Location: Boone County IL

Biography of Rev. Arthur Buckminster Fuller

REV. ARTHUR BUCKMINSTER FULLER, the third son of Hon. Timothy Fuller, was born August 10, 1822. He was early instructed by his father and his sister, Margaret Fuller. At the age of twelve, he spent one year at Leicester Academy; and, subsequently, studied with Mrs. Ripley, the wife of Rev. Samuel Ripley, of Waltham. In August, 1839, he entered Harvard College, at the age of seventeen, and graduated in 1843. During his college course he united with the church connected with the University. Immediately on graduation he purchased Belvidere Academy, in Belvidere, Boone Co., Illinois, Which, assisted by a competent corps of instructors, he taught for the two subsequent years. During this time, Mr. Fuller occasionally preached, as a missionary, in Belvidere and destitute places, and also to the established churches, having been interested in theological study during his senior year at college. He was a member of the Illinois Conference of Christian and Unitarian ministers, and by them licensed to preach. His first sermon was preached October, 1843, in Chicago, to the Unitarian church then under the charge of Rev. Joseph Harrington. In 1845 Mr. Fuller returned to New England; entered, one year in advance, the Harvard Divinity School, whence he graduated in August, 1847. After preaching three months at West Newton, to a church of which Hon. Horace Mann was a principal founder and a constant attendant,...

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Biography of Marcus A. Low

No intelligent resident of Kansas would dispute the assertion that in Marcus A. Low, of Topeka, is found one of the really big men of the state. He is a man of many achievements. His ability in the law had led to distinguished position with great corporations; his ranching and developing of oil and gas properties have been conducted on so large a scale as seemingly might have been weighty enough interests to engage the ordinary man; his political foresight and intnition have caused his selection for public office as high as he would accept, but not upon these evidences of keen foresight and broad vision rests Mr. Low’s most enduring fame. It is as a railroad builder he will be recalled by the people of Kansas who have so proflted through his tireless energy. Marcus A. Low was born August 1, 1842, in the State of Maine. When four years old his parents, Frederick P. and Mary J. (Robinson) Low, moved to Belvidere, Boone County, Illinois, where the father engaged in farming and other occupations. In 1869 the family moved to Hamilton, Missouri, and that place continued to be the home of the parents during the remainder of their lives. In the public schools of Belvidere Marcus A. Low continued until he was fifteen years of age, at which time he entered the academy at Auburn, Maine, with...

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Biography of William Taylor

For twenty-eight years William Taylor has resided in Latah County, and is therefore one of the honored pioneer farmers of the locality. He has not only witnessed the entire growth and development of this section of the state, but has ever borne his part in the work of progress, and his name should be enduringly inscribed on the pages of its history. A native of the Emerald Isle, he was born in county Armagh, Ireland, April 15, 1820, his parents being Joseph and Elizabeth (Rankin) Taylor. In 1840 the father came to America, bringing with him his wife and seven children. They made the voyage on the sailing vessel Fairfield, and were five weeks on the passage. They took up their residence on Bonus prairie, Boone county, Illinois, near where the city of Belvidere now stands, the father purchasing forty acres of land, from which he developed a fine farm. The city of Chicago was then but a little muddy village and the country was largely unimproved. Both he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian Church, were highly respected people, and each lived to the age of seventy-three rears. William Taylor, their eldest child, was educated in his native land, and learned the mason’s trade, serving a five years’ apprenticeship. After becoming a resident of Illinois he followed that pursuit, doing much of the work in his...

