Location: Baltimore Maryland

Ancestors of George Mitchell Hooper of Bridgewater, MA

The Hooper family, to which belonged the late George Mitchell Hooper, one of Bridgewater’s well-known citizens, is an old and distinguished one in New England. George Mitchell Hooper, son of Mitchell, was born in the town of Bridgewater Sept. 1, 1838. He received his education in the public schools and Bridgewater Academy, later attending Peirce Academy and the State normal school at Bridgewater, graduating from the latter institution in 1857. After leaving school he engaged in teaching, a profession he followed for one year and then began the manufacture of brick with his father, a business in which he engaged for half a century. He was also a surveyor. He was identified with the banking interests of Bridgewater, having been one of the trustees of the Bridgewater Savings Bank, also filling the office of clerk. He was clerk and treasurer of the Bridgewater Cemetery Association; a member of the Plymouth County Agricultural Association, of which for years he was treasurer, and was secretary; and trustee of the Memorial Public Library. He died July 2, 1909, in his seventy-first year. On Oct. 16, 1861, Mr. Hooper was married to Mary E. Josselyn, who was born at Hanson, Mass., daughter of Hervey and Elizabeth (Howland) Josselyn. She died Jan. 30, 1884, and was buried in Mount Prospect cemetery. Eight children were born of this marriage.

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Pierce Family of North Bridgewater, MA

The Pierce families of this country are and have long been very numerous. Early in the settlement of New England came representatives from England, most of them not related, so far as now known. Among them were Abraham, of Plymouth, 1623, who became one of the original purchasers of Bridgewater in 1645; Daniel, of Newbury, blacksmith, who came from Ipswich, County of Suffolk, in 1634, aged twenty-three years; John, of Dorchester, mariner from Stepney, Middlesex, before 1631; another John, of Dorchester and Boston; John, of Watertown, 1638; Capt. Michael, of Hingham and Scituate; Richard, of Portsmouth, R. I.; Robert, of Dorchester; Thomas, of Charlestown, who was admitted to the church there in 1634; and Capt. William, of Boston, who was a distinguished shipmaster of his time.

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Hussey and Morgan Families of New Bedford MA

HUSSEY-MORGAN (New Bedford families). These families, while not among those early here, are of approximately a hundred years’ standing in this community, and with their allied connections are among the very respectable and wealthy families of the locality, the heads of two of these families here considered being the late George Hussey and Charles Wain Morgan, who were extensively engaged in whaling and shipping interests here in New Bedford through much of the first half of the nineteenth century. Here follows in detail arranged chronologically from the first American ancestor the Hussey genealogy, together with that of some of its allied connections, et cetera. Christopher Hussey, baptized 18th of 2d month, 1599, at Dorking, County of Surrey, England, son of John and Mary (Wood) of that place, and for a time in Holland, married Theodate, daughter of Stephen Batchelder, and came from London to New England in the same vessel with Mr. Batchelder, arriving at Boston in the “William and Francis,” in 1632. He probably remained at Lynn, where his father-in-law was sometime minister, until 1636, then went to Newbury and there resided a year or two. He was deputy in 1637, was one of the original settlers of Hampton in 1638, at which time his mother was there with him, and was active and prominent in citizenship for many years; was town clerk in 1650; selectman in 1650-58-64-68;...

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Caton Sisters of Baltimore

Among the belles of the early century loom the forms of those gracious women whose names are interwoven with those of the most historic figures of their age, the Caton sisters of Baltimore. Granddaughters of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, one of the most illustrious Americans of the period, they became through marriage identified with the most distinguished families in England. In 1787 Richard Caton, an Englishman who had settled in Baltimore two years before, and engaged in the manufacture of cotton goods, succeeded in winning the fair hand of Mary Carroll. Rumor said that it had been already partially...

