Location: Bertie County NC

Act of October 15, 1748

Concerning the land allotted to the Tuscarora in Birtie they have leased it several times; and I have selected a few of the laws of North Carolina that are now in force, concerning the Tuscarora in that state, namely: Gabriel Johnson, Esq., Governor. At a general assembly held at New Bern, the fifteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and forty-eight. An Act for ascertaining the bounds of a certain tract of land formerly laid out by treaty to the use of the Tuscarora Indians, so long as they, or any of them, shall occupy and live upon the same, and to prevent any person or persons taking up lands, or settling within the said bounds, by pretense of any purchase or purchases made, or that shall be made, from the said Indians. Article I. Whereas, complaints are made by the Tuscarora Indians, of divers encroachments made by the English on their lands, and it being but just that the ancient inhabitants of this Province shall have and enjoy a quiet and convenient dwelling place in this their native country, wherefore,” Bounds of the Indians’ lands confirmed . Article II. We pray that it may be enacted, and be it enacted by His Excellency Gabriel Johnson, Esquire, Governor, by and with the advice and consent of his majesty’s council, and general assembly...

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Bertie County, North Carolina – Wills 1761-1799

A. 1762 ANDREWS, ABNER, Wife (not named), Margaret, Stephen and John. 1762 AZWELL, THOMAS, Ann Gibbons (mother), Ann Virgin (sister). 1771 ASKEW AARON, Martha (wife), Jesse, Moses, Martha, Sarah, Pheraba and Ann. 1771 AVERETT, HENRY, Martha (wife), Julia and Martha. 1771 ABINGDON, JAMES, wife (not named), James, Hardiman, Martha, Elizabeth, William, Thomas, Henry, Littleberry, Sarah and Lydia. 1772 AVERETT, HENRY, Jesse and Charles; and the children of Henry (son). 1781 ASIIRORN, THOMAS, Elizabeth, Benjamin, Thomas, William and Elisha. 1781 AVERITT, SIMON, Thomas, William and James. 1790 AVIS, SAWYER, Joseph. 1790 ASHLEY, THOMAS, Harrell, Amos. 1791 ARMISTEAD, WILLIAM, Sarah, Jordan, Starkey, John, William, Robert, Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary and Priscilla. 1797 ALLEN, JOHN, Ann (wife), John B., James B., Sarah B.; Hunter, Mildred. 1799 AVERETT, JESSE, Mary and Jesse. 1799 ALEXANDER, JOHN, Martha and Rachel. B. 1762 BROWN, JENNY, Arthur, Mary, Elizabeth, Sarah and Priscilla. 1762 BRYON, EDWARD, Thomas, Martha (wife), Margaret, Sarah, Martha, Elizabeth, Ann, Janet, Sarah. 1762 BARBERREE, ABRAHAM, Isaac, Mary (wife). 1762 BARRADAILE, JOSEPH, Abraham, John and Mary (wife). 1762 BUTTERTON, JOSEPH, Robert, Joseph, John, James and Elizabeth; wife (not named). 1762 BROGDON, DAVID, Mary, John, Susanna and Fred. 1762 BASS, THOMAS, John, Jacob, Mary, Isabel and Thomasine (wife). 1762 BAILES, EDEN, Rebecca (wife), John. 1762 BOND, THOMAS, Thomas. 1770 BRYAN, NEEDHAM, Sarah (wife), William, Needham and Rachel. 1770 BARFIELD, THOMAS, Courtney (wife), Thomas, Mary and Elizabeth. 1771...

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Saponi Indians

Saponi Tribe: Evidently a corruption of Monasiccapano or Monasukapanough, which, as shown by Bushnell, is probably derived in part from a native term “moni seep” signifying “shallow water.” Paanese is a corruption and in no way connected with the word “Pawnee.” Saponi Connections. The Saponi belonged to the Siouan linguistic family, their nearest relations being the Tutelo. Saponi Location. The earliest known location of the Saponi has been identified by Bushnell (1930) with high probability with “an extensive village site on the banks of the Rivanna, in Albemarle County, directly north of the University of Virginia and about one-half mile up the river from the bridge of the Southern Railway.” This was their location when, if ever, they formed a part of the Monacan Confederacy. (See also North Carolina, New York, and Pennsylvania.) Saponi Villages. The principal Saponi settlement usually bore the same name as the tribe or, at least, it has survived to us under that name. In 1670 Lederer reports another which he visited called Pintahae, situated not far from the main Saponi town after it had been removed to Otter Creek, southwest of the present Lynchburg (Lederer, 1912), but this was probably the Nahyssan town. Saponi History As first pointed out by Mooney (1895), the Saponi tribe is identical with the Monasukapanough which appears on Smith’s map as though it were a town of the Monacan...

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Chowanoc Indians

Chowanoc Tribe: Meaning in Algonquian “(people) at the south.” Chowanoc Connections. The Chowanoc belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and were evidently most nearly allied to the other North Carolina Algonquians. Chowanoc Location. On Chowan River about the junction of Meherrin and Blackwater Rivers. Chowanoc Villages Catoking, (probably) near Gatesville, in Gates County. Maraton, on the east bank of Chowan River in Chowan County. Metocaum, on Chowan River in the present Bertie County. Ohanoak, on the west side of Chowan River not far below Nottoway River probably in Hertford County. Ramushonok, apparently between the Meherrin and Nottoway Rivers in Hertford County. Chowanoc History. In 1584-85, when first known to Europeans, the Chowanoc were the leading tribe in northeastern North Carolina. In 1663 they entered into a treaty with the English by which they submitted to the English Crown, but they violated this in 1675 and after a year of warfare were compelled to confine themselves to a reservation on Bennett’s Creek which became reduced by 1707 from 12 square miles to 6. They sided with the colonists in the Tuscarora War, and at about the same time were visited by a Church of England missionary, Giles Rainsford. In 1723 a reservation of 53,000 acres was set aside for them conjointly with the Tuscarora and in 1733 they were given permission to incorporate with that tribe. They continued to decline...

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William M. Sutton, Jr.

Private, Pioneer Inf., 57th Regt. Born in Bertie County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. M. Sutton. Entered the service Aug. 5, 1918, at Windsor, N.C. Was sent to Camp Wadsworth, S. C., Aug. 6th. Sailed for France. Was in Officers’ Training Camp at Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., for two months. Flying cadet in aviation two months. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., May 1,...

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J. V. Roane

Private, 117th Inf., 30th Div., Co. L. Born in Bertie County Aug. 16, 1894; son of Mr. and Mrs. Junius Roane. Entered service March 29, 1918, at Kelford, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and from there to Camp Sevier, S. C. Sailed for France July 3, 1918. Fought on the Hindenburg Line, Bellicourt, Ypres, and in all engagements of 117th Regt. Arrived in the United States March 1, 1919. Landed at Charleston, S. C. Mustered out at Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., April 16,...

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Thomas N. Peele

1st Sergt., Engineers, Co. B. Born in Bertie County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jackson Peele. Entered the service May 27, 1917, at Lewiston, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and sailed for France Sept. 14, 1918. Promoted to rank of first Sergt. February, 1919. Arrived in USA July 4, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., July 14,...

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S. J. Fore

Regt., Supply Sergt., Inf., Co. Supply, 81st Div., 321st Regt.; of Bertie County; son of John A. Fore and Mrs. Sallie A. Fore. Husband of Mrs. Ethel (Gattis) Fore. Entered service Oct. 4, 1917, at Roxobel, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. Transferred to Camp Sevier, S.C., May 21, 1918. Sailed for France Aug. 17, 1918. Promoted to rank of Regt. Supply Sergt. March, 1918. Fought at St. Die, Meuse-Argonne offensive. Arrived in USA June 20, 1919, at Newport News, Va., Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 27,...

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P. B. Davis

Private, Inf., 13th Co.; of Bertie County; son of James A. and Mrs. Elnora Davis. Entered service Aug., 1918, at Windsor, N.C. Sent to Camp Greene, N.C. Mustered out at Camp Greene, N.C., Dec.,...

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B. L. Cloniger

Cook, M. G., Born in Bertie County; son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Cobb. Entered the service June 22, 1918, at Windsor, N.C. Was sent to Camp Hancock, Ga. Promoted to Cook June 25, 1918, and to Mess Sergt. August, 1918. Mustered out at Camp Hancock, Ga., Dec. 27,...

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E. G. Cherry

Private 1st Class, Anti-Aircraft Bty., C. A. C., 7th Reg.; of Bertie County; son of Sol and Mrs. E. W. Cherry. Husband of Mrs. Annie May Sutton Cherry. Entered service May 5, 1917, at Windsor, N.C. Sent to Ft. Caswell, N.C. Sailed for France June 19, 1918. Promoted to Private 1st Class July, 1918. Fought at St. Mihiel, Argonne, Toul Sector, Verdun. Landed in USA March 7, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., March 25,...

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Sol Cherry

Corpl., Arty., 7th Baty, 10th Sector, 1st Army. Born May 20, 1892; son of Sol and Elizabeth Cherry, of Bertie County. Entered service May 4, 1917, at Windsor, N.C. Sent to Ft. Caswell, N.C., July 25, 1917. Sailed for France June 9, 1918. Promoted on Dec. 18, 1917, to Corpl. Fought at Lorraine, Toul Sector, St. Mihiel offensive and Meuse-Argonne offensive. Returned to USA March 8, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee March 24,...

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William S. Bell

Private, 1st class, Co. H, 30th Div., 120th Reg.; of Bertie County; son of Mr. N. B. and Mrs. Sarah Bell. Husband of Mrs. Cassie (Bryant) Bell. Entered service at Roxobel, N.C., June 25, 1917. Sent to Camp Sevier. Sailed for France May 27, 1918. Promoted to 1st class Private Aug. 25, 1917. Fought in Hindenburg Drive. Wounded in Hindenburg Drive Sept. 29, 1918, by shrapnel. Arrived in USA April 13, 1919, at Charleston, S. C. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 18,...

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Saponi Tribe

Saponi Indians. One of the eastern Siouan tribes, formerly living in North Carolina and Virginia, but now extinct. The tribal name was occasionally applied to the whole group of Ft Christanna tribes, also occasionally included under Tutelo. That this tribe belonged to the Siouan stock has been placed beyond doubt by the investigations of Hale and Mooney. Their language appears to have been the same as the Tutelo to the extent that the people of the two tribes could readily understand each other. Mooney has shown that the few Saponi words recorded are Siouan. Lederer mentions a war in which the Saponi seem to have been engaged with the Virginia settlers as early as 1654-56, the time of the attack by the Cherokee, probably in alliance with them. The first positive notice is by Lederer (1670), who informs us that he stopped a few days at Sapon, a town of the Tutelo confederacy, situated on a tributary of the upper Roanoke. This village was apparently on Otter river, southwest of Lynchburg, Virginia. Pintahae is mentioned also as another of their villages near by. It is evident that the Saponi and Tutelo were living at that time in close and apparently confederated relation. In 1671 they were visited by Thomas Batts and others accompanied by two Indian guides. After traveling nearly due west from the mouth of the Appomattox about...

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