Location: Barbour County AL

Biography of Judge James P. Wood

Integrity, intelligence and system are qualities which will advance the interests of any man or any profession, and will tend to the prosperity to which all aspire. The life of Judge James P. Wood in the professional arena has been characterized by intelligence, integrity, sound judgment and persevering industry. He is one of Cleburne County’s most popular and capable attorneys, who has acquired prominence because he is worthy of it. He was born on a farm in Barbour County, Ala., in 1843, a son of James and Nancy (Byrd) Wood, who were born, reared and married in the Old North State, and in 1830 moved to Barbour County, Ala., where they both died when fifty-two years of age. The father was prominent in the Democratic circles of Alabama, and also stood high in Masonry and mercantile and agricultural circles. Judge James P. Wood was the eighth of nine children born to his parents, and received his education in the Military Academy of Clayton, Ala. Early in 1861, before Alabama had succeeded from the Union, he had joined the Clayton Guards of the First Alabama Infantry, and was stationed at Pensacola for one year. At the reorganization of the Confederate Army, in 1862, he became a member of Company B, of the Thirty-ninth Alabama Infanty, and held the rank of second lieutenant. On July 28, 1864, when he was wounded...

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Sawokli Indians

Sawokli Tribe: Possibly meaning “raccoon people,” in the Hitchiti language, and, while this is not absolutely certain, the okli undoubtedly means “people.” Sawokli Connections. The Sawokli belonged to the Muskhogean linguistic stock and to the subdivision called Atcik-hata. (See Apalachicola.) Sawokli Location. The best known historic location was on Chattahoochee River in the northeastern part of the present Barbour County, Ala. (See Florida and Georgia.) Sawokli Villages Hatchee tcaba, probably on or near Hatchechubbee Creek, in Russell County, Ala. Okawaigi, on Cowikee Creek, in Barbour County, Ala. Okiti-yagani, in Clay County, Ga., not far from Fort Gaines. Sawokli, several different locations, the best known of which is given above. Sawoklutci, on the east bank of the Chattahoochee River, in Stewart County, Ga. Teawokli, probably on Chattahoochee River in the northeastern part of Russell County, Ala. Sawokli History. When first known to the Spaniards the Sawokli were living on Chattahoochee River below the falls of Columbus, Georgia, on the Alabama side. A Spanish mission, Santa Cruz de Sabacola, was established in one section of the tribe by Bishop Calderón of Cuba in 1675, and missionaries were sent to a larger body among the Creeks in 1679 and again in 1681. Most of the Indians surrounding these latter, however, soon became hostile and those who were Christianized withdrew to the junction of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers, where they were settled...

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Native American History of Barbour County, Alabama

Barbour County is located in the southeast corner of Alabama, immediately west of the Chattahoochee River and the State of Georgia. The county seat is Clayton. The county is named after Jame Barbour, a popular Virginia governor and U. S. Senator.  As Secretary of War, Barbour successfully negotiated the removal of the Creek Nation from Georgia.  He was also the first national leader to propose creation of an Indian Territory in the West. To the east, Barbour County adjoins Quitman and Stewart Counties, GA. To the south, it adjoins Henry and Dale Counties, AL, plus Clay County, GA. On the west is Pike County, AL. It also adjoins Russell County, AL on the northeast and Bullock County, AL on the northwest. Geology and Hydrology The entire county is in Alabama’s Gulf Coastal Plain. This region is underlain by relatively young sedimentary and metamorphic rocks.  The terrain is characterized by low rolling clay hills and sandy loam along river or creek bottomlands. Much of the county drains eastward into the Chattahoochee River. The Choctawhatchee River begins in Barbour County and flows southward into Henry County.  It is only navigable by canoes and small boats, whereas the Chattahoochee River would have been navigable by the largest trade canoes, or even Chontal Maya sea craft.  Another major stream is Omussee Creek, which flows into the Chattahoochee River.  The mouth of Omussee Creek...

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Barbour County, Alabama Census Records

Barbour County was formed in 1832 from the Creek cession and Pike County. Pike County, Alabama Census Records 1840 Barbour County, Alabama Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1840 Barbour County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Barbour County, Alabama Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1850 Barbour County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Barbour County, Alabama USGenWeb Archives Project Barbour County, Alabama: 1850 Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1850 U.S. Census Guide 1860 Barbour County, Alabama Census Free 1860 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1860 Barbour County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1860 U.S. Census Guide 1870 Barbour County, Alabama Census Free 1870 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1870 Barbour County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1870 U.S. Census Guide 1880 Barbour County, Alabama Census Free 1880 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1880 Barbour County, Census (images and index) 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1880 U.S....

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Barbour County, Alabama Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Historical Cemeteries hosted at Ancestry: $$$ Barbour County, Alabama Tombstone Inscriptions$$$ Clayton Cemetery Fairview Cemetery, Eufala Cemetery records, Barbour County, Alabama: $$$ Adams Chapel Cemetery, Texasville Anderson Baptist Church Cemetery, Blue Springs Anderson Cemetery Antioch Baptist Church Antioch Cemetery, Blue Springs Baptist Cemetery, Spring Hill Batesville Baptist Church Cemetery, Bakerhill Beauchamp Cemetery, White Oak Station Betcher Bethel Cemetery, Bakerhill Bethel Hardshall Baptist Church Cemetery, Blue Springs Bethlehem Cemetery, Louisville Bethsadie Cemetery, Louisville Blue Springs Assembly of God Cemetery, Blue Springs Center Ridge Cemetery, Mt. Andrew Christian Grove Cemetery, Sandy Point Corinth Baptist Church Cemetery, Blue Springs County Line Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Eufala Creel Cemetery, Texasville Cunningham Cemetery, Louisville Dykes Cemetery, Louisville Elam Baptist Church Cemetery, Elamville Ephesus Cemetery, Louisville Epworth Cemetery, Eufala Espy Cemetery, Scottsboro Evergreen Baptist Cemetery, Clayton Fairview Cemetery, Eufala Faulk Cemetery Grubbs Church Cemetery, Louisville Jones Cemetery, Spring Hill Lightner Private Cemetery, Clayton Lightwood Knot Cemetery, Louisville McElvin Private Cemetery, Eufala Methodist Cemetery, Louisville Methodist Church Cemetery, Texasville Mt. Pleasant Cemetery Louisville Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Richards Cross Roads Mt. Zion Cemetery, Louisville New Hope Cemetery, Bakerhill Old Scott Cemetery, Bakerhill Old Spring Hill Methodist Church Cemetery, Spring Hill Pea Creek Church Cemetery, Louisville Pea River Prebysterian...

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