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Elizabeth Patterson, Madame Jerome Bonaparte

The city into which Baltimore Town was legislated on the last day of the year 1796 already fostered within its limits the germ of the dual life, social and commercial, to which it has owed its subsequent eminence. Not infrequently, in the days of its inception, the same roof sheltered drawing-room and warehouse, the earlier merchants deeming it necessary to keep their growing interests constantly beneath their personal vigilance. Later, the commercial life crowded out the domestic life, and merchants built their dwellings stately bricks or frames, painted blue, yellow, or white, facing on avenues of locust-trees in another...

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Biography of Henry Davault

Henry Davault was born in France, but married Catharine Maria Grover, of Germany. They emigrated to America about the year 1764, landed near Philadelphia, and settled near Hanover, York Co., Pa., where they lived and died. Mr. Davault served in the revolutionary war, under General Washington. He died at the age of 85, but his wife lived to the remarkably old age of 97 years, 4 months and ten days. They had the following children Philip, Margaret, Elizabeth and Gabriel (twins), Catharine, Mary, Henry, Valentine, Frederick, Julia, and Jacob. Philip was one year old when his parents arrived in America. He married Catharine Long. Margaret married Samuel Long. Elizabeth married John Kitzmiller. Gabriel married Mary Kitzmiller. Catharine married Nicholas Keefauver. Mary married Martin Kitzmiller. Henry married Kitty Gross. Valentine married Louisa Range. Julia married Jacob Warts. Jacob married Rachel Kitzmiller. Philip Davault had the following children Mary, Kate, Margaret, Lydia, Louisa, Daniel, and Eliza. One of these children married John Harshey, and died in Maryland. Another married William Roberts, and lived in Baltimore. Another married William Landers and lived in Illinois. Another married John Kitzmiller, and lived in Tennessee. Another married Mary Kitzmiller, and lived in Tennessee. Another married James Larrimore, and lived in Ohio. The children of Frederick Davault were Henry, Peter, David, Mary, Elizabeth, John, Louisa, Kitty, and Samuel. Most of these children settled and lived in...

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Biographical Sketch of George Bast

George Bast settled in Montgomery County in 1819. His father was a native of Germany, but came to America and settled in Baltimore. George was married first to Sarah Clark, of Lexington, Ky., by whom he had Alonzo, John, George Y., and William H. Mrs. Bast died in 1816, and her husband subsequently married Emily Courtney, by whom he had two children. She also died in 1823, and Mr. Bast was married the third time to Elizabeth Ford, by whom he had three children-Sarah, Anna, and Edward. Mr. Bast was killed by the falling of a tree, in February, 1829, and his widow married Sirenus Cox. Alonzo, the eldest son, married a Mexican lady, and lived and died in Camargo, Mexico. At his death he left a widow and several children. John married Harriet Kibbe, by whom he had-Mary, Julia, Harriet, Charles, and George. George Y., son of George Bast, Sr., is a physician, and lives at New Florence. He is a prominent and influential citizen of the County, where he is widely known and respected. He was married first to Leonora Hancock, and they had one son William. After the death of his first wife he married Sophia Jacobs, and by her had two sons George and Charles. William H. Bast is a merchant at Montgomery City. He also has a store in Kansas City, Mo., and is...

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Biography of John A. Keck

John A. Keck was born in Baltimore, Maryland, October 27, 1843, but his parents, John and Elizabeth Keck, removed from his native city when he was but six months old, and settled in Bracken county, Kentucky. From there they removed, after a residence of about six years, coming to Missouri and settling upon a farm in Shelby county, where he was reared to manhood and received his education. His mother is still living, and is a descendant of the Tevis family, who founded Tevis college, of Kentucky. His father died in Gallatin in 1876. Our subject lived with his parents in Shelby county until 1862, when he enlisted in Company B, Missouri Cavalry Militia, and served one year. He received his honorable discharge at the expiration of the time mentioned on account of being disabled by a horse falling upon him, and from the results of which accident he is still a cripple. Returning to his home in Shelby county he engaged in teaching school in that and they adjoining counties of Lewis and Knox, following that profession until 1867. The year 1868 he spent in the southern part of the State, and in 1869 came to Gallatin; receiving the appointment of deputy county clerk, he served in that capacity until 1870, and was next engaged in the drug business one: year, then became deputy postmaster under Captain John...

