Location: Branch County MI

1894 Michigan State Census – Branch County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Branch County. Algansee Township. – Henry W. Hungerford, Alexander Purdy, George W. Stewart, William Thompson, Isaac G. Quimby, Stephen Kyser, James S. Hughey, Russel J. Ellis, Peter P. Tendril, Frank Roundy, Jerome B. Tift, Josephus Clark, L. D. Reynolds, Ira Stockwell, William Herrick, George W. Deye, Hazelton Saunders, William M. Cory, William J. McKee, George L. Rice, Anson W. Merrit, George Baits, Sylvester W. McNitt, Arnold Goodman, Albert A. Dodge, George Winter, F. D. Burlingham, Fred Goodwin, William Emmons, Samuel P. Warren, E. J. Smith, T. A. Smith, C. E. Brainard, Christian Webber, Roswell D. Tift, Edwin W. McNitt, George R. Purdy, Stephen V. Braman, Olney W. Draper, John Flaherty, John H. Corey, William H. Woodard, Sidney Haight, J.H. Adair, Charles Beckwith, William Goodwin, Cornelius Myers, W. M. Sage, Albert J. Tift, [Henry Emmons, Orlando Nash, Corlan E. Brainard, T. J. Nixon, Emmett J. Smith, Samuel Warren, Wesley Merritt, Allison Tift, David M. Draper, Edward W. McNitt, Henry Waterberry, Lafayette Burleson]. Batavia Township – Edwin Lewis, George Cleveland, Lewis Hawley, William H. Fonda, Seymour Fox, Jerome B. Hawley, George Phelps, John W. Mendham, George Davis, A: R. Grove, Wilbur R. Crawford, Henry P. Miller, Samuel Fairbanks, John F. Button, Admiral Burch, Austin Burch, Edward Frederick, Phillip Pitcher,...

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Biography of Gen. John H. Stevens

GEN. JOHN H. STEVENS. – This hero of a hundred Western adventures, and a pioneer of the great Inland Empire, was born on a town line in Windham County, Vermont. The son of Asa Stevens, a miller and farmer, he learned to use his hands and brain in practical affairs, and at the village school obtained a good working education. In his youth he followed business in Boston, and was engaged in lumbering in Pennsylvania. In 1832 he came west to Michigan, and at Coldwater, Branch County, kept a hotel, advancing his business also by taking mail contracts, and in such early ventures as the conditions of life in the Wolverine state afforded at that early day. He became a colonel in the state militia, and succeeded also to a generalship. Eight years he served as sheriff of Branch county, and during that time made many notable arrests. In 1852 he prepared for the journey to Oregon, rigging up a large team of mules and horses, and with his daughter Mary C., who subsequently became the wife of the famous lawyer of Eugene, Oregon, Stukeley Ellsworth, and with thirteen young men, among whom was Green Arnold, now of LaGrande, made the journey across the plains. Although in the midst of the pestilential cholera, he lost but one man. He made a speedy trip, covering the distance from the Missouri...

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Biography of Edward P. Ray

Edward P. Ray. Fortunate is the man who finds his work in the world early in life and concentrates all his energies upon discharging his duties and responsibilities with credit and efficiency. One of this fortunate class was Edward P. Ray of Arkansas City. His father and grandfather before him were in the produce business, established one of the early concerns of that kind in Southern Michigan, and the old house is still flourishing and doing a large business at Coldwater, Michigan, today. Edward P. Ray grew up in that business atmosphere and after breaking home ties and family associations he readily found places of responsibility with other concerns. In the course of his career he came out to Kansas, and for a number of years was manager of the A. S. Kininmonth Company, a produce concern whose activities are practically state wide in Kansas. Mr. Ray was born at Coldwater, Michigan, December 1, 1875, and came of old American Colonial stock. His paternal ancestors settled in New York in the early days. His grandfather, Henry Ray, was born at Oaks Corners in Ontario County, New York, in 1823. For a number of years he was a grocer at Phelps, New York, and organized the produce business which his son, E. F. Ray, still conducts. Henry Ray died at Coldwater, Michigan, in 1885. He came to voting age when...

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Biography of Garner Miner

For thirty-eight years Garner Miner has been a resident of Idaho, having come to the territory in 1861, when the development of this great northwest was in its incipiency and the frontiersmen had to meet many privations and dangers. The Indians were frequently on the warpath, carrying death and devastation wherever they went; and separated from the base of sup-plies, from the comforts and luxuries of the east the pioneers endured hardships undreamed of by the present generation. In those days brave hearts were necessary, indeed, but the same spirit of Anglo-Saxon daring, fortitude and stability, which, has characterized the people of this fair land from its earliest colonization, and has carried the English language and English supremacy to all parts of the globe, found renewed manifestations among the mountains and valleys of Idaho, and thus were laid the foundations of the state, which now occupies a prominent place in the great galaxy of states west of the Mississippi. In all the work of progress and development, in the task of subduing the wild land to the purposes of civilization. Garner Miner bore his part, and now in the evening of life is living retired at his pleasant home in Caldwell, enjoying a well earned rest. Mr. Miner was born in New Haven, Connecticut, on the 5th of November 1822, his parents being John and Mary (Marshall) Miner, also...

