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Location: Augusta County VA

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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Biography of James W. Miller

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Was born near Staunton, Augusta county, Virginia, May 14, 1823, where he lived with his parents, George M. and Margaret A. Miller, until his fourteenth year. He received a common school education, having attended the early subscription schools of his native county. Leaving home in 1836, he went to Lexington, Rockbridge county, Virginia, where he was employed as a clerk in the store of Moore & McCue, remaining with them until 1840, when he was employed in the same capacity by Samuel B. Finley, of the same place. From Lexington he went to Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1842, and accepted a situation as clerk in the store of John Cochran, remaining until 1843, when he returned to Augusta county and was employed by Thomas McCorkle, of Greenville, where he remained until 1847, then became associated with his employer as a partner, at Anthony’s Creek, Greenbrier county, Virginia, under the firm name of McCorkle & Miller. Retiring from the firm in 1848, he went to Hillsborough, Pocahontas county, same State, where he established himself in the mercantile business and continued there until 1854, when he migrated to Missouri, and settled upon a farm in what is now Jamesport township, this county. In 1861 he cast his lot with the Confederacy, enlisting in the Missouri State Guards, under General...

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Biographical Sketch of Edwin Beard

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Edwin Beard and his wife, Mary Bell, of Ireland, came to America and settled in Augusta Co., Va. They had William, John, David, Charles, and Samuel. The latter was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and was present at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown. He married Sarah Craig, of Staunton, Va., and settled first in Pennsylvania, from whence he removed to Kentucky in 1792, and to Missouri in 1827. His children were John, William, David, Samuel, Absalom, James, Mary B., Sarah L., and Elizabeth. William was a soldier in the war of 1812, under Gen. Harrison. He married Elizabeth Finley, of Lincoln Co., Ky., and settled in Missouri in 1830. David married Mary DeJarnette, and settled in Missouri in 1827. Samuel married Rebecca Fisher, and settled in Ohio. Absalom died unmarried, in New Orleans. James was married first to Mary J. Logan, and second to Martha A. Briggs, and settled in Missouri. Mary married Gabriel Reeds, of Kentucky, and settled in Lincoln Co., Mo., in 1830. Sarah was married first to William C. Finley, and after his death she removed to Lincoln Co., Mo., where she married McKenly Hays. She died, and Hays married her sister...

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Letter from John Crosby, Deputy Clerk, to Franklin D. Love

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Staunton, Virginia, May 13th, 1903. Mr. F.D. Love, Georgetown, Texas. Dear Sir: I am in receipt of your letter of the 14th, of April, last, addressed to the Clerk, which has been handed to me by him for reply. Our records run back to 1745, the records show the names of Robert, Samuel, Ephriam and Joseph Love, who came to this county from Pennsylvania about 1747, but as these old records are poorly indexed and some of them not indexed at all, it is quite a laborious task to look up matters of this character, and I could not undertake to furnish you with the information desired for a less sum that a fee of $25.00, on receipt of the amount I will gladly take the matter up and ascertain what the records in this office show in reference to the Loves, I have quite recently been interest in an other branch of this same family and have a great deal of information already compiled. Yours very truly, John Crosby, Deputy Clerk. Note: This is the place from which great-grandfather, Robert Love, came, and doubtless these records show a vast amount of information that I have not yet ascertained. It is not an established fact as to the exact number of brothers that this Robert Love...

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Col. Robert Love – Revolutionary War Record

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Revolutionary War Record of Col. Robert Love. (Some Data) Lieutenant Robert Love, in the year 1776 was stationed at Ft. Robertson, which was located at the head of the Clinch and Sandy rivers in what was then Montgomery County, Virginia, and served as Sergeant in Captain John Stephens company against the Shawnee Indians from April to October. 1780 he served about six months against the Tories as Lieutenant under Col. William Campbell. This service was rendered on Tom’s Creek at the Moravian Old Town in North Carolina, and on an excursion up to and near the Shallow Ford of the Yadkin. In 1781, was engaged about two months in Guilford County, N.C., and in that vicinity against Cornwallis, and was in the battle with his army at Wetzell’s Mills on the 6th, of March of that year. In 1782, was stationed at Ft. Robertson as a Lieutenant in Captain William Love’s Company from June to October. He was born in Augusta County, Virginia on the 23rd, of August 1760. When called into services was residing in Montgomery County, Virginia, now Wythe County Virginia. He died in Waynesville, N.C. Haywood County, on the 17th, day of July 1845. (Note: the above is data given to me by Mary Love Stringfield, of Haywood County, N.C. and a descendant...

