Location: Baltimore County MD

Biography of Hon. Rezin Davidge

Among the early practitioners at the bar of Christian County, none surpassed in profound legal attainments Rezin Davidge. He was a brilliant and forcible speaker, an excellent judge of law, and a faithful and conscientious attorney. Strength of mind and purity of purpose were his leading traits. In his profession of the law, these made him a great chancery lawyer, no doubt one of the ablest the county knew in the early period of its history. In that branch of the law practice, that sometimes requires scheming and cunning diplomacy, he was neither great nor very successful, a proof that his nature was faithful and just, and that his integrity of mind was better adapted to the equity courts. Judge Davidge was a native of Maryland, born in Baltimore County about the year 1770, and came to Kentucky soon after its admission into the Union as a State. He died in Hopkinsville, at ninety-seven years of age, and sleeps in the beautiful cemetery adjacent to the city. He came of a noted and wealthy family, and received all the educational advantages afforded by the infant Republic, with a finishing course in Europe. Thus his mental cultivation had been extensive, and his reading of a wider range than the average young man was able to obtain. In early life he served as midshipman in the United States Navy, and distinguished...

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Genealogy of Robert Allen Family of Baltimore Maryland

O147 ROBERT ALLEN: b. Dec. 22, 1774 (s. of Robert James Allen; was b. in Scotland in 1729; m. an Irish girl and in the 18th century landed in America and located at Baltimore, Md.); m. Sarah Underwood; had, with other issue: (1) Nehemiah: b. 1800; d. y. (2) James: b. Sept. 19, 1801; m. Ann Elizabeth Semone. Had (A) William Henry: b. Feb. 1, 1829. (B) John: b. 1838; m. a Miss Dukel. (C) Lewis: b. 1841. (D) Samuel: b. Nov. 15, 1843. The names of the wives of Lewis and Samuel are unknown. (E) Robert James: b. 1831. Contractor and builder at Baltimore; m. three times. First to Mary B. Niquet and had: (a) John Findley Burns: b. 1861. (b) Robert Samuel: b. 1863. (c) Walter Crane: b. 1875. (d) Robert James: b. 1878 and is still living; m. Eveline Nee and settled in Portsmouth, Va. Supervisor of Construction of Boilers for the U. S. Government for 25 years. They had: 1. Robert James: b. 1900. 2. Frank Hatton: of Wash., D. C.; b. 1904. 3. Marshall Crane: (artist) b. 1906. 4. Norman Niquet: (U. S. Navy) b. 1909. 5. Eveline May: b. 1913. 6. Gordon Nee: b. 1915. By his second marriage to Mary Rogers he had one dau and by the third, to Emma V. Gerbrick, had the following: (a) Emma Elizabeth: d. y. (b)...

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Slave Narrative of Thomas Foote

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Thomas Foote Location: Cockeysville, Maryland Place of Birth: Cockeysville, Maryland Date of Birth: 1865 Thomas Foote’s Story, A free Negro. Reference: Personal interview with Thomas Foote, at his home, Cockeysville, Md. “My mother’s name was Eliza Foote and my father’s name was Thomas Foote. Father and mother of a large family that was reared on a small farm about a mile east of Cockeysville, a village situated on the Northern Central Railroad 15 miles north of Baltimore City. “My mother’s maiden name was Myers, a daughter of a free man of Baltimore County. In her younger days she was employed by Dr. Ensor, a homeopathic medical doctor of Cockeysville who was a noted doctor in his day. Mrs. Ensor, a very refined and cultured woman, taught her to read and write. My mother’s duty along with her other work was to assist Dr. Ensor in the making of some of his medicine. In gaining practical experience and knowledge of different herbs and roots that Dr. Ensor used in the compounding of his medicine, used them for commercial purposes for herself among the slaves and free colored people of Baltimore County, especially of the Merrymans, Ridgelys, Roberts, Cockeys and Mayfields. Her fame reached as far south as Baltimore City and north of Baltimore as far as the Pennsylvania line and the surrounding territory. She was styled...

