Location: Barren County KY

Barren County Kentucky Family Bible Records

Barren County, Kentucky Family Bible Records (Hosted at Barren County USGenWeb Archives Project ) Andrews Family Bible Berry Family Bible Berry-Harrison Family Bible Bewley-Bailey Family Bible Bybee Family Bible Cockrill-Payne Family Bible Cox Family Bible Curd-Snoddy Family Bible Crenshaw Family Bible Davis Family Bible Denton Family Bible Denham Family Bible Depp-Grinstead Family Bible Dossey Family Bible Ellis-Curd Family Bible Glover – Dickerson Family Bible Gott 1 Family Bible Gott 2 Family Bible Hanes Family Bible Harrison-Franklin Family Bible Holman Family Bible Kerley Family Bible Kinslow 1 Family Bible Kinslow 2 Family Bible Kinslow 3 Family Bible Kinslow 4 Family Bible Marshall 1 Family Bible Marshall 2 Family Bible Moore Family Bible Murrell Family Bible Ray-Chism Family Bible Read Family Bible Redford Family Bible Richardson-Reynolds Family Bible Rush Family Bible Snoddy Family Bible Taylor Family Bible Thomerson Family Bible Totty Family Bible Wells Family Bible Williams-Kidwell Family Bible Wilson-Martin Family Bible Whitney Family...

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Biographical Sketch of George White

George White, the well known implement dealer and auctioneer of Newman, was born near Glasgow, Barren County, Kentucky, August 18, 1842, and is a son of M. L. and Mary (Biby) White. Middleton White was born in Barren County, Kentucky and moved to Edgar County, Illinois, where he was married. His wife was also from near Glasgow. Kentucky. ‘They are both dead and buried in the Paris cemetery. George White came to Newman and located in business in about 1874, since which time his business has steadily grown until he is known as one of the most successful and extensive implement dealers in the entire County. He also handles the Mitchell wagon and several makes of buggies and carriages. His sales run from $25,000 to $35,000 annually. In 1844 Mr. White was united in marriage to Miss Della Clark, who is a native of Kentucky. They have two children: Henry W., who will graduate from the Chicago Homeopathic School of Medicine in March, 1901, and Fred, who is in business with his father. George White has here held the office of township supervisor and while he resided in Edgar County held the same office. In 1861 he volunteered in Company E, Twelfth Illinois Infantry and served through the entire Civil war. During the month of February especially his services are in great demand as a public auctioneer. He is...

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Slave Narrative of John Eubanks & Family

Interviewer: Archie Koritz Person Interviewed: John Eubanks Location: Gary, Indiana Place of Birth: Barren County, Kentucky Date of Birth: June 6, 1836 Age: 98 Archie Koritz, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project Lake County-District #1 Gary, Indiana EX-SLAVES JOHN EUBANKS & FAMILY Gary, Indiana Gary’s only surviving Civil War veteran was born a slave in Barren County, Kentucky, June 6, 1836. His father was a mulatto and a free negro. His mother was a slave on the Everrett plantation and his grandparents ware full-blooded African negroes. As a child he began work as soon as possible and was put to work hoeing and picking cotton and any other odd jobs that would keep him busy. He was one of a family of several children, and is the sole survivor, a brother living in Indianapolis, having died there in 1935. Following the custom of the south, when the children of the Everrett family grew up, they married and slaves were given them for wedding presents. John was given to a daughter who married a man of the name of Eubanks, hence his name, John Eubanks. John was one of the more fortunate slaves in that his mistress and master were kind and they were in a state divided on the question of slavery. They favored the north. The rest of the children were given to other members of the Everrett family...

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Slave Narrative of John Eubanks