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Biographical Sketch of William J. Pullman

Pullman, William J.; building contractor; born, Bronson, Mich., Aug. 21, 1861; son of Joseph E. and Sarah S. Parsons Pullman; married, Bronson, Mich., Nov. 14, 1880, and Cleveland, O., Aug. 15, 1910, Flora C. Kraimer; issue, first wife, two daughters, Faye and Vera; issue, second marriage, one daughter, Madge; member Masons and Royal Arcanum, Sons of Veterans, and K. of...

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Bowman, Carrie Lampe – Obituary

Carrie (Lampe) Bowman, 91, of 114 Cynthia St., died Sept. 3, 1984, at Froh Community Home, Sturgis, following a four-year illness. She was born Nov. 3, 1892 in Burr Oak Township, a daughter of Helmuth Henry and Ida (Waterstraut) Lampe. On Sept. 3, 1912, she married Frank Athol Bowman in Sturgis. He died in 1951. She was a Bronson resident since 1931. She was of the Evangelical Lutheran faith and attended the Bronson Baptist Church for many years. She was employed by the Sturgis Journal from age 16-20, when the owner was E. A. Ferrier. During World War II she was employed at Wright-Patterson, Dayton, Ohio and from 1935 until her retirement at age 65, at the Bronson Reel Co. Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Howard B. (Geraldine) Wolfe, Bronson; one son, Wallace R. Bowman Sr., Sturgis; three grandchildren; six great grandchildren; nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by three sisters and one brother. Relatives and friends may call after 3 p.m. today at the Kubasiak-Kolcz Funeral Home, Bronson. Services are 1 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home with the Rev. Clinton Housely officiating. Burial will be in Oak Lawn Cemetery. Sturgis Journal, September 4, 1984 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biography of C. J. Van Doren

C. J. Van Doren’s extended business experience had been almost entirely in connection with the cement industry. He knows the business in every detail, both on the technical and manufacturing side, and also selling end. Mr. Van Doren is now superintendent of the Great Western Portland Cement Company’s plant at Mildred, Kansas. A native of Michigan, he was born at Adrian July 22, 1874. His paternal ancestry goes back to Peter Van Doren who immigrated from Holland and settled on Long Island between 1637 and 1640. Mr. Van Doren’s grandfather, Jacob Van Doren, a native of New York State, was a pioneer in Southern Michigan, locating on a farm near Adrian in 1837. He spent the rest of his life there. His wife was Drusilla Burgess, who died at Adrian. Chester C. Van Doren, the only child of his parents, and father of C. J. Van Doren, was born at Adrian in 1844, and spent all his life in that section of the state, being a farmer and later a merchant. He was a democrat and a member of the Masonic fraternity. His death ocurred in 1908. He married Sarah Katherine Whittaker, who was born near Toledo, Ohio, in 1845. They were the parents of four children: Dora, wife of Ernest C. Smith, who besides looking after a real estate business at Adrian, Michigan, is one of the leading...

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Biography of C. B. McVay

C. B. McVay is secretary and treasurer of the Western States Portland Cement Company of Independence. He has been identified with the manufacture and sale of cement for over fifteen years, that having been the chief work of his life. He was born in Yankton, South Dakota, in 1878. His ancestors, the McVays, were Scotch people who settled in Pennsylvania more than a century ago. The father, William H. McVay, was born at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1839, was reared and married near Warren County, Ohio, his wife, Rebecca Rutan, being a native of Trumbull County, Ohio. In 1876 he moved out to Yankton, South Dakota, and was a well known banker of that city until his death in 1907. His widow now resides in Portland, Oregon. Politically he was a republican and was a member of the Masonic fraternity. The five children were: Mary, wife of George Wilson, a farmer living at Portland, Oregon; William H., connected with a wholesale hardware house at Portland, Oregon; C. B. McVay; H. G. McVay, a mechanical engineer at Portland; and Catherine B., living with her mother. Mr. McVay attended public school in Yankton and for two years was a student in Yankton College. Leaving school in 1900, he came east to Union City, Michigan, and was assistant chemist of the cement plant there for three years. Returning to Yankton, he spent seven...

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Biography of Hon. William Frederick Sapp

Hon. William Frederick Sapp. It is said that the present democratic national committeeman from Kansas when he came to the state in 1879 arrived on foot. He was young then, and not above such strenuous exercise when the purpose involved was search of location for the beginning of his professional career. He soon afterward obtained admission to the bar before the District Court at Columbus, and as a lawyer and citizen has been identified with Galena almost as long as that town has been on the map. The courage and independence that brought him to Kansas and took him through the difficulties of the early lawyer have brought Mr. Sapp far along the road to prominence and success. He is undoubtedly one of the strongest figures in the democratic party of the state. In 1892 he was a delegate at large to the democratic national convention in Chicago, was democratic candidate in his district for Congress in 1894, and is now in his third successive term as national committeeman from Kansas. His first term ended in 1912, his second in 1916, and at the recent national convention he was again chosen to represent the Sunflower State and this term holds over until the next general campaign in 1920. In 1914 Mr. Sapp was democratic candidate for the United States Senate. He was born at Grand Rapids, Michigan, August 30,...

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