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Slave Narrative of Tom Randall

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Tom Randall Location: Oella, Maryland Place of Birth: Ellicott City, Howard County, Maryland Date of Birth: 1856 Reference: Personal interview with Tom Randall, at his home, Oella, Md. “I was born in Ellicott City, Howard County, Maryland, in 1856, in a shack on a small street now known as New Cut Road—the name then, I do not know. My mother’s name was Julia Bacon. Why my name was Randall I do not know, but possibly a man by the name of Randall was my father. I have never known nor seen my father. Mother was the cook at the Howard House; she was permitted to keep me with her. When I could remember things, I remember eating out of the skillets, pots and pans, after she had fried chicken, game or baked in them, always leaving something for me. When I grew larger and older I can recall how I used to carry wood in the kitchen, empty the rinds of potatoes, the leaves of cabbages and the leaves and tops of other plants. “There was a colored man by the name of Joe Nick, called Old Nick by a great many white people of me city. Joe was owned by Rueben Rogers, a lawyer and farmer of Howard County. The farm was situated about 2-1/2 miles on a road that is the extension of...

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Slave Narrative of “Parson” Rezin Williams

Interviewer: Stansbury Person Interviewed: Rezin (Parson) Williams Date of Interview: September 18 and 24, 1937 Location: Baltimore, Maryland Date of Birth: March 11, 1822 Age: 116 Place of Residence: 2610 Pierpont Street, Mount Winans, Baltimore, MD References: Baltimore Morning Sun, December 10, 1928. Registration Books of Board of Election Supervisors Baltimore Court House. Personal interviews with “Parson” Rezin Williams, on Thursday afternoon, September 18 and 24, 1937, at his home, 2610 Pierpont Street, Mount Winans, Baltimore, Md. Oldest living Negro Civil War veteran; now 116 years old. Oldest registered voter in Maryland and said to be the oldest “freeman” in the United States. Said to be oldest member of Negro family in America with sister and brother still living, more than a century old. Father worked for George Washington. In 1864 when the State Constitution abolished slavery and freed about 83,000 Negro slaves in Maryland, there was one, “Parson” Rezin Williams, already a freeman. He is now living at the age of 116 years, in Baltimore City, Maryland, credited with being the oldest of his race in the United States who served in the Civil War. He was born March 11, 1822, at “Fairview”, near Bowie, Prince Georges County, Maryland—a plantation of 1000 acres, then belonging to Governor Oden Bowie’s father. “Parson” Williams’ father, Rezin Williams, a freeman, was born at “Mattaponi”, near Nottingham, Prince Georges County, the estate...

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Robert Davis of Baltimore, Maryland

U136 ROBERT DAVIS: b. in Baltimore, Md. Served as a soldier during Revolution under Gen. Washington. Among his ch. Was U137 DENNIS DAVIS: b. in Baltimore, 1791, and d. at Black Oak, Mo. Hem. Joanna Thomas. Ch. include: (1) John T.: b. 1812, d. 1882; m. Margaret Moore, 1817. Ch. include: (A) Mary Ann: b. 1838; m. (1), Anthony Sharp; m. (2), Alford Hawkes. Issue. (B) Elizabeth Jane: b. 1841; m. James T. Ross. Issue. (C) George NV: b. 1844; m. first, Paulina Naffizinger. (a) Rosetta: b. 1866; m. Edward E. Taylor and had Etta, Ethel and Homer. (b) Mary: b. 1868. (c) Ara Daniels: b. 1869; m. Cora D. Potter; grad. Missouri Wesleyan Coll.; served in ministry of Methodist Epis­copal churches for 22 yrs., and field sec’y of Education of the Methodist Church for 2 yrs. Add.: 1654 Echo Park Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 1. Ruth B.: b. 1894; m. Vincent Correll in 1921 in Nebr. They have Vincent Correll, b. 1926. 2. Paul B.: b. 1900, 111. Gladys Munson, 1921. Studied law and admitted to state bar as an attorney-at-law. Now engaged in teaching in Omaha. One dau, Betty, b. 1923. (d) Isom G.: b. 1871. Now successfully engaged in farming and stock raising in Missouri; m. Della Fisher, 1897. 1. Clay T.: b. 1899; m. and has one dau, Marjorie Ann. 2. Joe F.: b. 1904....

