Location: Boise Idaho

The Growth Of Quartz Mining Discoveries

Prospecting early indicated that the future mineral wealth of Idaho would depend upon quartz mining, and accordingly efforts were early made to develop that feature of Idaho’s principal industry. In the autumn of 1863 it was found that thirty-three claims of gold and silver quartz-mines had been made on the south Boise alone, ail of which promised well. The Ida Elmore, near the head of Bear creek, the first and most famous of the south Boise quartz mines in that year, was discovered in June. In an arastra it yielded two hundred and seventy dollars to the ton of rock; but at length it fell into the hands of speculators. The next several mines of this class were the Barker, East Barker, Ophir, Idaho, Independence, Southern Confederacy, Esmeralda, General Lane, Western Star, Golden Star, Mendocino, Abe Lincoln, Emmett and Hibernia. The Idaho assayed, thirty feet below the surface, one thou-sand seven hundred and forty-four dollars in gold and ninety-four dollars and eighty-six cents in silver; Golden Eagle, two thousand two hundred and forty dollars in gold and twenty-seven dollars in silver, from the croppings. At the Ida Elmore a town was laid out called Fredericksburg, and other towns were also laid out elsewhere, many of which remained towns only in the imagination. Rocky Bar, however, laid out in 1864, beautifully materialized, while Boise City, founded at the junction of...

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Prominent Cities and Towns of the State

Boise, The Capital City The following descriptive article is an excerpt from the souvenir edition of the Boise Sentinel, issued in June 1897: So much has been said and written and sung of “Boise, the Beautiful,” that the task of saying any-thing new seems utterly hopeless; and of this there is little need. While those who have made their homes here from the beginning, and those who from year to year have come to stay, might naturally be expected to be most fervent in their praises, they have not always been the happiest in laying appropriate tributes before the shrine of the object of their love and admiration. Strangers and transient visitors have often been more fortunate in their offerings. Perhaps the first question that arises in the mind of a stranger in regard to this locality is why was it so named. After more than a third of a century has passed since the first human habitation was erected on the present site of the town, and after the story has been so often repeated in print, the inquiry continues to be daily made. Why Boise? Briefly, this is what the ancient chroniclers tell of the origin of the name: In the summer of 1834 a party of French Canadian voyagers, belonging to the expedition of Captain Bonneville (whose explorations and adventures were afterward immortalized by the pen...

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Internal Improvements

In 1892 twenty thousand dollars was voted by congress for the improvement of Snake river, and one hundred thousand dollars for the Boise public building. The river and harbor appropriation bill, passed by congress in April, 1896, carried twenty-five thousand dollars for the improvement of the Clearwater River, and five thousand dollars for the Kootenai between Bonner’s ferry and the British boundary. The appropriation for the Boise public building was increased from one hundred and fifty thousand dollars to two hundred thousand dollars and a building site was selected which cost seventeen thousand and five hundred dollars. Of the special land grants to the state by the national government, aggregating over six hundred thousand acres, only one-sixth remained to be settled in 1897. Assessed Valuation of Property The total assessed valuation of the state in 1894, exclusive of railroad property, was $22,942,910, which was about fifteen per cent, less than that of the preceding year. The railroad assessment was about eight million dollars. The assessment of the main lines of all railroads for this year was fixed at six thousand and five hundred dollars a mile, including rolling stock; branch lines at five thousand dollars a mile, and narrow-gauges at four thousand dollars a mile. The assessment on telegraph lines was at the rate of fifty dollars a mile for poles and the first wire, and twelve dollars and...

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The Mining Fields Of Idaho

The following excellent monograph by W. C. Austin was issued in pamphlet form early in the present year (1899) by authority of C. J. Bassett, state commissioner of immigration, labor and statistics, and as a valuable contribution to the history of the great mining industry of Idaho is held to be worthy of reproduction in this work: There is no other country on God’s green earth that has encompassed within her borders such vast and varied mineral wealth as Idaho. The position that Idaho occupies in the western mineral world is like a wagon wheel, of which Idaho is the hub, while her great mineral belts, radiating out from her mountain fastnesses, penetrating her sister states and enriching them, represent the spokes. Place yourself before a map and trace out several of these great mineral belts. Beginning in the southern part of California, the belt runs through Eldorado, Mariposa and Calaveras counties, thence to Bodie across into Nevada in a northeasterly course, giving birth to the great Comstock lode and other camps, through by Winnemucca, and in Idaho makes its grand entry at Silver City and De Lamar, in Owyhee county; thence on in through Rocky Bar and Atlanta, Custer and Bonanza; thence on to central Idaho, at Gibbonsville. Here the opposite spoke to the great mineral wheel comes in and penetrates the Rocky mountains on into Montana, where...

