Location: Bourbon County KY

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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Biographical Sketch of S. B. Guthery

S. B. Guthery was born in Pike county, Ohio, October 27, 1817. His grandfather was a colonel in the Revolutionary War, and in 1800 immigrated to the then far West – now the State of Ohio. When our subject was a boy he was employed by William Parmer, of Bourbon county, Kentucky; in keeping training and running fast horses. In 1837 he turned his attention to farming and has followed that business ever since, together with handling stock; with the exception of a short time he was engaged in grading on the Portsmouth & Columbus turnpike in 1840, and conducted a tannery in Scioto county, Ohio, a few years. In April, 1847, he settled upon the farm where he now lives. Mr. Guthery was united in marriage November 21, 1840, to Miss Nancy L. March. She was born January 24, 1822. They had four children: Nancy-dead; William B., born April 3, 1845; James A.-dead; and Sarah-dead. William B. Guthery, son of S. B. Guthery, was born in Lucas county, (Ohio, and lives on the old homestead, where his father settled in 1847. He was educated at Smith’s Mercantile College, of Portsmouth, Ohio, and was engaged from 1869 to 1873 in the mercantile business and in the handling and shipping of mules at Jameson. Since that time he has been engaged in farming. William B. Guthery was united in marriage,...

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Biography of John Davis

John Davis, of Jonesburg, familiarly known as “Uncle John,” is the oldest son of the late Thomas Davis, of Shenandoah Co., Va. John was born October 30, 1791, in Shenandoah County, and is now nearly 85 years of age. When he was about sixteen his parents removed to Bourbon Co., Ky., and when the war of 1812 began, he enlisted in the army and served under Generals Winchester and Payne. He was stationed at Forts Wayne and Laramie, in Ohio, for some time. In 1820 he came to Missouri, and stopped a short time in St. Louis, which then had only one principal street, and most of the houses were made of square posts set upright, with the spaces between filled with straw and mud, the chimneys being built of the same material. The court house was surrounded by a post-and-rail fence, and young Davis was sitting on this fence when the announcement was made that the Territory of Missouri had become a State. From St. Louis Mr. Davis went to Pike County, and settled in Clarksville, where he lived forty-six years. In those days rattlesnakes were much more abundant than they are now, and the old pioneers would occasionally go on “snaking” frolics. They always came back vomiting from the effects of the poisonous smell of the snakes. On one occasion Mr. Davis and his neighbors went to...

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Biographical Sketch of Major Thomas Hughes

Major Thomas Hughes, of Bourbon County, Kentucky, married Lucy Tandy, and their children were William, Gabriel, Thomas, Henry C., Elliott M., James and Susan T. The Major’s first wife died, and he subsequently married her sister, who was a widow at the time. Major Hughes held the position of Justice of the Peace, in Paris, for forty years, and all his decisions were sustained by the higher courts. He also represented Bourbon County in the Kentucky Legislature. His eldest son, William, married his cousin, Margaret Hughes, and settled in Boone County, Missouri. Elliott M. received a classical education, and came to Missouri when a young man, and taught school in and near Danville for several years. He then returned to Kentucky, where he married Jane S. McConnell, and soon after came back to Montgomery County, where he remained until his death, which occurred on the 14th of January, 1862. He exercised a large influence in his community, and was a general favorite with all who knew him. He was fond of practical jokes was full of wit and humor, and became a prominent member of the Evanix Society of Danville. The names of his children living in 1876, are Blanche A., Duncan C., Susan C., Elliott M., Jr., R. H., Arnold, and Tandy. Elliott M., Jr., is Prosecuting Attorney of Montgomery County, and is a rising young lawyer, with...

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Biography of George C. Diestilhorst

George C. Diestilhorst was born in Poile, Hanover, Germany, April 18, 1813, and was there reared to manhood. He received his education in the Lutheran school, of his native place, and his father being a harness-maker by trade, on leaving school he also learned that trade and worked with his father up to the time he was twenty-three years of age, when he emigrated to America, arriving in New York City, May 1, 1836. He was successful in securing a situation in the government harness manufactory in that city, and remained six months, then went on a prospecting tour, seeking employment, to the cities of Schenectady and Buffalo, New York, Cleveland, Ohio, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, reaching this latter city in May, 1837, and worked at his trade there until the following October. He was next employed on a keel-boat on the Ohio River, and went to Cincinnati, thence to Louisville, Kentucky, but was unable to secure work because of his unfamiliarity with the English language. From Louisville he went to New Albany, Indiana, where he worked three weeks at his trade, then went down the Ohio River to Smithland, at the confluence of the Cumberland and Ohio rivers and from there traveled overland on foot, with occasional rides in farm wagons, to Princeton, Kentucky, arriving in December, 1837, and secured employment until the spring of 1838. Next he went...

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Slave Narrative of Harriet Mason

Interviewer: Sue Higgins Person Interviewed: Harriet Mason Location: Garrard County, Kentucky Age: 100 Story of Aunt Harriet Mason age 100-a slave girl: “When I was seven years old my missis took me to Bourbon County, when we got to Lexington I tried to run off and go back to Bryantsville to see my mammy. Mas’r Gano told me if I didn’t come the sheriff would git me. I never liked to go to Lexington since. “One Sunday we was going to a big meetin’ we heared som’in rattling in the weeds. It was a big snake, it made a track in the dust. When we got home missis asked me if I killed any snakes. I said to missis, snake like to got me and Gilbert, too. “They used to have dances at Mrs. Dickerson’s, a neighbor of General Gano (a preacher in the Christian Church). Mrs. Dickerson wouldn’t let the “Padaroes” come to the dances. If they did come, whe[TR:she?] would get her pistol and make them leave. “When General Gano went from Texas to Kentucky, he brought 650 head of horses. He sold all of them but Old Black. “Mas’r Gano went back to Texas to take up a child he had buried there. The boat blowed up, and he came nigh gittin’ drowned. “One time I wus out in Mas’rs wheat field. I would get the...

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Slave Narrative of Kisey McKimm

Interviewer: Betty Lugabill Person Interviewed: Kisey McKimm Location: Ohio Place of Birth: Bourbon County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1853 Age: 83 Betty Lugabill, Reporter [TR: also reported as Lugabell] Harold Pugh, Editor R.S. Drum, Supervisor Jun 9, 1937 Folklore: Ex-Slaves Paulding Co., District 10 KISEY McKIMM Ex-Slave, 83 years Ah was born in Bourbon county, sometime in 1853, in the state of Kaintucky where they raise fine horses and beautiful women. Me ‘n my Mammy, Liza ‘n Joe, all belonged to Marse Jacob Sandusky the richest man in de county. Pappy, he belonged to de Henry Young’s who owned de plantation next to us. Marse Jacob was good to his slaves, but his son, Clay was mean. Ah remembah once when he took mah Mammy out and whipped her cauz she forgot to put cake in his basket, when he went huntin’. But dat was de las’ time, cauz de master heard of it and cussed him lak God has come down from Hebbin. Besides doin’ all de cookin’ ‘n she was de best in de county, mah Mammy had to help do de chores and milk fifteen cows. De shacks of all de slaves was set at de edge of a wood, an’ Lawse, honey, us chillun used to had to go out ‘n gatha’ all de twigs ‘n brush ‘n sweep it jes’ lak a floor. Den...

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Slave Narrative of George Conrad, Jr.

Person Interviewed: George Conrad, Jr. Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Connersville, Harrison County, Kentucky Date of Birth: February 23, 1860 Age: 77 I was born February 23, 1860 at Connersville, Harrison County, Kentucky. I was born and lived just 13 miles from Pariah. My mother’s name is Rachel Conrad, born at Bourbon County, Kentucky. My father, George Conrad, was born at Bourbon County Kentucky. My grandmother’s name is Sallie Amos, and grandfather’s name is Peter Amos. My grandfather, his old Master freed his and he bought my grandmother, Aunt Liza and Uncle Cy. He made the money by freighting groceries from Ohio to Mayaville, Kentucky. Our Master was named Master Joe Conrad. We sometimes called him “Mos” Joe Conrad. Master Joe Conrad stayed in a big log house with weather. boarding on the outside. I was born in a log cabin. We slept in wooden beds with rope cords for slats, and the beds had curtains around them. You see my mother was the cook for the Master, and she cooked everything chicken, roasting ears. She cooked mostly everything we have now. They didn’t have stoves; they cooked in big ovens. She skillets had three legs. I can remember the first stove that we had. I guess I was about six years old. My old Master had 900 acres of land. My father was a stiller. He...

