Location: Boise County ID

Political Secessionism And Crime

Before the mining period, commencing in 1862, Idaho was a comparatively unknown region belonging nominally to Oregon and afterward to Washington. During the years 1862-3 such was the rush of immigration to this section that Idaho was erected into a territory of the United States government. The enabling act to organize as such was passed by congress in the spring of the latter year, and on the 22d of September William H. Wallace, late delegate to congress from Washington, who had, on July l0th preceding, been appointed governor of Idaho by President Lincoln, issued his proclamation for organizing the territory, with the capital at Lewiston; but the fact of this proclamation was scarcely known to the miners in the wilderness, far removed from mail facilities, until the following spring. Meanwhile the laws of Washington were in force. The first occurrence of the name Idaho territory in the public records seems to have been under date of August 7, 1863, in Boise. James Judge was on that day made assessor. Previously to his election as delegate Wallace had districted the territory, for judicial purposes, as follows: First district, Nez Percé and Shoshone counties, A. C. Smith judge; second, Boise county, Samuel C. Parks judge; third, Missoula county and the country east of the Rocky mountains, Sidney Edgerton judge. Florence, Bannack City and Hellgate were appointed as the seats of federal...

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Owyhee County Its History, Towns, Industries

In 1862 the present county of Owyhee was a part of Boise County, which comprised all of the western portion of Washington Territory lying south of what was then called Idaho county, its area being nearly equal to that of Pennsylvania. When Idaho was created a territory by act of congress, March 3, 1863, Boise county became part and parcel of the territory of Idaho, and at the first session of the territorial legislature, held at Lewiston, Idaho, Owyhee County was created, December 31, 1863, out of all territory south of Snake River and west of the Rocky mountains. In 1864 Oneida County, and in 1879 Cassia County, were cut off of Owyhee County, reducing it to its present limits. Its northern boundary line is the Snake River. Cassia County on the east, state of Oregon on the west, and the state of Nevada forms its southern boundary. Its area is 8,130 square miles, being somewhat larger than the state of Massachusetts. Its name, “Owyhee,” is believed to have been borrowed from the Hawaiian language, and to have been given to the Owyhee River by two Kanakas in the employ of the Hudson’s Bay Company. Prior to the spring of 1863, Owyhee County was an unexplored country, inhabited only by bands of hostile Indians, while at that time the diggings of Boise basin and Oro Fino boasted of a...

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Washington County Its Towns, Resources, Etc.

Washington County lies on the western border of the state of Idaho, and about five hundred miles from the Pacific coast. It contains a large area of land suited to various purposes. It has a population of over five thousand people. Its inhabitants are, generally speaking, enterprising and thrifty people, many of them having settled here in the early 6o”s and have remained ever since. The early settler devoted himself to stock-raising and placer-mining, and he thought that was all the county was fit for. But as the county began settling up it was soon found that anything which grew in a temperate climate would grow here. Washington County is now considered to be a kingdom within itself, as it produces everything necessary for comfort and happiness. Its resources are so varied that it would be impossible to mention all of them in this connection. Agriculture and kindred industries are pursued more at present than anything else. This in the past has been confined largely to the raising of wheat and hay. But of late years our farmers have been planting large orchards and diversifying their products generally. Anywhere in the valleys all kind of grain, fruits and cereals can be successfully grown. Wherever Washington county fruit is exhibited it always carries away a premium. At a recent state fair held in Boise, Washington County carried off more premiums...

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Discovery Of Gold in Idaho

It is reported that gold was discovered by a French Canadian in Pend d’Oreille river, in 1852. Two years later General Lander found gold while exploring the route for a military road from the Columbia to Fort Bridger. The earliest discoveries of which we have any authentic record, however, were probably made by members of the party with that veteran pioneer and path-finder, Captain John Mullan, the originator of the now famous Mullan road from Fort Benton to Walla Walla, a distance of six hundred and twenty-four miles. In a letter dated Washington, D. C, June 4, 1884, to Mr. A. F. Parker, of Eagle City, he says: I am not at all surprised at the discovery of numerous rich gold deposits in your mountains, because both on the waters of the St. Joseph and the Coeur d’Alene, when there many years ago, I frequently noticed vast masses of quartz strewing the ground, particularly on the St. Joseph river, and wide veins of quartz projecting at numerous points along the line of my road along the Coeur d’Alene, all of which indicated the presence of gold. Nay, more: I now recall quite vividly the fact that one of my herders and hunters, a man by the name of Moise, coming into camp one day with a handful of coarse gold, which he said he found on the waters of...