Interviewer: Archie Koritz Person Interviewed: John Eubanks Location: Gary, Indiana Age: 98 Place of Residence: 2713 Harrison Boulevard, Gary, Indiana Archie Koritz, Field Worker 816 Mound Street, Valparaiso, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project Lake County, District #1 Gary, Indiana EX-SLAVES INTERVIEW WITH JOHN EUBANKS, EX-SLAVE John Eubanks, Gary’s only negro Civil War survivor has lived to see the ninety-eighth anniversary of his birth and despite his advanced age, recalls with surprising clarity many interesting and sad events of his boyhood days when a slave on the Everett plantation. He was born in Glasgow, Barron County, Kentucky, June 6, 1839, one of seven children of a chattel of the Everett family. The old man retains most of his faculties, but bears the mark of his extreme age in an obvious feebleness and failing sight and memory. He is physically large, says he once was a husky, weighing over two hundred pounds, bears no scars or deformities and despite the hardships and deprivations of his youth, presents a kindly and tolerant attitude. “I remembah well, us young uns on the Everett plantation,” he relates, “I worked since I can remembah, hoein’, pickin’ cotton and othah chohs ’round the fahm. We didden have much clothes, nevah no undahweah, no shoes, old ovahalls and a tattahed shirt, wintah and summah. Come de wintah, it be so cold mah feet weah plumb numb mos’ o’...

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Slave Narrative of Edd Shirley

Interviewer: Lenneth Jones Person Interviewed: Edd Shirley Location: Kentucky Age: 97 Occupation:  Janitor Monroe County. Folklore. (Lenneth Jones-242) [HW: Essay] Uncle Edd Shirley (97): Janitor at Tompkinsville Drug Co. and Hospital, Tompkinsville, Ky. [TR: Information moved from bottom of page.] Slaves: I am 97 years old and am still working as janitor and support my family. My father was a white man and my mother was a colored lady. I was owned three different times, or rather was sold to three different families. I was first owned by the Waldens; then I was sold to a man by the name of Jackson, of Glasgow, Kentucky. Then my father, of this county, bought me. I have had many slave experiences. Some slaves were treated good, and some were treated awful bad by the white people; but most of them were treated good if they would do what their master told them to do. I onced saw a light colored gal tied to the rafters of a barn, and her master whipped her until blood ran down her back and made a large pool on the ground. And I have seen negro men tied to stakes drove in the ground and whipped because they would not mind their master; but most white folks were better to their slaves and treated them better than they are now. After their work in the fields...

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Biography of William C. Morrison

WILLIAM C. MORRISON. This gentleman is the efficient collector of Ozark County, Missouri, a position he has held since 1889, and from 1887 to 1888 he discharged the duties of county assessor. He owes his nativity to the Blue Grass State, his birth occurring in Barren County, June 10, 1842, his parents, Joseph S. and Nancy J. (Low) Morrison, being also natives of that State. The paternal grandfather, Steptoe Morrison, was a native of the Palmetto State, but was an early emigrant to Barren County, Kentucky, and later to Arkansas, in which State he spent his last days. Solomon Low, the maternal grandfather, was a Virginian, and became a pioneer settler of Barren County, Kentucky Joseph S. Morrison was born in 1826 or 1827, and when the Civil War came up he enlisted in the Fifth Kentucky Cavalry, and being a skillful blacksmith, he was made chief of the blacksmith corps of his regiment. He served from July, 1861, until his death which occurred at Nashville, Tennessee, in 1863, having proved himself a brave, faithful and conscientious soldier. He was a Master Mason, was a stanch Republican in politics, and was a man of unblemished reputation. His widow died in Barren County, Kentucky, in 1886, having become the mother of eight children: William C.; Sarah E., who died at the age of fifteen years; John, who also died young;...

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Biography of Capt. C. C. Owen

CAPT. C. C. OWEN. The greater part of the life of Capt. C. C. Owen has been devoted to husbandry, but now, in the sixty-fifth year of his age, he is retired from that life, and is a notary public of Protem, Missouri. He was born in Barren County, Kentucky, in 1829, a son of George W. and Martha S. (Dickerson) Owen, natives of North Carolina and Kentucky, respectively, the birth of the former occurring in 1801 and that of the latter in 1805. George W. Owen was taken by his parents to Kentucky, and there he attained man’s estate and was married. In 1842 he came, by wagon, to Benton County, Missouri, the journey thither occupying one month. For ten years or more the father operated a tan yard in Benton County, and became a well-known man in that section. At the opening of the Civil War he enlisted in the Federal Army, but was soon rejected on account of his age. Up to the opening of the great conflict between the North and South, he was a Democrat, but he afterward became a stanch Republican. He became a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and held to that faith until his death in 1870, his widow surviving him until 1886. His father, John Holland Owen, was born in bonnie Scotland, but when quite young came with his...

