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Location: Bryan County OK

Biographical Sketch of Judge Loring Folsom

Judge Loring Folsom, now the only surviving child of Colonel David Folsom and his first wife, Rhoda Nail, was long one of the leading men of the Choctaw Nation, but retired from the political arena several years ago, and has ever since been living in peace and quiet on his farm one and a half miles south of the town of Caddo, which took its name from a tribe of Indians whom the Choctaws defeated in battle on a group of high hills at the base of which Judge Loring Folsom now lives. This was the last battle in which the Choctaws were ever engaged as a Nation. In this the sun of their military glory went down to be followed by no returning morn. But no study is needed to ascertain that Judge Loring Folsom is also a genuine man; a man from all dissimulation free a characteristic so notable of the Choctaws and ever wearing a cheerful face, so indicative of the warm feelings of a kind and generous friend. His natural disposition is remarkably amiable, being endowed with a gentleness of manner and delicacy of feeling, which to the casual observer would not at first indicate that inflexible firmness which he always manifests in determining questions of duty. He filled the high and responsible position of Circuit Judge in his district for nearly twenty years, with...

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The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man to witness, except that of Sam Dale, the great scout of General Andrew...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Grayson

Person Interviewed: Mary Grayson Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 83 I am what we colored people call a “native.” That means that I didn’t come into the Indian country from somewhere in the Old South, after the war, like so many Negroes did, but I was born here in the old Creek Nation, and my master was a Creek Indian. That was eighty three years ago, so I am told. My mammy belonged to white people back in Alabama when she was born, down in the southern part I think, for she told me that after she was a sizeable girl her white people moved into the eastern part of Alabama where there was a lot of Creeks. Some of them Creeks was mixed up with the whites, and some of the big men in the Creeks who come to talk to her master was almost white, it looked like. “My white folks moved around a lot when I was a little girl”, she told me. When mammy was about 10 or 12 years old some of the Creeks begun to come out to the Territory in little bunches. They wasn’t the ones who was taken out here by the soldiers and contractor men, they come on ahead by themselves and most of them had plenty of money, too. A Creek come to my mammy’s master and bought her to...

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Slave Narrative of Polly Colbert

Person Interviewed: Polly Colbert Location: Colbert, Oklahoma Age: 83 I am now living on de forty-acre farm dat de Government give me and it is just about three miles from my old home on Master Holmes Colbert’s plantation where I lived when I was a slave. Lawsy me, times sure has changed since slavery times Maybe I notice it more since I been living here all de time, but dere’s farms ’round here dat I’ve seen grown timber cleared off of twice during my lifetime. Dis land was first cleared up and worked by niggers when dey was slaves. After de War nobody worked it and it just naturally growed up again wid all sorts of tress. Later, white folks cleared it up again and took grown trees off’n it and now dey are still cultivating it but it is most were cut now. Some of it won’t even sprout peas. Dis same land used to grow corn without hardly any work but it sure won’t do it now. I reckon it was on account of do rich land dat us niggers dat was owned by Indians didn’t have to work so hard as dey did in de old states, but I think dat Indian masters was just naturally kinder any way, leastways mine was. My mother, Idea, was owned by de Colbert family and my father, Tony, was...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Lindsay

Person Interviewed: Mary Lindsay Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Date of Birth: September 20, 1845 Age: 91 My slavery, days wasn’t like most people tell you about. ’cause I was two to my young Mistress and cont away to have when I was jest a little girl. and I didn’t live on a big plantation a very long time. I got an old family Bible what ray I war born on September 20, in 1845 but I don’t know who yut he writing in it unclear it was my mammy’s witness. My mammy had de book when she die. My mammy come out to the Indian country from Eiariy two years before I was born. She was try slave of a Chicasaw part-breed name Sobe Love. He was the kinsfolks of Mr. Eenjamin Love, and Mr. Henry Love what bring the big bunches of the Chickasaws out from Mississipi to the Choctaw country when the Chickasaws sign my do trouty to leave Mississippi, and the whole Love family settle ’round on the Red River below Fort Washita. There that I was born. My mammy any dey have a terrible have time again the sickness when they first come out into that country, because it was low and swampy and all full of came brakes, and everybody have the smallpox and the malaria and fever all the time Lots of the Chickness...