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Joseph Bell

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In the name of God. Amen! I, Joseph Bell, of the County of Augusta, and state of Virginia, being of sound and disposing mind and memory do make my last Will and Testament in manner following, towit: I give my soul to Almighty God who gave it, and my body to the Earth, all my just debts and funeral expenses to be paid first, etc. Impremises, I give, demise and bequeath to my Brother, William Bell’s two oldest children, James Bell and Elizabeth Bell, two hundred acres of land on both sides of the South River adjoining the line that William once owned; the division line to run nearly North and South crossing the South River to the Patent line, so as to include my two dwelling houses; also one hundred acres of pine land adjoining Alexander Long’s line; also each of them a good feather bed and furniture, and to be their heirs and assigns forever. Secondly, I demise to my Nephew, John Gamble’s heirs, one hundred acres of land adjoining the above land, the line to run nearly North and South, crossing the South River to the Patent line of Beverly Manor; also, one hundred acres of pine land on the South end of the old tract adjoining Bell line, to them, their heirs...

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Captain William Nalle’s Company

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A List Of Captain William Nalle’s Company Of Volunteers in The Augusta County Regiment William Nalle, Captain Martin Nalle, Lieutenant Jacob Pence, Ensign John Bush, Sergeant William Bush, Sergeant Bernard Crawford, Sergeant Privates Shadrick Butler William Feavill Robert Mains Moses Smith Stephen Washburn Israel Meaders Henry Owler John Griggsby Richard Welch Zacarias Lee John Goodall Benjamin Petty Michael Jordan Bruten Smith James Todd William Spicer James Washburn Charles Brown James Alexander George Rucker Joseph Ray (or Roay) William Scales John Bright Yenty Jackson John Owler George Fuls (or Fultz) James Miller George Harmon John Chisholm Adam Hansbarger Henry Cook John Breden Thomas Brooke Henry Miner Chesley Rogers Zapaniah Lee Zachiaus Plunkenpiel Micajah Smith William Smith John Deck John Fry John Williams Joseph Butler James Selby James Reary Abraham Rue Jacob Null John Null. – Total...

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Biography of William Horner Cocke

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now With various corporate interests William Horner Cocke has been closely associated, these various business enterprises benefiting by the stimulus of his industry, keen sagacity and capable management. He has made for himself a most creditable position in business circles and since 1908 has been president and general manager of the Commercial Acid Company which in 1918 became the Southern Acid & Sulphur Company of St. Louis, while with various other concerns he is also associated as stockholder or official. He was born in City Point, Virginia, September 12, 1874. His father, Henry Teller Cocke, was born in Prince George county, Virginia, October 5, 1841, and came of English ancestry, the family having been founded in Surry county, Virginia, in 1684. Representatives in the direct line remained In Prince George county, which was formerly a part of Surry county until William H. Cocke left Missouri in 1894 or for a period of two hundred and ten years. They were always prominent in the social and political life of Virginia. Henry Teller Cocke served for four years with the Prince George Cavalry of the Confederate army and in days of peace devoted his time to farming and merchandising. He married Elizabeth Welsh Horner in December, 1870. She was born April 3, 1848, at Warrenton, Virginia, and was also...

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Biography of William A. Baker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The commercial interests of Moscow are well represented by William Alexander Baker, a leading and enterprising merchant, whose well directed efforts, sound judgment and reliable dealing are bringing to him a creditable and satisfactory success. For twelve years he has carried on operations in Moscow, where he deals in both new and second-hand goods. He is a native of Virginia, born in Augusta County, July 13, 1855, of Scotch-Irish descent. His grandfather, Guinn Baker, was the founder of the family in the Old Dominion, and was an industrious and respected farmer and a valued member of the Methodist church. He devoted his entire life to agricultural pursuits in Virginia, and died at the age of eighty-two years. His son, Frank Baker, father of our subject, was born in Pennsylvania and married Miss Martha Guinn, a native of Virginia. They removed to Tippecanoe County, Indiana, and he began farming on a tract of land of forty acres, but as time passed he extended the boundaries of his place until it comprised one hundred and forty acres. His wife died in her forty-second year, but he lived to be seventy-one years of age. Both enjoyed the high regard of their fellow men, and their lives were well spent. They had a family of three daughters and two sons,...

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Biographical Sketch of John McKinney

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John McKinney, of Staunton, Virginia, served in the American army during the latter part of the revolution, and had his thigh broken by a musket ball, which lamed him for life. He settled at Lexington, Kentucky, where he taught school, and was elected Sheriff of the County. He married a Mexican woman, by whom he raised a large family. In 1805 he came to Missouri on a trading and prospecting tour, and in 1809 he moved his family here. When the Indian war began, he took his family back to Kentucky, to get them out of danger. His son Alexander remained married Nancy Bryan, who was only sixteen years of age, and settled near Charrette creek, in (now) Warren County. He was a surveyor and a fine business man, and accumulated a fortune before his death. He also served in the State Legislature during several sessions. His sister Elizabeth married John King, who settled near Marthasville. John McKinney traveled back and forth between Kentucky and Missouri as long as he lived, trading in land and land...