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Biography of Oliver Franklin Winner

Oliver Franklin Winner. The excellent business standing of Oliver Franklin Winner rests upon many years of connection with agricultural affairs in Shawnee County, where he is still the owner of a large and valuable property. Particularly is he known as an authority upon the subject of alfalfa growing, to which he has devoted many years of study and investigation. Mr. Winner is an Illinoisan by nativity, and was born at Belvidere, Boone County, in 1859, being a son of Martin W. Winner. Martin W. Winner was born in New York, from which state he emigrated as a young man to Bremer County, Iowa, being a resident of Waverly at the time of the Civil war. He was a stanch Union man and endeavored to enlist in the army of the North, but owing to a slight physical disability was rejected. For twelve years he was engaged in the harness business, but eventually turned his attention to farming, in which vocation he continued to be engaged until his death, in 1901. Mr. Winner was married in 1858 to Miss Nancy Farr, of Boone County, Illinois, and they became the parents of two daughters and five sons: Oliver Franklin, of this review; Ida, who died in 1891; Clarence, who is traveling in the South; Albert, who is a farmer at Janesville, Iowa; Millie, who died in 1891; and Walter Harvey and...

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Biography of George B. Keeler

There is no man who has taken more active and helpful part in the development of Bartlesville and Washington county than George B. Keeler. He has resided in this section of the state from early pioneer times and was adopted into the Cherokee tribe in 1872. He understands the sign language of all of the Indian tribes and speaks the Osage tongue. He has been in a way a connecting link between the Indian life and customs of an early day and the modern civilization and progress. His business activity has covered a wide scope, leading directly to the improvement, settlement and up building of this section of the country, where he has lived from pioneer times, Nelson F. Carr being the only white man who has resided in this part of the state for a longer period. Mr. Keeler came to the southwest from Illinois, his birth having occurred at Hennepin, Putnam county, February 7, 1850. His father, Alson Keeler, was a native of Kyler, Courtland county, New York, and in an early day removed to Illinois, where he resided until 1856. He had followed merchandising in the quaint old town of Hennepin. on the Illinois river, but when his son, George, was a lad of six years he removed with his family to Vernon county, Wisconsin, where he remained for about a decade, devoting three or four...

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Biography of James H. Roe

James H. Roe, a member of the firm of Holmes, Roe & Pierson, the publishers of the Riverside Daily Press and Weekly Horticulturist, is classed among the pioneers of Riverside, and for the sixteen years preceding this writing has been prominently connected with the interests and industries of the colony. The brief facts gathered relating to his life are of interest: He was born in Birmingham, England, in 1843, his parents being the Rev. Charles Hill, a native of the north of Ireland, and Mary (Steadman) Roe, a native of England. His father emigrated with his family to the United States in 1851, and located in Boone County, Illinois, where he was engaged in his ministerial duties until the breaking out of the civil war, when he entered the United States service as a chaplain, and later was the superintendent of the Freedmen’s Aid Commission, having jurisdiction of the affairs of that association in the southwest. He was a sincere Christian, a philanthropist and able orator, and visited England delivering lectures, and obtaining aid for the suffering freedmen of the South. Mr. Roe was reared and schooled in Boone County until 1859, when he entered the University of Chicago and was diligently pursuing his course of study in that institution when the breaking out of the war induced him to abandon his college studies and tender his aid. In...

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Biography of E. J. Whittle

E. J. Whittle, of Arkansas City, had had a most diversified business experience. He had lived in many states, had been a farmer, merchant, real estate man and is now enjoying the income from his property and residing in comfort and contentment among his children and grandchildren. Mr. Whittle was born in Boone County, Illinois, February 20, 1851. His father, James Whittle, was born in Canada, near Detroit, Michigan, in 1821, and was the first of the family to come to the United States. James’ father, Thomas, spent all his life in Canada as a farmer. The Whittles went from England to Canada in the early days. James Whittle grew up in Canada, and when a young man removed to Boone County, Illinois, where he married and took up farming. He spent his active years as an agriculturist and died at Belvidere, Illinois, in 1904. After becoming an American citizen he voted regularly with the republican party. In his home district in Boone County, Illinois, he served as constable and township trustee. His church was the Universalist. James Whittle married Josephine Early. She too was a native of Canada, born in 1831, and died at Poplar Grove, Illinois, in 1887. There were four children, E. J. Whittle being the oldest. Fred, the next youngest, died in infancy. W. P. Whittle was a California gold miner, and shortly after his...

