Location: Bullock County AL

Slave Narrative of Samuel Simeon Andrews

Interviewer: Rachel A. Austin Person Interviewed: Samuel Simeon Andrews Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 86 For almost 30 years Edward Waters College, an African Methodist Episcopal School, located on the north side of Kings Road in the western section of Jacksonville, has employed as watchman, Samuel Simeon Andrews (affectionately called “Parson”), a former slave of A.J. Lane of Georgia, Lewis Ripley of Beaufort, South Carolina, Ed Tillman of Dallas, Texas, and John Troy of Union Springs, Alabama. “Parson” was born November 18, 1850 in Macon, Georgia, at a place called Tatum Square, where slaves were held, housed and sold. “Speculators” (persons who traveled from place to place with slaves for sale) had housed 84 slaves there – many of whom were pregnant women. Besides “Parson,” two other slave-children, Ed Jones who now lives in Sparta, Georgia, and George Bailey were born in Tatum Square that night. The morning after their births, a woman was sent from the nearby A.J. Lane plantation to take care of the three mothers; this nurse proved to be “Parson’s” grandmother. His mother told him afterwards that the meeting of mother and daughter was very jubilant, but silent and pathetic, because neither could with safety show her pleasure in finding the other. At the auction which was held a few days later, his mother, Rachel, and her two sons, Solomon Augustus and her infant who was...

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Biography of George Henry Walker

George Henry Walker occupies a prominent position in business, circles of Muskogee as vice president and general manager of the Osage Cotton Oil Company and has also served as mayor of the city since April, 1920. His birth occurred at Union Springs, Alabama, on the 1st of October, 1872, his parents being Merriott W. and Rexie (Goodwin) Walker, the former a prosperous planter and merchant. After mastering the elementary branches of learning George Henry Walker pursued a high school course in his native town and subsequently attended a business college at Poughkeepsie, New York. When his textbooks were put aside he secured a position as bookkeeper in an oil mill at a salary of sixty dollars per month and he has since been identified with cotton seed oil mill interests. It was in September, 1910, that George Henry Walker came to Muskogee, where he has remained throughout the intervening period of eleven years and has become well known in the oil mill business, being now vice president and general manager of the Osage Cotton Oil Company, which is capitalized for two million dollars and has its home office in Muskogee. The company conducts fourteen mills in Oklahoma, two in Arkansas, one in Louisiana and three in Florida and also operates one hundred cotton gins, the enterprise being one of extensive proportions and increasing importance. Mr. Walker possesses untiring energy,...

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Muskogee Indians

Muskogee. Meaning unknown, but perhaps originally from Shawnee and having reference to swampy ground. To this tribe the name Creeks was ordinarily applied. Also called: Ani’-Gu’sa, by the Cherokee, meaning “Coosa people,” after an ancient and famous town on Coosa River. Ku-û’sha, by the Wyandot. Ochesee, by the Hitchiti. Sko’-ki han-ya, by the Biloxi. Muskogee Connections. The Muskogee language constitutes one division of the Muskhogean tongues proper, that which I call Northern. Muskogee Location. From the earliest times of which we have any record these people seem to have had towns all the way from the Atlantic coast of Georgia and the neighborhood of Savannah River to central Alabama. (See also Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas.) Muskogee Villages It is difficult to separate major divisions of the Muskogee from towns and towns from villages, but there were certainly several distinct Muskogee tribes at a very early period. The following subdivisional classification is perhaps as good as any: Abihka (in St. Clair, Calhoun, and Talladega Counties): Abihka-in-the-west, a late branch of Abihka in the western part of the Creek Nation, Okla. Abihkutci, on Tallassee Hatchee Creek, Talladega County, on the right bank 5 miles from Coosa River. Kan-tcati, on or near Chocolocko, or Choccolocco, Creek and probably not far from the present “Conchardee.” Kayomalgi, possibly settled by Shawnee or Chickasaw, probably near Sylacauga, Talladega County. Lun-ham-ga, location unknown. Talladega,...

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Bullock County, Alabama Census Records

Bullock County was formed in 1867 from Barbour, Macon, Montgomery and Pike. Barbour County, Alabama Census Records Macon County, Alabama Census Records Montgomery County, Alabama Census Records Pike County, Alabama Census Records 1870 Bullock County, Alabama Census Free 1870 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1870 Bullock County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1870 U.S. Census Guide 1880 Bullock County, Alabama Census Free 1880 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1880 Bullock County, Census (images and index) 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1880 U.S. Census Guide 1890 Bullock County, Alabama Census Free 1890 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1890 Veterans Schedule $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1890 U.S. Census Guide 1900 Bullock County, Alabama Census Free 1900 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1900 Bullock County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1900 U.S. Census Guide 1910 Bullock County, Alabama Census Free 1910 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1910 Bullock County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1910 U.S. Census Guide 1920 Bullock County, Alabama Census Free 1920 Census Form for your Research...

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Bullock County, Alabama Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemetery hosted at Ancestry: Old Confederate Cemetery, Union Springs Following Cemetery transcriptions and photos hosted at Bullock County, USGenWeb Archives Project: Bethel Presbyterian Church Cemetery County Line Zion A.M.E. Church Cemetery (African American) Edwards Cemetery Fellowship Cemetery John Strom Homeplace Cemetery Meredith Cemetery Sardis Baptist Church Cemetery Still Cemetery Union Cemetery The following cemeteries have transcriptions hosted at Bullock County, ALGenWeb: Fellowship Cemetery, Midway Oak Hill Cemetery, Union Springs Following Cemetery transcription hosted at Bullock County, Rivah Research: New Deloach Cemetery Following Cemetery hosted at Genealogy Trails: Old City Cemetery (aka Old Confederate Cemetery) Following Cemetery transcriptions hosted at Political Graveyard: Oak Hill Cemetery, Union Springs Following Cemeteries hosted at Bullock County, Tracking Your Roots: Indian Creek Cemetery, Smut Eye Mount Hillard Baptist Church Cemetery Salem Cemetery Following Historical Cemeteries hosted at Interment: Sardis Cemetery, Sardis Still Cemetery, Still Crossroad Find A Grave hosts gravestone photos and/or cemetery transcriptions for the following cemeteries in Bullock County: Aberfoil Cemetery Antioch Church Cemetery Barnette Cemetery Bethel Cemetery Cope Cemetery Cornerstone Cemetery Creek Stand Cemetery, Union Springs Crews Cemetery, Fittzpatrick Dasinger Cemetery Edwards Cemetery Edwards Cemetery, Union Springs Elizabeth Cemetery Enton Cemetery Fairview Cemetery Fellowship Cemetery, Midway Fitzpatrick Cemetery Glenford Cemetery Haines Chapel...

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