. Born in Burke County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Lowman. Husband of Mrs. Ivey Lowman. Entered the service May 25, 1918, at Morganton, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and from there to Camp Sevier, S. C. Was sent to Base Hospital at Camp Sevier, S. C. Mustered out at Camp Sevier, S. C., Dec. 7,...

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Albert F. Garrou

Sergt., Air Service, Co. 16th 4th Regt.; of Burke County; son of John and Marie Garrou. Husband of Louise Garrou. Entered service Dec. 10, 1917, at Valdese, N.C. Sent to Fort Thomas, Ky. Transferred to Camp Hancock, from there to Camp Greene, N.C., then to Camp Upton. Sailed for France July 15, 1918. Promoted to rank as Sergt. July, 1918. Returned to USA June 9, 1919. Mustered out at Mitchell Field, July 2,...

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Ferdinand Parise

Private, 1st Class, A. E. F., Hdqrs. Co., A. E. F. in Siberia, Russia; from Burke County; son of F. and Mrs. K. Parise. Husband of Mrs. Deled Parise. Entered the service at Valdese, N.C., 1914, and sent to Texas City, Texas. Transferred to Philippine Islands, from there to Japan, and then to Russia. Served on the Mexican border and was in Douglas, Ariz., when three men of his company were killed by Mexicans. Sailed for Russia, Feb. 5, 1916, and returned to the USA Feb. 16, 1919. Mustered out of service March, 25, 1919, at General Hospital, San Francisco, Cal. Disabled in line of...

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Harold W. Davis

Corpl., Med. I. M. S. No. 2 Co.; son of Mr. B. F. and Mrs. M. L. Davis; of Burke County. Entered service July 21, 1917, at Morganton, N.C. Sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky. Transferred to Ft. Ben Harrison, Ind., then to Ft. Jay, N. Y. Sailed for France Sept. 20, 1917. Was six months in Army of Occupation in Germany. Returned to USA Aug. 8, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Mills, N. Y., Aug. 15,...

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Frank Cline

Private, F. A. Son of W. P. and H. R. Cline, of Burke County. Husband of Mrs. Ester Cline. Entered service Aug. 26, 1918, at Valdese. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Newport News to go across. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, Dec. 15,...

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