Location: Boone County KY

Biography of Capt. Thomas Smith

CAPTAIN. THOMAS SMITH. – Captain Smith, the intrepid Indian fighter and pioneer, has seen the beginning of every Indian disturbance in Southern Oregon; and his narratives are therefore of peculiar interest. He was born September 14, 1809, in Campbell County, Kentucky. At the age of seventeen he removed with his recently widowed mother to Boone County, and learned the trade of a carpenter. In 1839 he went to Texas, and in 1849 formed a party designated as the Equal Rights Company, to cross the plains by the southern route via El Paso and the Gila River to California. The journey was notably difficult, chiefly from the excessive heat and lack of water. Captain Smith’s indomitable spirit had many occasions in which to be tested, as when he recovered a horse and mule from the Pima Indians on the Gila, or led his column – seventy-five men and two hundred and fifty animals – across the desert, following Colonel Crook’s trail by the animals of the government train which had died and had dried up by reason of the desert air, and finding water and grass on a sunken river and at a small lake. Arrived in California in the autumn, Captain Smith’s experiences in the mines at Dry Creek, Oroville, and on the Feather River, were of the checkered character of the argonauts, – more of sickness and ill...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of William B. Hawkins

William B. Hawkins, retired farmer; P. O. Humbolt; the subject of this sketch is one of the early settlers of this township; he was born in Boone Co., Ky., July 31, 121. He married Miss Abigail Morgan Feb. 20, 1843; she was born in Ohio, and died Oct. 8, 1846; they had two children, viz., Francis M. and Louisa A.; his present wife was Miss Nancy Danner; they were married Oct. 4, 1848; she was born in Rush Co., Ind., Oct. 11, 1823; he lived about two and a half years in Kentucky,. when, with his parents, he moved to Rush Co., Ind., where they engaged in farming; he lived there until 1840; be then came to Illinois and engaged by the month on a farm on the Okaw, now in Coles Co.; he lived there about eighteen months, then went to Indiana, and lived there until 1850, when he again came to Coles Co. and settled in Humbolt Tp., about one mile from the present village of Humbolt; at this time there were less than one dozen settlers in this township; he lived on his farm until 1865, then here to the village; he was the first Township Collector in this township and served in offices connected with the school and road; he yet retains the old homestead, he takes no active part in its management; in 1866,...

Read More

Margaret Garner and Seven Others – Fugitive Slave Law

Of this recent and peculiarly painful case we give a somewhat detailed account, mainly taken from the Cincinnati papers of the day. About ten o’clock on Sunday, 27th January, 1856, a party of eight slaves – —two men, two women, and four children— – belonging to Archibald K. Gaines and John Marshall, of Richwood Station, Boone County, Kentucky, about sixteen miles from Covington, escaped from their owners. Three of the party are father, mother, and son, whose names are Simon, Mary, and Simon, Jr.; the others are Margaret, wife of Simon, Jr., and her four children. The three first are the property of Marshall, and the others of Gaines. They took a sleigh and two horses belonging to Mr. Marshall, and drove to the river bank, opposite Cincinnati, and crossed over to the city on the ice. They were missed a few hours after their flight, and Mr. Gaines, springing on a horse, followed in pursuit. On reaching the river shore, he learned that a resident had found the horses standing in the road. He then crossed over to the City, and after a few hours diligent inquiry, he learned that his slaves were in a house about a quarter of a mile below the Mill Creek Bridge, on the river road, occupied by a colored man named Kite. He proceeded to the office of United States Commissioner John...

Read More

Boone County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Boone County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Boone County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Boone County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Boone County USGenWeb Archives Project 1810 Census Index Part 1 1810 Census Index Part 2 Hosted at US Census.Org 1810 Census Index Census Transcription Hosted at RootsWeb 1810 Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Boone County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Boone County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Boone County USGenWeb Archives Project 1820 Census Index Surname Index A – Z 1820 Federal Census Part 1 1820 Federal Census Part 2 Hosted at US Census.Org Surname Index A – Z Census Transcription Part 1 Census Transcription Part 2 Hosted at RootsWeb 1820 Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Boone County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Boone County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Boone...