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Biography of Sidney Walter Moss

SIDNEY WALTER MOSS. – Mr. Moss is a venerable and noticeable character among the pioneers, not only for his long residence in Oregon, but for the esteem in which he has ever been held by the people. He has, in an eminent degree, that quality for which the early Oregonians have been remarkable, – liberality. He was born in Paris, Kentucky, March 17,1810. His father, Moses Moss, was a Baptist minister; and his mother, Katherine Buckford Moss, was a woman of great force and elevation of character. The young man learned the trade of stone-cutting, and in 1828 left Kentucky for Ohio. He found an abundance of work in the Buckeye state, but in 1837 went on to Indiana, working at Madison and on the Madison & Indianapolis Railway. At the state capital he erected two bank buildings. In 1839 he was back in Kentucky working on lock three on the Licking river canal. In 1841 he was at Fort Smith in full charge of the stone-cutting department in work then under construction. But a desire for the wild West there overtook him; and he joined the company of Doctor White for Oregon. That was the first genuine immigration; and the particulars are given elsewhere. At Waiilatpu Mr. Moss met Doctor Whitman, and remembers his inquiries about the Ashburton treaty, and in what shape Oregon would be left, and...

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Biography of James Quincy Thomas

James Quincy Thomas of Mahomet is now in his eighty-ninth year. It is a remarkable span of life which his years cover. He was born when Andrew Jackson was President of the United States. Not a permanent settlement had been fixed in Champaign County at the time of his birth. There were no railroads in America, no telegraph lines, very few canals, and none of the labor-saving devices which have transformed industry and social life. As a young man he swung the flail and the scythe in cutting and threshing grain, and not only actively experienced all the hardships of that primitive time, but has lived on until he has witnessed flying machines and other wonders of the electrical twentieth century. Mr. Thomas has lived in Champaign County for more than half a century. He is certainly one of the oldest citizens of the county and is perhaps the only survivor of the Mexican War living in this county. He was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, November 26, 1828, the only son and only surviving child of William E. and Mary (Thomas) Thomas. He had four sisters. His father was born in Loudoun County, Virginia, and as a boy he saw General George Washington. He grew up in his native state and moved to Kentucky, where he married. He died in Kentucky in 1863. As a young man he...

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Biographical Sketch of William Barnett

William Barnett, farmer, P. O. Ionia, was born in Bourbon County, Ky., July 8, 1824. Removed to Vermillion County, Ill. Came to Jewell County, Kan., in 1871, and took a homestead, and is now the owner of 320 acres of land. Held the office of School Treasurer for nine years last past. Was married in Vermillion County, Ill., September 17, 1851, to Miss A. J. Walston, now deceased. Was married a second time in Edwards County, Ill., in December 1856, to Miss Nancy Barnett. He is the father of four children – Susan J., Robert, Martha E. and Lolie. Mr. Barnett is one of Jewell County’s best and most respected citizens, and has done much toward the up building of the...

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Biographical Sketch of the Lamme Brothers

William T. and James Lamme were sons of Robert Lamme, of Bourbon Co., Ky. William T. settled in (now) Warren Co., Mo., in 1803. He was 1st Lieutenant in Nathan Boone’s company of rangers, and was afterward major of a regiment. He married Frances Callaway, daughter of Flanders Callaway, and granddaughter of Daniel Boone, by whom he had ten children Serena, Zarina, Hulda, Cornelia, Missouri, Josephine, Jackson, Leonidas, Achiles, and. Napoleon B. Mr. Lamme had a good education, was a fine business man, and left his family in good circumstances at his death. Zarina Lamme married Willis Bryan, a son of David Bryan, who was the first settler within the present limits of Warren County. Hulda married John Bryan, called “Long Jack,” on account of his extraordinary height, who was also a son of David Bryan. Missouri married Jesse Caton. Josephine married Campbell Marshall. All of the above are dead except Hulda, who lives with her son, John C., who is Recorder of Franklin County, and a prominent and influential citizen. Achiles Lamme lives in Montana, where he carries on an extensive mercantile business. Napoleon B. lives in California. Serena married Lewis...

