Location: Belleville New York

Frances Pamela Todd Moffett of Watertown NY

MOFFETT, Frances Pamela Todd8, (Enoch L.7, Daniel6, Daniel5, Daniel4, Daniel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Jan. 9, 1843, in East Rodman, N. Y., died after a brief illness in New York City, Jan. 26, 1909, and was buried in the family burial lot in Brookside Cemetery, Watertown, N. Y. She married Jan. 28, 1862, John Fletcher Moffett, of Rodman, N. Y. After their marriage, they went to Watertown, N. Y., to live, where he was employed in the National Bank and Trust Company. Nearly all their subsequent life was passed there, and practically in the same house, which stood where the Asbury Methodist Church now stands, of which society they both were members. Mrs. Moffett’s beauty of character, as well as grace, endeared her to all who knew her. She was always active in charitable and philantrophic work of all kinds, yet notwithstanding all these activities, her home life was her chief and dearest care and her children “rise up and call her blessed.” She was educated in the district school and in 1856, she attended the Black River Institute in Watertown, N. Y., in 1857, she went to the Belleville Academy in Belleville, N. Y., which she attended for two years. Children: I. Charles Todd, b. July 29, 1864. II. Jeannette Todd, b. Sept. 28, 1868. III. Grace Emily, b. April 13, 1872, m. Louis S. Lansing; in 1917, they...

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Biography of William Fisk Eastman

William Fiske Eastman, co-editor with P. S. McGlynn, of the Moline Daily Dispatch and Weekly Review-Dispatch, and postmaster of Moline, was born in Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, November 11, 1844. His parents were Charles W. Eastman, Doctor of Medicine, and Cynthia (Fiske) Eastman. He attended the public schools of his native village and Union Academy in the neighboring village of Belleville. Graduating there he attended Union College at Schenectady, New York, graduating in the scientific course in 1866, and taking first honors of that course. In the meantime he had been teaching in the district schools, earning in this way and by conducting a book store in his room at college, the money that paid for his college course. After graduating he came West and taught in the schools of Maquoketa, Iowa, and Sterling and Union Grove, Illinois, expecting to devote his life to that work. In 1872 his health broke down and he sought other business. He purchased the Red Oak (Iowa) Express and conducted it a few months when there came a proposition which he accepted, to go back to Sterling and purchase a half interest in the Sterling Gazette. He held his half interest in this for nearly ten years when he sold it because his health again broke down. He then went to Huron, South Dakota, where he engaged in banking with a partner,...

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