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Biography of Jay A. Kellogg

JAY A. KELLOGG. – This gentleman is a native of Illinois, where he was born in Boone county, February 21, 1851. He is a son of Eli D. Kellogg. His mother’s maiden name was Margaret J. Passage. When he was eight years old, the family crossed the plains to California and settled at Weaverville in that state. He there received the rudiments of his education at the public school, and continued his studies at St. Joseph College in Humboldt county. After a residence of ten years in Weaverville, Mr. Kellogg engaged in the lumber business in Humboldt county. In the general depression of 1879 in that line of business, he disposed of his interest, and in March of that year came to Washington Territory, selecting the thriving town of Dayton as his future home. He was there engaged in mercantile business for two years. Converting his business again into cash, he was occupied in various pursuits until his election as auditor of Columbia county in November, 1884. The ability with which he discharged the duties of that position caused him to be re-elected in 1886. He has also been a member of the common council. Having full confidence in the future of his adopted home, his investments from time to tome have been in real estate. The rapid increase in population of the Inland Empire at large and Dayton...

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Biography of William Dresser

William Dresser the proprietor of extensive farms and a resident of Santa Ana, was born in East Smithfield, London, England, August 20, 1813. His parents, Christopher and Mary Dresser, came to America in 1824, landing at Montreal. Subsequently they settled in northern New York, in 1833 in Ohio, and in 1836 in Boone County, Illinois, They had four children. His father was born January 1, 1769, and died June 13, 1841; and his mother, born June 25, 1772, died November 9, 1845. By trade his father was a “linen draper,” which in England corresponds with a dry-goods merchant in the United States. Mr. Dresser was educated at Alleghany College, Meadville, Pennsylvania. Afterward he followed forming in Boone County, Illinois, until 1850, when he came to California. He had intended to come the previous year, but the company which he was to join did not organize. In April, 1850, he started with a Beloit, Wisconsin, company. They arrived at Council Bluffs May 10, passed the Humboldt desert on the night of the 4th and 5th of July, and between Council Bluffs and Carson Valley they probably passed 30,000 immigrants. July 19 Mr. Dresser first saw the gold miners at work. He arrived at Ringgold on the 20th, and was at Kelsey’s Diggings when they received the news that California had been admitted to the Union. Mr. Dresser is a farmer...

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Biography of Carlton D. Akin

Among the prominent men of Wallowa County, as also one of the leading property owners in the county stands the subject of this brief article and it is with pleasure that we accord to him a representation of this volume of the county’s history, both because he has achieved a success here that demonstrates his ability in the business world and also because commensurate with his general capabilities there have been manifested a stanch and well rounded character, moral qualities of intrinsic worth and integrity unswerving and continuous all of which demonstrate Mr. Akin to be a typical man and foremost and steady in the development of the county. Carlton D. was born in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, on February 5, 1840, being the son of Chancy and Laney (Golden) Akin. Four years after his birth our subject was removed by his parents to Boone county, Illinois and thence soon after to Kane county. In this latter place he had the distinction of seeing the first train of cars run into Elgin, the same coming from Chicago and being in the year 1852. Our subject received a good common school education in the various vicinities where he resided and spent the rest of his years of minority in the blacksmith shop and on the farm with his father, learning that king of all trades while still a lad. Soon after...

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Biography of Chancy Akin

If there is one person more than another to whom the race loves to do honor that person is the pioneer, and especially is this true in double measure when we find one of the character of the worthy subject of this sketch, who has endured all the deprivations incident to pioneer life in this country since the early days of the last century and has through it all maintained a good physique, held his powers intact while accomplishing Herculean achievements, built a character which is a light to any community, kept his reputation untarnished and steadily pursued his way for nearly one hundred years. We doubt not that one might hunt the state of Oregon over and not find another who has a record to compare with Mr. akin to whom we do with pleasure accord a space in this history of Wallowa County and we would gladly, were it in our power, outline in more complete detail his most interesting career. On March 23, 1812, the year in which British cannons were silenced forever on Independence soil, the subject of this sketch opened his eyes to the light in Chenango County, New York, and began a career that has shown as a light in the rolling of two centuries. His parents were Loton and Sarah Akin. When Chancy was twelve years of age he went to Crawford...

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