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Early Settlers of Boise and Boise Valley, Idaho

Calvin F. Bodfish, one of the pioneers of Ada County, was a native of Maine, whence he went to Australia in 1853, and thence to Cal. in 1858. He came to Idaho on the discovery of gold, and was one of the first settlers at Boise City. He was a member of the first Idaho legislature and was appointed assessor of internal revenue for the government. He died suddenly of apoplexy Nov. 7, l865, at the age of 43 years. Boise Statesman, Nov. 11, 1805. H. C. Crane, another physician of Boise City’s early days, was fatally stabbed by a nephew of the same name, in a tit of temporary insanity, in the autumn of 1868. L N. Coston, a native of Tompkins County, New York, was liberally educated and studied law. He immigrated to Idaho in 1862, and mined at Idaho City for two years, when he settled as a farmer in Boise Valley. He was elected to the legislature in 1870 and 1872 as councilman from Ada County, and was president of that body in the latter year. He was again elected in 1876. He was a good representative. Silver City Avalanche, Dec. 30, 1876. J. C. Henley, born in Ohio, came to Idaho in 1862 from Iowa, and settled at Idaho City in 1863. On the organization of the judicial system of the territory he became...

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Biographical Sketch of Joseph C. Kelley

Joseph C. Kelley, one of the young business men of Malheur county, was born January 3, 1870, at Idaho City, Idaho, his parents being Joseph and Marrgaret (Thompson) Kelley, pioneers of that state. Joseph Kelley, senior, was a native of Farmington, Iowa, and was among those who in the early fifties sought the golden sands of California. After spending several years in California, in the middle sixties, Mr. Kelley again emigrated, going to Idaho and establishing himself in business as a mechanic at Idaho City. Here, in the closing days of 1870, the silver cord was broken and all that was earthly of the departed pioneer was laid at rest. A little while later the family removed to Oregon, settling near Nyssa, in this county, and in 1877, Mr. Kelley having meanwhile become the wife W. K.. Stark, the family again chose a new home, this time on Willow creek, where the subject of this sketch grew to manhood’s estate. The mother passed into the life beyond in August, 1817. Of the immediate family now living there are but two, Joseph and his brother, Melville D. Kelley. a prosperous ranch man residing on Willow creek. Mr. Kelley remained at home, engaged in ranching and stock raising, until 1898 when, having learned the saddler’s trade, he came to Vale and opened a small harness and saddle store. From a small...

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Biography of Charles A. Schnabel

Thirty-seven years have passed since Charles Augusta Schnabel came to Idaho. This state, so aptly termed “the gem of the mountains,” was then a wild district, its lands unclaimed, its resources undeveloped. A few courageous frontiersmen had dared to locate within its borders, but the work of progress and improvement remained to the future, and there was little promise of early development. In the years which have since passed Mr. Schnabel has not only witnessed a most wonderful transformation, but has largely aided in the labors which have transformed the wild tract into a splendid commonwealth. Now in his declining years he is living retired, enjoying the well-earned rest which is the merited reward of a long and honorable business career. A native of Prussia, Mr. Schnabel was born in Elberfield, October 18, 1828 and for generations his ancestors had resided in the fatherland. He acquired his education in the public schools, and in Germany learned the trade of fringe and lace weaving. When a young man of twenty years he determined to try his fortune in America, landing in New York on the day that Zachariah Taylor was elected president of the United States. He then made his way to Baltimore, Maryland, where he had a brother living, and in that city worked at his trade for a year, when, hearing of the rich gold discoveries in California,...