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Biography of Augustus Titus

AUGUSTUS H. TITUS is a man that has a wide range of experience both in the affairs of life in its ordinary occupations and also in pioneer experiences, having passed through practically all the various vocations usually met with in frontier life, as mining, camping, opening up a new farm, as well as the incidents of danger and adventure with which such existence is frequently attended, beside much fighting with the savages in various places; universally manifesting both a cool and wise judgment and capabilities and valor and courage that are the constituent parts of the true man and progressive spirit. Mr. Titus was born on July 17, 1843, in Morgan county, Illinois, being the son of Noah and Melissa Titus, and when a child was taken by his parents near Quincy, Adams county, in the same state. He remained on the farm with his parents until he was twenty-one years of age, and then followed the advice of Horace Greeley, and embarked on the weary journey across plains and mountains to the Pacific coast. When as far as the Black Hills on their journey, they were attacked by the Indians, who killed four men, one colored boy, and captured two women, one of whom was released in a few days and the other was detained for three years before she made her escape. The train proceeded from this...

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Early Settlers of Boise and Boise Valley, Idaho

Calvin F. Bodfish, one of the pioneers of Ada County, was a native of Maine, whence he went to Australia in 1853, and thence to Cal. in 1858. He came to Idaho on the discovery of gold, and was one of the first settlers at Boise City. He was a member of the first Idaho legislature and was appointed assessor of internal revenue for the government. He died suddenly of apoplexy Nov. 7, l865, at the age of 43 years. Boise Statesman, Nov. 11, 1805. H. C. Crane, another physician of Boise City’s early days, was fatally stabbed by a nephew of the same name, in a tit of temporary insanity, in the autumn of 1868. L N. Coston, a native of Tompkins County, New York, was liberally educated and studied law. He immigrated to Idaho in 1862, and mined at Idaho City for two years, when he settled as a farmer in Boise Valley. He was elected to the legislature in 1870 and 1872 as councilman from Ada County, and was president of that body in the latter year. He was again elected in 1876. He was a good representative. Silver City Avalanche, Dec. 30, 1876. J. C. Henley, born in Ohio, came to Idaho in 1862 from Iowa, and settled at Idaho City in 1863. On the organization of the judicial system of the territory he became...

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Biography of William C. Carlton

This worthy gentleman is one of the substantial citizens of Malheur County and one of the thrifty stock men and farmers of the vicinity of Rockville, his estate of two hundred and twenty acres of good land lying seven miles west from that place. Mr. Carlton was born in Maine in 1834, being the son of Amos and Mary Carlton. He received his education from the County in the schools of his native state and there remained – until 1854 when he came via Panama to San Francisco, and thence to Indian valley in Sierra County, where he at once engaged in the fascinating labor of mining. In 186o we find him in Oregon, and then in Walla Walla, whence he returned to The Dalles and then visited his home in Maine. Returning again to California, he went to Los Angeles County, and thence to Boise, Idaho, where he engaged in wagon building until 1882, at which time he located his present home place as a homestead. Mr. Carlton has devoted his time and energies to raising stock, cattle and horses, and to general farming, from that time until the present, having achieved a good success in these endeavors. In addition to these labors, Mr. Carlton has also operated a blacksmith shop, gaining a good trade from the surrounding neighborhood. He has the prospects of a line coal mine...