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Genealogy of Robert Allen Family of Baltimore Maryland

O147 ROBERT ALLEN: b. Dec. 22, 1774 (s. of Robert James Allen; was b. in Scotland in 1729; m. an Irish girl and in the 18th century landed in America and located at Baltimore, Md.); m. Sarah Underwood; had, with other issue: (1) Nehemiah: b. 1800; d. y. (2) James: b. Sept. 19, 1801; m. Ann Elizabeth Semone. Had (A) William Henry: b. Feb. 1, 1829. (B) John: b. 1838; m. a Miss Dukel. (C) Lewis: b. 1841. (D) Samuel: b. Nov. 15, 1843. The names of the wives of Lewis and Samuel are unknown. (E) Robert James: b. 1831. Contractor and builder at Baltimore; m. three times. First to Mary B. Niquet and had: (a) John Findley Burns: b. 1861. (b) Robert Samuel: b. 1863. (c) Walter Crane: b. 1875. (d) Robert James: b. 1878 and is still living; m. Eveline Nee and settled in Portsmouth, Va. Supervisor of Construction of Boilers for the U. S. Government for 25 years. They had: 1. Robert James: b. 1900. 2. Frank Hatton: of Wash., D. C.; b. 1904. 3. Marshall Crane: (artist) b. 1906. 4. Norman Niquet: (U. S. Navy) b. 1909. 5. Eveline May: b. 1913. 6. Gordon Nee: b. 1915. By his second marriage to Mary Rogers he had one dau and by the third, to Emma V. Gerbrick, had the following: (a) Emma Elizabeth: d. y. (b)...

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Slave Narrative of Jim Taylor

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Jim Taylor Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Talbot County, Maryland Date of Birth: 1847 Place of Residence: 424 E. 23rd St., Baltimore, Maryland Age: 89 Reference: Personal interview with Jim Taylor, at his home, 424 E. 23rd St., Baltimore. “I was born in Talbot County, Eastern Shore, Maryland, near St. Michaels about 1847. Mr. Mason Shehan’s father knew me well as I worked for him for more than 30 years after the emancipation. My mother and father both were owned by a Mr. Davis of St. Michaels who had several tugs and small boats. In the summer, the small boats were used to haul produce while the tugs were used for towing coal and lumber on the Chesapeake Bay and the small rivers on the Eastern Shore. Mr. Davis bought able-bodied colored men for service on the boats. They were sail boats. I would say about 50 or 60 feet long. On each boat, besides the Captain, there were from 6 to 10 men used. On the tugs there were more men, besides the mess boy, than on the sail boats. “I think a man by the name of Robinson who was in the coal business at Havre de Grace engaged Mr. Davis to tow several barges of soft coal to St. Michaels. It was on July 4th when we arrived at Havre de...

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Slave Narrative of Alice Lewis

Interviewer: Ellen B. Warfield Person Interviewed: Alice Lewis Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Wilkes County, Georgia Age: 84 (Alice Lewis, ex-slave, 84, years old, in charge of sewing-room at Provident Hospital (Negro), Baltimore. Tall, slender, erect, her head crowned by abundant snow white wool, with a fine carriage and an air of poise mud self respect good to behold, Alice belies her 84 years.) “Yes’m, I was born in slavery, I don’t look it, but I was! Way down in Wilkes County, Georgia, nigh to a little town named Washington which ain’t so far from Augusta. My pappy, he belong to the Alexanders, and my mammy, she belong to the Wakefiel’ plantation and we all live with the Wakefiel’s. No ma’am, none of the Wakefiel’ niggers ever run away. They was too well off! They knew who they friends was! My white folkses was good to their niggers! Them was the days when we had good food and it didn’t cost nothing—chickens and hogs and garden truck. Saturdays was the day we got our ‘lowance for the week, and lemme tell you, they didn’t stint us none. The best in the land was what we had, jest what the white folkses had. “Clothes? yes’m. We had two suits of clothes, a winter suit and a summer suit and two pairs of shoes, a winter pair and a summer...