Read More

Boone County, Kentucky Cemetery Records

Hosted at Boone County USGenWeb Archives Project Thomas Anderson Family Cemetery Baker Cemetery Baker Family Cemetery Beaver Lick Christian Church Cemetery Botts Cemetery Bullittsburg Baptist Church Cemetery Bullittsburg Baptist Church Cemetery , Part 2 Carpenter Cemetery “Catholic” Cemetery Chambers Cemetery Christy Family Cemetery Concord Cemetery Conley Cemetery Constance Cemetery East Bend Baptist Church Cemetery Harrison-Pike Family Cemetery McClure Cemetery Old Richardson Cemetery Peeno Cemetery Petersburg Cemetery Price Pike Cemetery Powers Cemetery Rice Cemetery Salem Predestinarion Baptist Church Cemetery Sand Run Baptist Church Cemetery , Partial Stansifer-Utz Cemetery Stephens Cemetery South Fork Christian Church Cemetery Watts Cemetery Hosted at Boone County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Acra Cemetery Aylor Cemetery Edwin Baker Cemetery Bernard Cemetery Big Bone Lick Baptist Church Cemetery Black Cemetery Brown Cemetery Carr Cemetery Colonal Abraham Depew Grave Craig Cemetery Dinsmore Cemetery Finnell/Burton/Roberts Cemetery Florence Cemetery Foster Cemetery Garnett-Baker Airport Cemetery Hance Cemetery Johnson-Wilson Cemetery Marshall Family Cemetery Marshall Family Cemetery Continued New Bethel Baptist Church Cemetery Old Burlington Cemetery Richwood Presbyterian Church Cemetery Snow Cemetery Cemetery Souther Family Cemetery Tanner Family Cemetery Wilson Family Cemetery Hosted at Interment.net Chambers Cemetery Constance Cemetery Peeno Cemetery Stephens Cemetery...

Read More

Biography of Hon. James Abner Bennett

HON. JAMES ABNER BENNETT. – Our subject was born in Bracken county, Kentucky, on March 17,1808. His birthplace was a farm; and here he remained with his parents until 1830, when he moved to Boone county. He resided here for three years, and then removed to Jackson county, Missouri, near the town of Independence, and in 1839 again removed to Platt county. The following year, 1840, he was married to Miss Louisa E.R. Bane, of Weston, Missouri. Here Mr. Bennett remained, following blacksmithing and conducting a livery stable. He also acted as justice of the peace until the year 1842. There also was a son born to them, John R. Bennett. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett moved from here to Jackson county, Missouri, where they lived until 1850, in the meanwhile suffering the loss of their son, who died April 18,1848. In 1849 Mr. Bennett came on a prospecting tour to California. On his return, Mrs. Bennett made preparations and started with him for Oregon, traveling with ox-teams in company with some thirty other families, Judge Bennett being elected captain of the train. They started on May 9th, and after a wearisome journey of five months’ duration reached Oregon on October 2, 1850. They at once located on their beautiful farm near Corvallis; and, the settlers soon recognizing true worth, he was elected a senator in the territorial legislature from...

Read More

Biography of Hon. John Bird

HON. JOHN BIRD. – This venerable pioneer of our state comes from that stock of state-makers and town-builders who have ever been at the front. He was born in 1810 in Boone county, Kentucky, and lived there with his father until the year 1827, thereafter making Illinois his home until 1847. In the latter year he joined the train of Captain Sawyer, and set forth for Oregon, starting from Missouri about the 1st of May. Upon the trip nothing was more notable than the appearance of about one hundred Pawnee Indians, who laid a blanket on the ground for the emigrants as they passed to drop in a contribution of flour, and the shooting with arrows of two valuable horses by the same Indians. The toils, adventures and exertions, of vast interest and importance, were of the same character as of the early thousands who made the long journey. Crossing the Cascade Mountains by the Barlow Road the 1st of October, Mr. Bird passed his first winter in our state at Linn City, opposite Oregon City, and indeed made this point his home until 1849. In that memorable year of gold he went to the California mines, but did not “strike it rich,” and after deliberation decided that the better place to make a fortune was in the rich valleys of Oregon. Returning therefore to our state he selected...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest