Location: Berry County MO

Biography of M. H. Osburn, M. D.

M. H. OSBURN, M. D. There are always in the medical profession some individuals who become eminent and command a large patronage, and among those who deserve special recognition is Dr. M. H. Osburn, whose face is a familiar one in the home of the sick and afflicted. He has practiced his profession in his section of Missouri for twenty years and his name has become almost a household word. He is a Georgian by birth, born March 27, 1838 a son of Ectyl and Cynthia (Nelson) Osburn, who were born in the Palmetto State and Georgia, respectively. The paternal grandfather, William Osburn, was born in South Carolina also, was of English-Irish descent, and throughout life followed the occupation of farming, to which occupation he reared his son, Ectyl. The latter, with his wife, emigrated to Missouri in 1867 and settled on a farm three miles from Rome, but eventually died in Ozark County, Missouri, in 1886. He was a minister of the Missionary Baptist Church for a number of years, and during the great Civil War was a member of a Tennessee regiment. His wife, who was a daughter of Wiley Nelson, died in 1883, after having borne him ten children, the following of whom are living: Dr. M. H.,G. W.,J.H.E., Howell C., Mariah, Frances and Mary A. Those deceased are William N., Sarah J. and Cynthia C....

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Biography of George W. Osburn, M. D.

GEORGE W. OSBURN, M. D. The life of the popular, successful physician is one of incessant toil, self-denial and care, yet all true followers of the “healing art” strive to attain prominence in their profession, regardless of added burdens which will rest upon their shoulders. Such a man is George W. Osburn, who was born in Gwinnett County, Ga., November 15, 1841, a son of Ectyl and Cynthia (Nelson) Osburn (see sketch of Dr. M. H. Osburn). George W. attended the common schools of Georgia, was brought up to the healthy and useful life of the farmer, and when the great Civil War came up was forced into the Confederate service, but shortly after managed to make his escape and refugeed to Ohio, making his home in Cincinnati from 1863 to 1864, when he went to Chicago, later to the city of New York, and then back again to Chicago, where he made his home until 1868. He was engaged in carpentering and helped to build many of the early houses of that city. In 1868 he became a resident of Berry County, Missouri, but two years later located at Thornfield, in Ozark County, and in 1871 on the farm where he now lives in Douglas County, ten miles south of Ava. His farm consists of 690 acres, and he has now 200 acres under cultivation, although but small...

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Biography of Judge James P. Ince

JUDGE JAMES P. INCE. This gentleman is the associate judge of the Western District of Douglas County, Missouri, and no better man for the position could be found than he, for he is intelligent, well posted, imbued with the milk of human kindness, and has always shown the utmost impartiality in his decisions. The Judge has resided in Missouri since 1843, and has been a resident of Douglas County since 1862, taking up his abode in the vicinity of Rome. He was born in Overton County, Tennessee, March 28, 1828, a son of John and Elizabeth (Clark) Ince, the former of whom was born in Ireland and came to the United States in his youth, locating in South Carolina, where he lived for about five years. He then spent eight years in Overton County, Tennessee, after which he became a resident of Lawrence County, Arkansas, and there was called from life about 1833. After his death his widow returned to Tennessee, and in 1843 came to Missouri and settled in Greene County, about twenty miles south of Springfield, where she resided until 1863, when she moved to Pike County, and died in 1887. She was a native of the Old North State and a daughter of John Clark, who lived and died in that State, a farmer. The subject of this sketch was one of eight children: Thomas, Jesse,...

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Biography of Jesse P. Briscoe

JESSE P. BRISCOE. The time has never been that the prescription drug gist was not of as great importance to a community as the physician. Indeed it would be difficult to name a branch of business that is more indispensably important than that devoted to the sale and importation of drugs and the preparation of prescriptions. Neither is there any line of business demanding more ability and scientific knowledge. One of the eminent prescription druggists of Harrison, Arkansas, is Jesse P. Briscoe, who is a gentleman of bright talent and enterprise. He was born in Benton County, Arkansas, May 15, 1856, the fifth of twelve children born to James and Martha (King) Briscoe, the former of whom was born in Tennessee, and with his father, John Briscoe, became a resident of Springfield, Greene County, Missouri, the latter’s death occurring in that county. James Briscoe attained manhood in Greene County, and when still young removed to Berry County, Missouri, and later to Benton County, Arkansas, being a resident of the latter place when the war came up. In 1864 he returned to Berry County, Missouri, and was there living at the time of his death, which occurred in 1886, when sixty years of age. His wife, who was a native of Tennessee, died in 1879, a daughter of Jesse King. She bore her husband the following children: Jane who is...

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Biography of J. R. Wade

J. R. Wade, a leading agriculturist of Osage county, exemplifies in his career the progressive spirit that has been the dominant factor in the up building of the west and is a typical frontiersman, having spent much of his life on the wide, open ranges and gained that breadth of vision and keen insight which come through close communion with nature. He was born in the southeastern part of Berry county, Missouri, September 3, 1883, and his parents were E. B. and E. J. (Bradley) Wade, the former a native of Virginia, while the latter way born in Missouri. The father was an honored veteran of the Civil war, enlisting at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, where he received his discharge from the service. He came to Oklahoma when it was first opened up for settlement and entered a claim from the government, but times were so hard that he was forced to abandon the property after living on it for three months. From there he went to the northeastern part of Osage county, where he resided until his death, which occurred in October, 1892. The mother is now living in Chautauqua, Kansas, and has reached the age of sixty-eight years. A brother and a sister of the subject of this review, Walter and Bertha Wade, are deceased, both passing away in the house in which the father’s demise occurred. The...

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