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Biography of Tams Bixby

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now When historians of the future write of the state of Oklahoma, or recite the romance of the American Indian, they needs must tell the story of Tams Bixby. Above his signature five great Indian nations ceased to be, one hundred and one thousand red-men foreswore allegiance to their tribal chieftains to become citizens of the United States and twenty-one million acres of Indian hunting grounds were made ready for admission to the Union. It was in 1897 that Tams Bixby left Minnesota, where he had gained national prominence as chairman of the Republican state central committee and came to Indian Territory with a portfolio from President McKinley as a commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. Here in the Indian Territory the people of the five tribes the Choctaws, Chickasaws, Cherokees, Seminoles and Creeks were making their last stand against the advancing civilization of the white man. Driven from their homes in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi they had migrated hence with great fortitude and suffering to a land that had been promised them “as long as grass grows and water flows.” Already they had adopted the white man’s modes of living in a rough wild way but they clung, with the fidelity of their fathers, to their tribal forms of government. Each nation owned its land in...

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Biographical Sketch of Seton Johns

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Seton Johns, farmer; P. O. Charleston; was born in Augusta Co. Va., Nov. 22, 1832; he is the second son, and came with his parents to Gallia Co., Ohio, when he was 2 years of age, and from there to Hutton Tp. in the year 1838, and lived with them up to the time of their death, which occurred in May, 1854, his parents dying within three days of each other. The same fall Mr. Johns married Miss Armilda Rennels (daughter of Wm. Rennels, of Hutton Tp.), and immediately after moved to his farm, one-fourth mile east of his present location, moving to his present home on Sec. 33 in the year 1858, where he has resided ever since; his farm contains 160 acres, all but 40 of which are improved. He has held the office of Assessor one term. His wife was born April 9, 1837; they had eleven children, nine living; two boys, one living – Philip S.-and one that died in infancy; nine girls, eight living – Martha E. (now Mrs. C. H. Gwin, of Hutton Tp.), Elizabeth, Delilah, Mary J., Alberta, Lilian B., and Nora and Flora, twins; one deceased-Rebecca J. His family is a member of the United Brethren Church. His brother, Silas Johns, was the youngest of the three boys,...

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Biography of Rev. St. Michael Fackler

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now THE REV. ST. MICHAEL FACKLER. – The Reverend Mr. Fackler was the first clergyman of the Protestant Episcopal church in Oregon. He was a native of Staunton, Virginia, first moved to Missouri, and then crossed the plains for his health in the year 1847. This was greatly improved by the trip; and he soon undertook such work as he could do, teaching and preaching as opportunity offered. For a short time he taught in the Methodist school at Salem, the progenitor of the present Willamette University. At an early day he secured a farm not far from Butteville, where he resided for a number of years. While thus occupied in secular affairs he was not idle as a clergyman; for he spent his Sundays in holding services at Champoeg, Butteville, Stringtown, Oregon City, Portland and on the Tualatin Plains. In the course of time he fitted up a schoolhouse at Champoeg for services and built a neat little church at Butteville, doing most of the work with his own hands. It was the day of small things then, and those who knew anything of the Episcopal church were very few indeed. In 1853 the Reverend Mr. Fackler was one of a small number of Episcopalians who met at Oregon City to consult in regard to the...

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Biographical Sketch of A. T. Armstrong

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A. T. Armstrong of Newport, was born in Augusta County, Virginia, in 1844. His parents, Archibald and Betty (McCutchan) Armstrong, were natives of the Old Dominion, and the fourth generation born and reared on the same farm. They had nine children. Their father died in 1853, and the subject of this sketch took charge of the home place until 1864, when he entered Company A, First Virginia Cavalry, C. S. A., and served until 1865. From the close of the war until 1867 he again had charge of the farm; he then sold out, moved to Rockbridge County, Virginia, and followed farming there until 1871, when he came to California. On arriving here he first rented land for some four years, and then bought the ranch which he now occupies one mile east of Newport. For several years he carried on general fanning and stock-raising, but recently has turned his attention to dairying. He was married in 1871 to Miss Mattie Firebaugh, also a native of Virginia, a daughter of David and Margaret Firebaugh. Their four children are: Minnie, now Mrs. Frank Baxter, of Fullerton; Berta, Willie and...

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Biography of W. B. Zimmerman

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now W. B. Zimmerman, farmer; P. O. Oakland; one of the early settlers of Coles Co., Ill.; born in Augusta Co., Va., Feb. 4, 1826, where he lived until eleven years of age, when he emigrated with his parents to Illinois, and located in Edgar Co., in 1837; in the fall of 1838, they located in what is now known as East Oakland Tp., near where Mr. Zimmerman has since lived; he being the oldest son of Martin Zimmerman who emigrated from Virginia at the above date with a family of nine children; and the year following their arrival the whole family was prostrated by malarial disease with the exception of the subject of this sketch, who had the labor of managing the forty acres which his father had purchased, and the following spring found the family largely in .debt; he remained with his father until 20 years of age, when he worked out five months at $9 per month, giving his father half of his earnings and being himself soon after prostrated by sickness, which consumed his own earnings for doctor bills and medicine; the following year he worked out by the month at $10 per month, and having saved about $75, and owning a two year colt, he hired a horse to put in his...

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