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Biography of James Harlin Hale

JAMES HARLIN HALE. In all ages of the world industry, perseverance and energy, where intelligently applied, have achieved results which could only have been gained by having one end in view, and by improving every opportunity of ultimately attaining that object. Mr. Hale is an example of what can be accomplished when the spirit of determination is exercised, in connection with the every-day affairs of life. His farming and stockraising operations have resulted most satisfactorily, and he is one of the substantial men of his section. Like so many of the representative men of Christian County, Mr. Hale is a Tennessean, born in Washington County, October 10, 1832. His parents, Mark and Polly (Mulkey) Hale, were natives of that county also, the former born in 1809 and the latter in 1811. They were reared and married in that county, and, when our subject was a boy, they removed to Barren County, Kentucky, where Mrs. Hale died two years later. Mr. Hale returned to Tennessee, and was married in McMinn County, that State, to Miss Long. Soon after, he removed to Barren County, Kentucky, where he made his home until 1850, at which date he removed to McMinn County, Tennessee, and thence to Bradley County the following year. In 1852 he came to what is now Christian County, Missouri, but later settled in Stone County, where he remained until 1858,...

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Biography of Hon. Samuel Leslie

HON. SAMUEL LESLIE. Among the representative and venerable citizens of Searcy County, Arkansas, and one who is a splendid type of the enterprise, industry and self-reliance of the early Arkansas pioneer, it is a pleasure to introduce to the readers of this volume the subject of this sketch. Considerably more than half a century ago he braved the dangers, trials and privations of pioneer life in order to establish a home and competency for his growing family, and where now are waving fields of grain then stood the mighty monarch of the forest. He was born in Barren County, Kentucky, October 25, 1809. Samuel Leslie is a son of John and Jane (McElwee) Leslie, the latter having been born in South Carolina. It is thought that Mr. Leslie was born while his parents were en route from Pennsylvania to the South, and he and his wife were married in York District, S. C., from which place they removed in 1807 to Kentucky, and when their son Samuel was about two years of age to Tennessee. Here the mother died when he was about eight years of age, but the father survived until 1840, his death occurring in Carroll County. Mr. Leslie was a farmer and mechanic, having served three years at wagon making and seven years as a weaver, and through unflagging efforts lie became possessed of a competency....

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Biography of J. M. Bird

Agricultural development in Washington County is stimulated through the intelligently directed efforts and enterprising spirit of J. M. Bird, who is the owner of a very desirable farm property on Fish creek and is also interested in oil and gas production, being very capable in the management of his business interests. He was born in Barren County, Kentucky, November 13, 1866, his parents being James and Susan (Monroe) Bird, who were also natives of the Blue Grass state. There the mother passed away and the father removed from northern Missouri to Indian Territory in February, 1901, his death occurring in Bartlesville in 1907. On the 24th of December, 1900, J. M. Bird left northern Missouri for this state, traveling with a team and covered wagon and being twenty-four days in making the trip. He had made the same journey, however, at the opening up for settlement of the Cherokee strip, being but fourteen days en route. He came at that time with the object of securing land but owing to the illness of his brother, who accompanied him, was obliged to leave without accomplishing his purpose. For a year after his last arrival he operated a rented farm on Mooney creek, three miles southwest of Dewey, after which he removed to the C. C. Wilson farm on Rice creek, cultivating that tract for four years. The next six years...

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Biographical Sketch of William Beavers

William Beavers, farmer; P. O. Hutton; is one of the pioneers of this county, and was born in Loudoun Co., Va., on 23d day of July, 1797; at the age of 17, he left home, driving a team to Barren Co., Ky., remaining there for four or five years. In the year 1818, he married Miss Nancy Bradenburg (daughter of Henry Bradenburg), and after remaining at the home of her parents one year, rented a farm for one year, and, in 1820, went to Clay Co., Ind., remaining there for seven years; in 1827, he came to Clark Co., Ill., near Westfield, and lived there for three years, and, in the year 1830, entered and moved upon the land upon which he now resides, on Sec. 10, near the village of Salisbury; he owns eighty acres. Mr. Beavers first built a log cabin, with a “puncheon floor.” The Kickapoo Indians at that time owned this land and lived all around him; while cutting some ” bee-trees ” in Long Point, this county, he saw the ” runners ” that had been sent by Black Hawk calling the Indians together. Mr. Beavers is remarkably active at his time of life, now being in his 82d year; his mother died in Virginia while he was an infant, and his father in Locust Grove, Adams Co., Ohio, where he had moved some...

