Location: Brevard County FL

The Archaic Period of Lake Okeechobee

Archaeologists define the Archaic Period in southern Florida as lasting from around 7500 BC to around 500 BC. 1Florida Division of Historical Resources. 10000-3000 BC. During the first half of this period, there were (in geological time) rapid environmental changes in the Florida Peninsula. In the latter half of this period, there were rapid cultural changes in Southeastern North America, but it is not known at the present time how completely those changes were manifested in southern Florida. A cultural connection between the Lake Okeechobee Basin and northeast Georgia remains little known, both inside and outside the archaeology profession....

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Slave Narrative of Titus I. Bynes

Interviewer: Alfred Farrell Person Interviewed: Titus Bynes Location: Titusville, Florida Age: 90 Occupation: Carpenter Titus B. [TR: Titus I. above] Bynes, affectionately known as “Daddy Bynes”, is reminiscent of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s immortal “Uncle Tom” and Joel Chandler Harris’ inimitable ‘Uncle Remus’ with his white beard and hair surrounding a smiling black face. He was born in November 1846 in what is now Clarendon County, South Carolina. Both his father, Cuffy, and mother, Diana, belonged to Gabriel Flowden who owned 75 or 80 slaves and was noted for his kindness to them. Bynes’ father was a common laborer, and his mother acted in the capacity of chambermaid and spinner. They had 12 children, seven boys–Abraham, Tutus[TR:?], Reese, Lawrence, Thomas, Billie, and Hamlet–and five girls–Charity, Chrissy, Fannie, Charlotte, and Violet. When Titus was five or six years of age he was given to Flowden’s wife who groomed him for the job of houseboy. Although he never received any education, Bynes was quick to learn. He could tell the time of day and could distinguish one newspaper from another. He recalled an incident which happened when he was about eight years of age which led him to conceal his precociousness. One day while writing on the ground, he heard his mistress’ little daughter tell her mother that he was writing about water. Mistress Flowden called him and told him that if...

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Slave Narrative of Henry Maxwell

Interviewer: Alfred Farrell Person Interviewed: Henry Maxwell Location: Titusville, Florida Age:  77? Occupation: Field Worker “Up from Slavery” might well be called this short biographical sketch of Henry Maxwell, who first saw the light of day on October 17, 1859 in Lownes County, Georgia. His mother Ann, was born in Virginia, and his father, Robert, was born in South Carolina. Captain Peters, Ann’s owner, bought Robert Maxwell from Charles Howell as a husband for Ann. To this union were born seven children, two girls – Elizabeth and Rosetta – and five boys – Richard, Henry, Simms, Solomon and Sonnie. After the death of Captain Peters in 1863, Elizabeth and Richard were sold to the Gaines family. Rosetta and Robert (the father) were purchased from the Peters’ estate by Isham Peters, Captain Peters’ son, and Henry and Simms were bought by James Bamburg, husband of Izzy Peters, daughter of Captain Peters. (Solomon and Sonnie were born after slavery.) Just a tot when the Civil War gave him and his people freedom, Maxwell’s memories of bondage – days are vivid through the experiences related by older Negroes. He relates the story of the plantation owner who trained his dogs to hunt escaped slaves. He had a Negro youth hide in a tree some distance away, and then he turned the pack loose to follow him. One day he released the bloodhounds...

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Slave Narrative of Josephine Anderson

Interviewer: Jules A. Frost Person Interviewed: Josephine Anderson Location: Tampa, Florida “I kaint tell nothin bout slavery times cept what I heared folks talk about. I was too young to remember much but I recleck seein my granma milk de cows an do de washin. Granpa was old, an dey let him do light work, mosly fish an hunt. “I doan member nothin bout my daddy. He died when I was a baby. My stepfather was Stephen Anderson, an my mammy’s name was Dorcas. He come fum Vajinny, but my mammy was borned an raised in Wilmington. My name was Josephine Anderson fore I married Willie Jones. I had two half-brothers youngern me, John Henry an Ed, an a half-sister, Elsie. De boys had to mind de calves an sheeps, an Elsie nursed de missus’ baby. I done de cookin, mosly, an helped my mammy spin. “I was ony five year old when dey brung me to Sanderson, in Baker County, Florida. My stepfather went to work for a turpentine man, makin barrels, an he work at dat job till he drop dead in de camp. I reckon he musta had heart disease. “I doan recleck ever seein my mammy wear shoes. Even in de winter she go barefoot, an I reckon cold didn’t hurt her feet no moran her hands an face. We all wore dresses made o’...