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Biography of Andrew McGregor

This doughty end intrepid frontiersman, now one of the leading farmers and stock men of his vicinity, having a tine estate eight miles west from Ontario, which is the family home, and being a man of prominence and capabilities, has accomplished much in the development of the County and we are pleased to accord to him a representation in the history of Malheur County. Mr. McGregor was born in Glasgow, Scotland on June 28, 1845, being the son of Duncan and Marguerette (McIntyre) McGregor. The father was born in Inverness, north Scotland, on February 14, 1800 and the mother was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on August 27, 1865. In 1846 the family came to America in a sailing vessel, being six weeks on the trip. Landing in New York, they made their way to Boston, where the father worked at block printing and dyeing in a calico factory. In 1849 marks the date when they came to the vicinity of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and there on August 14, 1862, he enlisted in Company K, Twentieth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, being mustered in at Camp Randall, Madison, Wisconsin, and went thence to the barracks at St. Louis, and served under General Schofield in the First Brigade, Second Division, Army of the Frontier. He participated in the battle of Prairie Grove; Arkansas, December 7, 1862, was in the third siege of Vicksburg in...

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Biography of William Morfitt

To this worthy veteran of many a struggle with the savages on the frontier, as well as in many of the battles of life in the wild country, being a pioneer of the state of Oregon, and having led a life of activity in the forefront of the progress of civilization, having done well his part in all this good work, we are pleased to grant a consideration in this volume of Malheur County’s history, both because of this prominent part that he has taken in the County and in its leading industries and developments, as well as for his worth as a man and citizen. Mr. Morfitt was born in Yorkshire, England, on April 17, 1838, being the son of James and Susana Morfitt. In 1842 the father brought his family to the United States, landing in New York and thence to the site of Chicago, where he located the first foundry of that now famous city. In 1847 he came with his family across the plains to Oregon. Enroute they were attacked by the Indians several times once on the Rogue River, where four savages were killed but no loss of life among the immigrants. Before that, in the Modoc Country, they lost half of their cattle by the red-skins. At the mouth of The Yamhill River the livestock was left and the father came to Oregon...

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Biographical Sketch of James T. Davis

One of the worthy pioneers of this County, a man of ability and executive force and unswerving integrity, the subject of this sketch is now one of the leading citizens of Nyssa, and a prominent man in Malheur County. He lives one mile northwest from the town of Nyssa, having a ‘farm of one hundred and twenty acres, well improved and handled in a skillful manner, which is a good dividend producer. James T. was born in Unionville, Putnam County, Missouri, on October 25, 185o, being the son of Hamilton and Saline Davis. In 1862, the father and the oldest son came across the plains with ox teams and in 1865, our subject and his mother came the same journey with horse teams. They both made the trip without serious accident and when the mother arrived in Boise, the father was there to meet them and the reunited family made their way to the Willamette valley where they settled in Polk County. Four years later, they removed from that place to Umatilla County and in 1874, our subject went from the home in that County to Boise valley, Idaho, and later re-turned to his people, who had in the meantime migrated to Baker City. The reports which he brought from the Boise valley caused all to move there and engage in raising stock. Our subject went thence to Emmett,...

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Biography of Richard S. Rutherford

As a man among men, possessed of integrity, ability and perseverance; as a soldier, whose steady and constant service in the struggle for the punishment of treason and the wiping out of the insult to the stars and stripes was valiant and brave; as a business operator, whose wisdom and enterprise have been well manifested: the subject of this sketch stands, and it is fitting that a representation of him be granted space in this volume of Malheur’s history. Richard S. was born in Armagh county, near Bellfast, Ireland, on February 22, 1840, being the son of Thomas and Amelia (Parks) Rutherford, who emigrated to this country when this son was eighteen months old. They settled in Quebec, Canada, whence in 1848 they came to Niagara county, New York. In 1852 they removed to Tuscola county, Michigan, and few years later our subject started in life for himself, his first move was to Scott county, Missouri, where he lived until the breaking out of the Civil War. At that particular time he was in charge of a plantation. On the tenth day of August, 186l, he offered his services to fight the battles of the nation, enlisting in Company H, Eighth Missouri Volunteer Infantry, being in the Fifteenth Army Corps under General Logan and in Sherman’s Division. He went in as a private and helped with good will to...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles D. Davis