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Biography of Jeremiah Hays

Jeremiah Hays, of Ireland, married Jane Moore, of Scotland, and came to America and settled in Bourbon County, Kentucky, where they had Mary, Delila, Nancy, Joanna, Absalom, Jane, Thomas, Joseph, and Mahala. Mr. Hays, with his wife and two daughters, Jane and Mahala, started to Montgomery County, Mo., but when they reached St. Louis he died. His widow and children settled near Marthasville. Jane married Oliver McCleur, of Pennsylvania, who was a blacksmith, and settled in Warren County. Mahala married John Ward, of Kentucky, who was a hatter, and also settled in Warren County. Absalom and Joseph Hays came to Missouri with Dr. John Young, in 1816. Joseph married Kate Mahoney, and settled in Montgomery County. Absalom was the second Sheriff of Montgomery County, and after the organization of Warren, he was elected the first Sheriff of that County, which office he held alternately until 1845. He married Anna Skinner, of Montgomery County, by whom he had Jeremiah, Susan, John A., Jane, and Mary C. The year after Mr. Hays’ marriage he had to attend Court at Lewiston, and took his wife and little child with him to her father’s, who lived on Camp Branch, to remain while he was at court. But the session lasted longer than he expected, and his wife, impatient to be at home, persuaded her father to go with her. The journey was too...

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Childers, J. P. – Obituary

Summerville, Union County, Oregon A Paralytic Stroke Mr. J. P. Childers, an aged resident of Summerville, suffered a stroke of paralysis about half-past one o’clock Wednesday afternoon. He had been up and around during the day and was in his usual health up to the time of the attack. His condition is considered very critical. Separate Column (same newspaper) James P. Childers, an old and respected citizen of Union County, died Friday afternoon at his home near Summerville. Death was the result of a stroke of paralysis that came last Wednesday. Eastern Oregon Semi-Weekly Republican Volume VIII, Number 28 Brief Local News Wednesday, November 6, 1895 Page 3 Quietly Passed Away James P. Childers has passed to the Great Beyond. James P. Childers, an old and respected citizen of Union County, is dead. He passed away Friday afternoon at four o’clock at his home near Summerville. His death was the result of a stroke of paralysis last Wednesday. Mr. Childers was seventy-three years of age and has lived in Union county since 1865, residing continuously in the same home. James P. Childers was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, December 1, 1822. At an early age he removed to Illinois, from there he went to Missouri and from Missouri he came to this country in 1865. He has raised a family of six boys who are respected citizens today. The...

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Biography of Richard O. Wells

Richard O. Wells, farmer; P. O. Westfield; was born in Bourbon Co., Ky., Dec. 29, 1809; he remained there with his parents until he was 25 years of age assisting on the farm; his father died there in the year 1835; his mother surviving him until the year 1860. Mr. Wells, while at home in Kentucky was married August, 1831, to Miss Jenette Boston (daughter of William Boston of Kentucky); she was born July 15, 1815; shortly after his marriage, he moved upon a farm near that of his father’s, where he lived until his removal to Clark Co., in 1837; the next year he moved to Coles Co. and settled on Sec. 6, where he lived three years, and then returned to Clark Co. and from there, in 1843, moved back to Kentucky and after remaining ten years, in the year 1853, came to Coles Co. and settled upon Sec. 7, where he has since resided. He owns 111 acres; has been School Director one term. They had twelve children, seven boys, three living – Richard J., born May 29, 1849; Robert L., August 11, 1853, and Charles M., born Jan. 22, 1856, and four deceased-Preston, born Oct. 22, 1832, died in 1842; James F. M., born April 1, 1836, died in 1865; William H., born July 17, 1840, died in 1850; and Leroy B., born April 6,...

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