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Biography of John Wagener

John Wagener is one of the owners of the Trook and Jennings mine and five-stamp mill, one mile southeast of Silver City. He is also proprietor of several stock ranches and since pioneer days has been active in the development of the business resources of this state. A native of Germany, he came to America hoping to better his financial condition, and whatever success he has achieved is due entirely to his own labors. Mr. Wagener was born June 30, 1833 and in his native land acquired his education. When a young man of nineteen years he bade adieu to home and friends and in 1852 sailed for America, coming to this country in limited circumstances and without any knowledge of the language, manners or customs of the people. It is astonishing how rapidly our foreign-born citizens adapt themselves to new surroundings and be-come an integral part in our public life. Mr. Wagener took up his residence in New York City and began learning the wagon maker’s trade, at which he worked for a number of years. He then left the Atlantic for the Pacific coast, and in 1858 visited Idaho, when it was still a part of Washington Territory. He crossed the plains to Vancouver’s, thence came to Florence in 1862, and after engaging in placer-mining at the latter place for a year, went to Idaho City in...

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Biography of Thomas T. Redsull

Great, indeed, have been the changes that time and man have wrought since Thomas T. Redsull landed on the Pacific coast. California yet belonged to Mexico, and much of the land, especially in the southern part of the state, was divided into large estates, owned and occupied by Spanish families. Mr. Redsull was then but eleven years of age, yet had started out to make his own way in the world. He was born in the County of Kent, England, on the 15th of November, 1827, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Goymer) Redsull, both of whom were natives of England and representatives of ancient families of that country. They were both members of the Episcopal Church, and the father was a collector of excise for the government. He departed this life in 1858, at the age of fifty years, and his widow is now living at the age of one hundred and three years. They had seven children, but only three are now living. Mr. Redsull of this review acquired his early education in England, and when only eleven years of age was bound out as an apprentice to the Hudson’s Bay Company, and in their service came to the United States in 1838, landing in California. He is consequently one of the oldest pioneers of that state. The same year he also went to Oregon, and therefore...

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Biography of James P. Gray

Thirty-five years have passed since James P. Gray came to Idaho to cast in his lot with its pioneers. People of the present end-of-the-century period can scarcely realize the struggles and dangers which attended the early settlers, the heroism and self-sacrifice of lives passed upon the borders of civilization, the hardships endured, the difficulties overcome. These tales of the early days read almost like a romance to those who have known only the modern prosperity and conveniences. To the pioneer of the early days, far removed from the privileges and conveniences of city or town, the struggle for existence was a stern and hard one, and these men and women must have possessed indomitable energies and sterling worth of character, as well as marked physical courage, when they thus voluntarily selected such a life and successfully fought its battles under such circumstances as prevailed in the northwest. James P. Gray was a young man of eighteen years when he took up his residence in the mining camp at Idaho City. His early life was spent in Illinois, his birth having occurred in Peoria County, that state, December 10, 1846. He is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and his grandfather, William Gray, emigrated from the north of Ireland with his wife, taking up his residence in Indiana, where occurred the birth of Thomas Gray, the father of our subject. In the Hoosier...

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Biography of James H. Hawley

No Compendium such as the province of this work defines in its essential limitations will serve to offer fit memorial to the life and accomplishments of the honored subject of this sketch a man remarkable in the breadth of his wisdom, in his indomitable perseverance, his strong individuality, and yet one whose entire life has not one esoteric phase, being an open scroll, inviting the closest scrutiny. True, his have been “massive deeds and great” in one sense, and yet his entire life accomplishment but represents the result of the fit utilization of the innate talent which is his, and the directing of his efforts in those lines where mature judgment and rare discrimination lead the way. There is in Mr. Hawley a weight of character, a native sagacity, a far-seeing judgment and a fidelity of purpose that commands the respect of all. A man of indefatigable enterprise and fertility of resource, he has carved his name deeply on the record of the political, commercial and professional history of the state, which owes much of its advancement to his efforts. James H. Hawley was born in Dubuque, Iowa, on the 17th of January 1847, and in his veins mingles the blood of English, Dutch and Irish ancestors. The Hawley family was founded in America in 1760. William Carr, the maternal great-grandfather of our subject, was a major in the...