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Slave Narrative of Della Bess Hilyard

Interviewer: Alfred Farrell Person Interviewed: Della Bess Hilyard (“Aunt Bess”) Location: Titusville, Florida Della Bess Hilyard, or “Aunt Bess” as she is better known, was born in Darlington, South Carolina in 1858, the daughter of Resier and Zilphy Hart, slaves of Gus Hiwards. Both her parents were cotton pickers and as a little girl Della often went with her parents into the fields. One day she stated that the Yankees came through South Carolina with Knapsacks on their shoulders. It wasn’t until later that she learned the reason. When asked if she received any educational training, “Aunt Bess” replied in the negative, but stated that the slaves on the Hiwards plantation were permitted to pick up what education they could without fear of being molested. No one bothered, however, to teach them anything. In regards to religion, “Aunt Bess” said that the slaves were not told about heaven; they were told to honor their masters and mistresses and of the damnation which awaited them for disobedience. After slavery the Hart family moved to Georgia where Della grew into womanhood and at an early age married Caleb Bess by whom she had two children. After the death of Bess, about fifteen years ago, “Aunt Bess” moved to Fort Pierce, Florida. While there she married Lonny Hilyard who brought her to Titusville where she now resides, a relic of bygone...

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Slave Narrative of Taylor Gilbert

Interviewer: Alfred Farrell Person Interviewed: Taylor Gilbert Location: Titusville, Florida Age: 91 Occupation: Farmer Taylor Gilbert was born in Shellman, Georgia, 91 years ago, of a colored mother and a white father, “which is why I am so white”, he adds. He has never been known to have passed as White, however, in spite of the fact that he could do so without detection. David Ferguson bought Jacob Gilbert from Dr. Gilbert as a husband for Emily, Taylor’s mother. Emily had nine children, two by a white man, Frances and Taylor, and seven by Jacob, only three of whom Gilbert remembers – Gettie, Rena, and Annis. Two of these children were sent to school while the others were obliged to work on the plantation. Emily, the mother, was the cook and washwoman while Jacob was the Butler. Gilbert, a good sized lad when slavery was at its height, recalls vividly the cruel lashings and other punishments meted out to those who disobeyed their master or attempted to run away. It was the custom of slaves who wished to go from one plantation to another to carry passes in case they were stopped as suspected runaways. Frequently slaves would visit without benefit of passes, and as result they suffered severe torturing. Often the sons of the slaves’ owners would go “nigger hunting” and nothing – not even murder was too...

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Fresh Water Indians

Fresh Water Tribe (“Agna Dulce”) Indians. A name applied to the people of seven to nine neighboring towns, and for which there is no native equivalent. Fresh Water Connections. The same as Acuera (q. v.). Fresh Water Location. In the coast district of eastern Florida between St. Augustine and Cape Canaveral. Fresh Water Villages The following towns are given in this province extending from north to south, but not all of the native names have been preserved: Anacape, said to have been 20 leagues south of St. Augustine. Antonico, another possible name is Tunsa. Equale, location uncertain. Filache, location uncertain. Maiaca, a few leagues north of Cape Canaveral and on St. Johns River. Moloa, south of the mouth of St. Johns River (omitted from later lists). San Julian, location uncertain. San Sebastian, on an arm of the sea near St. Augustine, destroyed in 1600 by a flood. Tocoy, given by one writer as 5 leagues from St. Augustine; by another as 24 leagues. The names Macaya and Maycoya, which appear in the neighborhood of the last of these are probably synonyms or corruptions of Maiaca, but there seems to have been a sister town of Maiaca at an early date which Fontaneda (1854) calls Mayajuaca or Mayjuaca. In addition to the preceding, a number of town names have been preserved which perhaps belong to places in this province. Some...

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Onathaqua Tribe

Onathaqua Indians (possibly intended for Ouathaqua). A tribe or village about Cape Cañaveral east coast of Florida, in constant alliance with the Calusa in 1564 (Laudionniére). Probably identical in whole or in part with the Ais tribe. Not to be confounded with Onatheaqua. Alternate Spellings: Oathkaqua – De Bry map (1591) in Le Moyne, Narr., Appleton trans., 1875. Onathqua – Laudionniére (1564) in French, Hist. Coll., Louisiana, n.s., 282, 1869 (possibly for Ouathaqua). Onothaca – Brackenridge, Louisiana, 84, 1814. Otchaqua – De l’Isle, map,...

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Kolupke, Sharon L. – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon 1941-2009 Sharon Lee Kolupke, 68, of La Grande, died Oct. 20 at Grande Ronde Hospital. Loveland Funeral Chapel and Crematory is in charge of arrangements. Sharon was born March 11, 1941, to John and Darlene (Schick) Furrenes in Minominc, Mich. She married Larry J. Kolupke on June 11, 1982, in Savannah, Ga. She moved to La Grande from Orlando, Fla., and enjoyed playing golf in her younger years. She is survived by her husband, Larry of La Grande; and her sister, Andrea Konopecky of La Grande. She was preceded in death by her parents. La Grande Observer – October 26,...

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Brevard County Florida Cemetery Records

Florida Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Florida county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Brevard County Cemetery Records Hosted at Brevard County, Florida USGenWeb Archives Cemetery at Cape Canaveral Florida Memorial Gardens (partial listing) Georgiana Graveyard Hilltop Cemetery, a.k.a. Cocoa Black Cemetery Brevard County Cemetery Records Hosted at Interment.net Florida Memorial Gardens Melbourne...

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