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel D. Lecompte

Samuel D. Lecompte, first chief justice of the Territory of Kansas and afterward prominent on the bench of Leavenworth County, and a representative in both houses of the Legislature, was born in Dorchester County, Maryland, December 13, 1814. After graduating from Jefferson College, Pennsylvania, he studied law in Maryland and, upon being admitted to the bar, began practice in Carroll County, that state. He had served one term in the Maryland Legislature and become quite prominent politically, when he moved to Baltimore in 1854. In October, 1854, President Pierce appointed Mr. Lecompte chief justice of the Territory of Kansas, which position he held until March 9, 1859. Upon retiring from the bench he located in Leavenworth and opened a law office. At the close of the Civil war he renounced his democratic beliefs and became a republican. Judge Lecompte served four years as probate judge of Leavenworth County; represented the county in the State Legislatures of 1867-68, and on April 15, 1874, was elected chairman of the Republican Congressional Committee of the First District. In 1887 he went to Kansas City to live with his son and died there on April 24,...

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Biography of Francis Merriman Barnes, Jr., M. D.

Dr. Francis Merriman Barnes, Jr., a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University and prominently known as a neuropsychiatrist of St. Louis, was born in Middletown, New York, August 20, 1881, a son of Francis Merriman and Mary Drusilla (Reynolds) Barnes. The father, a native of Pennsylvania and a representative of one of the old families of that state of English lineage, is now a successful dentist. He was graduated from the Baltimore Dental College and is in active practice in Middletown, New York. His wife, a native of the Empire state, passed away in 1884. In their family were four sons. In the maternal line Dr. Barnes of this review can trace his ancestry back to 944 A. D., to Grethferth the Dane, king of Northumberland, who was driven from England and took refuge in Normandy. One of his descendants, Reynolds Fitz Reynolds, later returned with William the Conqueror in 1066 and there are records of the family in England and Scotland through a number of generations. In 1634 John Reynolds emigrated from Ipswich, England, to Boston, Massachusetts, and in 1635, in Watertown, was made a freeman. From this early record the family is traced down to the present time. Dr. Francis M. Barnes, Jr., the youngest member of his father’s household, attended the public and high schools of his native city and also the Delaware Literary Academy at...

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Biographical Sketch of J.H. Tripp, M.D.

J. H. Tripp, M. D., of Marble Hill, was born March 18, 1843, in Lincoln County, Tennessee, and is one of a family of seven children born to Henry and Nancy (Gattis) Tripp, both natives of North Carolina. They were married in Lincoln County, Tennessee, and the father followed agricultural pursuits until his death in 1846 or 1847. The mother is still living in Lincoln County. Our subject remained and assisted his mother on the farm until the breaking out of the late war, when he enlisted in the Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, and remained with this until the surrender at Appomattox Court House. He then returned home and engaged in farming for several years, and also secured a limited education by attending common schools for about fifteen months. He attended the Washington Medical College at Baltimore, Maryland, session of 1870-71, and then practiced at Marble Hill till 1876, after which he attended Medical College at Louisville, Kentucky. Here he graduated and resumed his practice at Marble Hill till the session of I884-85 of the medical department of the University of Tennessee, at which place he also graduated, and has since continued the practice of his profession at his home in this county. August 22, 1876, he married Sally A. Bean, to which union one child was born, Myrtle. The Doctor and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal...