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Biography of John Brodbeck

One of the representative businessmen of Boise, Mr. Brodbeck, is a pioneer of Idaho, having come to this state in 1865. He is a native of Switzerland, where he was born April 4, 1833, and was reared and educated in his native land and there learned the brewing business. His parents were Nicholas and Elizabeth (Hagler) Brodbeck, the former of whom was a miller by trade, and he and his wife were members of the Lutheran church and were people of high respectability in the old country. He died in his fifty-third year and his wife survived him until attaining the advanced age of eighty-five years. They had five sons and two daughters, one of the latter and our subject being the only ones now living. After leaving school Mr. Brodbeck entered a commercial house, remaining there four years and then became connected with a brewing house. Subsequently he came to America, landing at New York, whence he journeyed to California in 1857 and settled at Scott Valley, where he had a brother living near Fort Jones. General Crook was then a second lieutenant at the fort and Mr. Brodbeck became intimately acquainted with him. Our subject was engaged in farming for a few years, but hearing of the silver discoveries in Nevada he sold out and went to that state, where he remained a year and then decided...

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Biography of James Wilson

James Wilson, deceased, was for many years one of the leading farmers and stockmen of Idaho, and during his residence in this state did as much as any other man in the commonwealth in the interests of agriculture and stock raising. He is properly classed among the pioneers of Idaho, for his residence dated from 1864, and from that time until his death he took an active part in the conduct of business interests that resulted to the benefit of the state, as well as to his individual prosperity. A native of Washington County, Indiana, he was born May 15, 1826, his parents being Jesse and Sarah (McCoy) Wilson. The father was born near Morgantown, Virginia, May 17, 1800, and removed to Washington County, Indiana, during the pioneer period in the history of that state. His death occurred in Grande Ronde valley, Oregon, in the fall of 1863, but his wife, who was likewise a native of the Old Dominion, died in Washington County, Indiana, in 1828. When seven years of age James Wilson removed from his native County to Vigo County, Indiana, where he resided until 1854, when he took up his abode in Wayne County, Iowa, making his home there until the spring of 1862. At that date he crossed the great plains and located in Oregon, whence he came to Idaho in March, 1864, locating in...

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Biography of Thomas Davis

The founders of a state are not merely the men who handle the reins of government and control the public policy, but are also those who carry civilization into hitherto wild regions and develop the natural resources of the state: Such an one is Mr. Davis, who came to Idaho in pioneer days and was the first to establish the fact that this is an excellent fruit-producing region. Thus he introduced a new industry and thereby largely promoted the material welfare of the region. His business interests have ever been energetically and successfully managed and his reputation in commercial circles is above reproach. Mr. Davis is a native of Ohio, his birth having occurred in Cincinnati, on the 2d of January 1838. His father died during the early childhood of the son, who was then bound out until he had attained his majority. He was sent to the district school during the winter season, while during the summer months he labored early and late in the cultivation of the fields. When a young man of twenty-three years he joined a company of seventy-five men en route for the west. He drove his own team of mules and was accompanied by his brother Francis, who has since died. They were persuaded by some Mormons to travel by way of the Sublette cut-off. Fort Lemhi was then occupied by Mormons. At...

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Biography of James I. Crutcher

One to whom has been entrusted important public service and over whose record there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil, is James I. Crutcher, of Boise. President Cleveland recognized his eminent qualifications for responsible duties when he appointed him United States marshal for Idaho, in which position he served for four years and two months, in a manner above suspicion. His unbending integrity of character, his fearlessness in the discharge of duty and his appreciation of the responsibilities that rested upon him were such as to make him a most acceptable incumbent of that office, and his worth then, as now, was widely acknowledged. A native of Kentucky, Mr. Crutcher was born in Shelby County, on the 31st of December 1835. His ancestors were early settlers of Virginia and North Carolina, and members of the family became pioneers in the development of Kentucky. It was in that state that Thomas M. Crutcher, father of our subject, was born, his natal clay being in 1810. He wedded Miss Mary Ann Edwards, a native of Woodford County, Kentucky, who also belonged to a family of equally early settlement in the south. Her father was James Edwards, a pioneer widely and favorably known in Kentucky. Thomas M. Crutcher was an enterprising farmer, and through the capable management of his agricultural interests won a comfortable competence. He held membership in...

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