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Barren County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Barren County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Barren County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Barren County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Barren County USGenWeb Archives Project 1810 Census Abstracts Magisterial District 1 Page 1 Magisterial District 1 Page 2 Magisterial District 1 Page 3 Magisterial District 1 Page 4 Magisterial District 1 Page 5 Magisterial District 1 Page 6 Magisterial District 1 Page 7 Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Barren County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Barren County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Barren County USGenWeb Archives Project 1820 Census Abstracts Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Barren County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Barren County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Barren County USGenWeb Archives Project 1830 Census Abstracts Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Barren County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1840 Census Form...

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Biography of Ira F. M. Butler

IRA F.M. BUTLER. – The honesty and wholeheartedness of a certain, and indeed, predominating, class of our early settlers is nowhere better exemplified than in Mr. Butler. Seventy-seven years of age, but still vigorous and kindly, adhering firmly to the temperance principles which have prevented the dissipation of his native course, and while well-to-do, indeed wealthy, spending much of his means in benevolent works, he is a striking example of the noble old gentleman. He was born in Barren county, Kentucky, in 1812, and was the son of Major Peter Butler, distinguished in the war of 1812. In 1829 the family moved to Illinois. Young Butler grew up on a farm in the region since designated as Warren county, remaining with his father until the outbreak of the Black Hawk war. He heard the call raised at that time to save the early settlements, and enlisting served until the Indians were quieted. The experience thus obtained served to open for him the position of deputy sheriff. In 1835 he was married to Miss Mary A. Davidson, who for more than fifty years was his devoted wife, and bore him eight children. Soon afterwards he was elected sheriff, and four years later was appointed by Stephen A. Douglas as clerk of the circuit court, filling that office seven years. In 1853 he sold his farm and closed out all his...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Jefferson Wilson

Thomas Jefferson Wilson was born in. Barren Co., Ky., on Nov. 22, 1825, and moved to Greensburg, Green Co., Ky., in 1847, where, on June 8, 1848, he was married to Lucy Ann Hutchason; he was a wagon-maker by trade; Lucy Ann Hutchason was born in Greensburg, Ky., on June 27, 1826; in April, 1857, Mr. Wilson removed with his family to Charleston, Ill., where he went into the employ of L. R. & B. M. Hutchason, his brothers-in-law, who were in the dry goods trade. On Jan. 12, 1859, his wife died in Charleston. In 1860, he began business for himself, by buying the stock of dry goods owned by Jos. Peyton, in Charleston, and he removed his stock of goods, in 1861, to Ashmore; there, by his methods of fair dealing and strict integrity in business, he soon established a flourishing trade, and became extensively known over the eastern portion of the county; he died in Ashmore on Oct. 12, 1865, and lies buried by the side of his wife, in the old cemetery near Charleston. He and his wife were both members of the Christian Church, and he was an Elder in the same while a resident of Charleston; both their lives were those of the most exemplary Christians, and they were respected, trusted and beloved where-ever they were...

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Biography of Hon. John Monroe

Hon. John Monroe, deceased, late of Charleston; was born in Glasgow, Barren Co., Ky., Sept. 24, 1811; his boyhood was passed in the private schools of his native town; his father dying when he was but a boy, he entered the apothecary-shop of his uncle, Dr. George Rogers, a physician of Glasgow, and there became familiar with the compounding of medicines, and also studied medicine under his uncle’s instruction; he first began practice in Tennessee, and, in November, 1833, came to Illinois and engaged in the practice of his profession in Shelbyville, soon removing to Charleston, and, a few years later, he engaged in business as a dry goods merchant. Returning to Kentucky, he was married, April 4, 1840, to Mrs. Martha Ferrish, a widow lady of Greensburg. in that State, and came again to Charleston; they had six children, two of whom are still living – Mrs. Stanley Walker and Lewis Monroe, of Charleston. His wife died May 14, 1854, and, on the 6th of November, 1854, he married Miss Hannah Chambers, a daughter of James and Sally Chambers, of Cynthiana, Ky., who came to Coles Co. with her parents in 1851; of five children of this marriage, three are now living – Emma (wife of Thomas T. Threlkeld, of Charleston), Virginia and Henrietta. Dr. Monroe continued in the dry goods trade in Charleston until 1858, when he...

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