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Slave Narrative of Annie Hawkins

Person Interviewed: Annie Hawkins Location: Colbert, Oklahoma Age: 90 I calls myself 90, but I don’t know jest how old I really am but I was a good sized gal when we moved from Georgia to Texas. We come on a big boat and one night the stars fell. Talk about being scared! We all run and hid and hollered and prayed. We thought the end of the world had come. I never had no whitefolks that was good to me. We all worked jest like dogs and had about half enough to eat and got whupped for everything. Our days was a constant misery to us. I know lots of niggers that was slaves had a good time but we never did. Seems hard that I can’t say anything good for any of ’em but I sho’ can’t. When I was small my job was to tote cool water to the field to the hands. It kept me busy going back and forth and I had to be sho’ my old Mistress had a cool drink when she wanted it, too. Mother and my sister and me worked in the field all day and come in time to clear away the things and cook supper. When we was through in the kitchen we would spin fer a long time. Mother would spin and we would card. My old...

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Slave Narrative of Easter Wells

Person Interviewed: Easter Wells Location: Colbert, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Arkansas Date of Birth: 1854 Age: 83 I was born in Arkansas, in 1854, but we moved to Texas in 1855. I’ve heard ’em tell about de trip to Texas. De grown folks rode in wagons and carts but de chaps all walked dat was big enuff. De men walked and toted their guns and hunted all de way. Dey had plenty of fresh game to eat. My mother’s name was Nellie Bell. I had one sister, Liza. I never saw my father; in fact, I never heard my mammy say anything about him and I don’t guess I ever asked her anything about him for I never thought anything about not having a father. I guess he belonged to another family and when we moved away he was left behind and he didn’t try to find us after de war. My mammy and my sister and me belonged to young Master Jason Bell. We was his onliest slaves and as he using married and lived at home wid his parents we was worked and bossed by his father. Cap’n William Bell and his wife, Mise Mary. After we moved to Texas, old Master built a big double log house, weathe, boarded on de inside and out. It was painted white. Dey was a long gallery clean across de...

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Slave Narrative of Lou Smith

Person Interviewed: Lou Smith Location: Platter, Oklahoma Age: 83 Occupation: Nursing Young Sho’, I remembers de slavery days! I was a little gal but I can tell you lots of things about dem days. My job was nussing de younguns. I took keer of them from daylight to dark. I’d have to sing them to sleep too. I’d sing: By-lo Baby Bunting Daddy’s gone a-hunting To get a rabbit skin To wrap Baby Bunting in.” Sometimes I’d sing: Rock-a-bye baby, in a tree top When de wind blows your cradle’ll rock. When de bough breaks de crad’ll fall Down comes baby cradle’n all.” My father was Jackson Longacre and he was born in Mississippi. My mother, Caroline, was born in South Carolina. Both of them was born slaves. My father belonged to Huriah Longacre. He had a big plantation and lots of niggers. He put up a lot of his slaves as security on a debt and he took sick and died so they put them all on de block and sold them. My father and his mother (my grandma) was sold together. My old Mistress bought my grandmother and old Mistress’ sister bought my grandma’s sister. These white women agreed that they would never go off so far that the two slave women couldn’t see each other. They allus kept this promise. A Mr. Covington offered old Master...

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Biography of Q. B. Boydstun

Q. B. Boydstun, attorney-at-law, practicing as a member of the firm of Mountecastle & Boydstun at Fort Gibson, Muskogee County, is a native son of Oklahoma, his birth having occurred at Caddo, Bryan County, December 8, 198. His parents were R. B. and A. R. (Massengill) Boydstun, the former a native of Tennessee, while the latter was born in Texas. The father is a rancher and stock-man, who came to the Indian Territory with his parents in the year 1872 and has since given his attention to the management of his ranch and to stock raising. For the past twenty-four years he has lived in Bryan County and prior to that period resided in the Cherokee strip. Q. B. Boydstun, spending his youthful days under the parental roof, completed his public school education by study in the Caddo high school and afterward entered the University of Oklahoma in preparation for the bar. He was graduated with the law class of June 10, 1919. He then came to Fort Gibson, where he entered into partnership with R. M. Mountecastle and through the intervening period they have practiced continuously and successfully. Mr. Boydstun was the youngest man to graduate in law from the State University up to that time and not having attained his majority it was necessary for him to secure a permit to practice. He was admitted to the...

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