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Slave Narrative of Dennis Simms

Interviewer: Stansbury Person Interviewed: Dennis Simms Date of Interview: September 19, 1937 Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Contee, Prince Georges County, Maryland Date of Birth: June 17, 1841 Place of Residence: 629 Mosher St., Baltimore, Maryland Reference: Personal interview with Dennis Simms, ex-slave, September 19, 1937, at his home, 629 Mosher St., Baltimore. Born on a tobacco plantation at Contee, Prince Georges County, Maryland, June 17, 1841, Dennis Simms, Negro ex-slave, 628 Mosher Street, Baltimore, Maryland, is still working and expects to live to be a hundred years old. He has one brother living, George Simms, of South River, Maryland, who was born July 18, 1849. Both of them were born on the Contee tobacco plantation, owned by Richard and Charles Contee, whose forbears were early settlers in the State. Simms always carries a rabbit’s foot, to which he attributes his good health and long life. He has been married four times since he gained his freedom. His fourth wife, Eliza Simms, 67 years old, is now in the Providence Hospital, suffering from a broken hip she received in a fall. The aged Negro recalls many interesting and exciting incidents of slavery days. More than a hundred slaves worked on the plantation, some continuing to work for the Contee brothers when they were set free. It was a pretty hard and cruel life for the darkeys, declares the...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Moriah Anne Susanna James

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Mary James Date of Interview: Sept. 23, 1937 Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Residence: 618 Haw St., Baltimore, MD Reference: Personal interview with Mary James, ex-slave, Sept. 23, 1937, at her home, 618 Haw St., Baltimore, Md. “My father’s name was Caleb Harris James, and my mother’s name was Mary Moriah. Both of them were owned by Silas Thornton Randolph, a distant relative of Patrick Henry. I have seen the picture of Patrick Henry many a time in the home place on the library wall. I had three sisters and two brothers. Two of my sisters were sold to a slave dealer from Georgia, one died in 1870. One brother ran away and the other joined the Union Army; he died in the Soldiers’ Home in Washington in 1932 at the age of 84. “How let me ask you, who told you about me? I knew that a stranger was coming, my nose has been itching for several days. How about my home life in Virginia, we lived on the James River in Virginia, on a farm containing more than 8,000 acres, fronting 3-1/2 miles on the river, with a landing where boats used to come to load tobacco and unload goods for the farm. “The quarters where we lived on the plantation called Randolph Manor were built like horse stables that you see on...

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Slave Narrative of Rev. Silas Jackson

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Rev. Silas Jackson Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Virginia Date of Birth: 1846 or 47 Place of Residence: 1630 N. Gilmor St., Baltimore, Maryland Age: (about) 90 Reference: Personal interview with Rev. Silas Jackson, ex-slave, at his home, 1630 N. Gilmor St., Baltimore. “I was born at or near Ashbie’s Gap in Virginia, either in the year of 1846 or 47. I do not know which, but I will say I am 90 years of age. My father’s name was Sling and mother’s Sarah Louis. They were purchased by my master from a slave trader in Richmond, Virginia. My father was a man of large stature and my mother was tall and stately. They originally came from the Eastern Shore of Maryland, I think from the Legg estate, beyond that I do not know. I had three brothers and two sisters. My brothers older than I, and my sisters younger. Their names were Silas, Carter, Rap or Raymond, I do not remember; my sisters were Jane and Susie, both of whom are living in Virginia now. Only one I have ever seen and he came north with General Sherman, he died in 1925. He was a Baptist minister like myself. “The only things I know about my grandparents were: My grandfather ran away through the aid of Harriet Tubman and went to Philadelphia and...

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