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Biography of John F. Sheehan

JOHN F. SHEEHAN. – The gentleman whose name heads this brief memoir, an excellent portrait of whom appears in this history, has been a leading business man and resident of Port Townsend, Washington for almost thirty years. Mr. Sheehan is a native of the Sunny south, and was born in Baltimore Maryland, in 1840. When but an infant he suffered the irreparable loss of his father by death. His widowed mother then, with her two sons, our subject being but eighteen months old, paid a visit to Ireland, and at the end of one year returned to Baltimore. John F. was then taken by an uncle to New Orleans, where he received his education and resided until fifteen years of age. He then started out to do for himself, still being but a mere boy. He started for the Pacific coast, coming via the Nicaragua route, and arrived in San Francisco in the summer of 1856. The first two years in the Golden state were spent in the mines and at different occupations until the breaking out of the ever-memorable Frazer River excitement, when Mr. Sheehan joined the gold-seekers and came north, only to find on arriving at the mines that “All is not gold that glitters,” and also to find that the great excitement which had lured thousands was a humbug. On leaving the mines Mr. Sheehan came...

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Biography of Herman Genthe

Herman Genthe. The oldest bakery establishment of Topeka under one continuous ownership and management is that conducted by Mr. Herman Genthe, who now had associated with him his oldest son. Mr. Genthe is a master of his trade. He learned it as a boy in Germany, where his ancestors so far as known were millers and had a great deal to do with those grains that furnish the staple food stuffs, wheat and rye. Mr. Genthe’s talent as a maker of fine bread is therefore partly an inheritance from his ancestors, though it had been developed by his individual experience covering many years. He was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1857, a son of Wilhelm Genthe and a grandson of Gottlieb Genthe. His grandfather was born in 1793 and the family as far as it can be traced lived in Saxony. Wilhelm Genthe died in Saxony in 1890. Reared and educated in his native country, Herman Genthe at the age of twenty-four in 1881 left Germany and made the voyage to America. Landing in Baltimore. he was soon afterward in Waco, Texas, and visited a number of other Texas towns. Later he was in Kansas City, Missouri, then in Chicago, Illinois, and returning to Kansas, began going about among the towns and country communities of the state. and for several years in the early ‘8Os was employed at different...

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Biograhical Sketch of Frank Blackwell Mayer

Frank Blackwell Mayer, born in Baltimore, Maryland, December 27, 1827; died in 1908. Many of his paintings represented scenes in Indian life, and in 1886 he completed a canvas entitled The Treaty of Traverse des Sioux, the treaty having been signed during the summer of 1851, about the time the sketch of Kaposia was...

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Biography of William Paxton Hazen

William Paxton Hazen, who died at Chetopa, Kansas, April 16, 1909, was for many years a successful Kansas banker. His widow, Mrs. Addie (Glass) Hazen, who survives him, is widely known in women’s circles in Kansas, and is especially active in charitable and philanthropic enterprises in her home city. Mr. Hazen died when at the high tide of his usefulness. He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, July 10, 1858. His father, David Hazen, was a lawyer by profession, practiced for many years in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, but died in Erie, Kansas. Mr. Hazen’s maternal grandmother, Mary Ewing, had her pew in the First Presbyterian Church in Pittsburgh for more than forty years. She was the wife of Judge Ewing, a very prominent attorney of Western Pennsylvania. Mr. Hazen on his mother’s side is also a descendant of Roger Williams of colonial history. William P. Hazen was educated in the public schools of Pittsburgh, and after reaching manhood his parents came west to Otley, Iowa, and while in that state he attended the Agricultural College at Ames. On leaving school he came to Cherryvale, Kansas, in 1880, and from there to Thayer. He was cashier of a bank in Thayer until 1887, and then helped to build and organize the Farmers and Merchants Bank at Erie, Kansas, in which he held the post of cashier until 1893. After that for three...

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