This worthy pioneer and capable citizen of Malheur County is one of the well known farmers of the vicinity of Ontario, having a farm of eighty acres two and one-half miles northwest from Ontario which is well improved with comfortable buildings, orchards, etc., having also a good supply of water for irrigating. Mr. Davis is a native of Douglas County, Nebraska, being born on November 23, 1855, and the son of Charles B. and Jane (Platt) Davis. The father was a veteran of the Mexican war, participating in many battles and skirmishes and, being honorably discharged at its close. He was a native of Ohio, but went into the war from Iowa. Following his discharge, he removed with his family to Nebraska and settled in Douglas County. In 1861 he again pressed to the front and served his country, enlisting for a three-years’ period. In 1864 the elder Davis came across the plains with his family, locating in Boise first, when few people were there and bacon cost fifty cents per pound. In 1868 he removed to the vicinity of Malheur City and being a lawyer, he practiced there and in Baker and Eldorado. In Baker City he was called hence by death, in 1875. In 1873 our subject removed to Lower Willow creek and engaged in the stock business. In the spring of 188o he came to the...

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Biography of Henry Louis Dausman A.M., Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Henry Louis Dausman, a physician and surgeon of St. Louis, his native city, was born January 18, 1855. His father, the late Henry Dausman, was a native of Germany but was brought by his parents to America when only two years of age, the family home being established on a farm near Evansville, Indiana. There Henry Dausman was reared, pursuing his education in nearby schools and after reaching a working age learned the tobacco business, thoroughly acquainting himself with that task. In 1850 he became associated in tobacco manufacturing in connection with John E. Liggett under the firm style of Liggett & Dausman. This connection was maintained until 1873, when the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Dausman became a partner of John T. Drummond, organizing the Dausman & Drummond Tobacco Company. This partnership was continued for a number of years, at the end of which time the business was sold to the tobacco trust. At the time of the sale the firm was among the largest conducting business independently in the United States. The death of Henry Dausman occurred in St. Louis in 1891, when he had reached the age of seventy-seven years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Nancy Jones, was a native of Virginia and a representative of one of the old families of that state of English lineage. Her grandfather was an officer...

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Biography of Hon. Zenas Ferry Moody

HON. Z.F. MOODY. – Zenas Ferry Moody, ex-Governor of the State of Oregon, was born on the 27th of May, 1832, in Granby, Massachusetts. His father was Major Thomas H. Moody. His mother was Hannah M. Ferry, an aunt of ex-Senator T.W. Ferry, of Michigan, formerly vice-president of the United States. Governor Moody comes of good old New England Revolutionary stock, his grandfather, Gideon Moody, having borne arms as a soldier during the Revolutionary war. He has proved himself worthy of his lineage; and the principles which he imbibed on New England soil have been the guide of his whole subsequent life. The sturdy virtues of that stock are too well known to require comment; they have become historical. The public men of New England have led the van in every reform, and have taken a most prominent part in molding all of that history of which the American people are most proud. New England ideas have been infused throughout the whole of our national life; and we have come to expect from men of New England ancestry those sturdy qualities which have contributed so largely to our happiness and prosperity as a people. Mr. Moody’s childhood was spent in Granby. January, 1848, he removed to Chicopee, Massachusetts, where he remained the ensuing three years. On the 14th of March, 1851, he sailed from New York to Oregon by...

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Biography of Benjamin and Hosea Eastman

Tales of heroism have been the theme of song and story throughout all ages. He who has gone forth to battle for his country, his home or his principles, has figured in history, in literature and in music, and his bravery has stirred the souls of men through all times. All honor to such an one, and yet his heroism is no greater or his daring more pronounced than that of the honored pioneers of the west. Men reared in comfortable homes, accustomed to all the conveniences and privileges of life in the east, have come into the wild western districts and braved danger and hardships untold. Cut off from all comforts and luxuries, they have also had to face death at the hand of the treacherous Indian, and in little bands and oft times singly they have had to fight for liberty and life. Volumes have been written, yet the story of the pioneers has never been adequately told. They deserve all praise and honor and the mighty states of the west with their splendid improvements, enterprises and tokens of civilization are monuments to their memory. The Eastman Brothers, Benjamin Manson and Hosea Bradford, are among those who have founded the state of Idaho and brought about her present prosperity and greatness. They are now numbered among the leading business men of Boise, where many important business interests...

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