Location: Auburn New York

History of Cayuga County New York

This history of Cayuga County New York published in 1879, provides a look at the first 80 years of existence for this county, with numerous chapters devoted to it’s early history. One value of this manuscript may be found in the etched engravings found throughout of idyllic scenes of Cayuga County including portraits of men, houses, buildings, farms, and scenery. Included are 90 biographies of early settlers, and histories of the individual townships along with lists of men involved in the Union Army during the Civil War on a regiment by regiment basis.

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Biography of William Henry Seward

William H. Seward was born May 16, 1801, in the village of Florida, Town of Warwick, Orange County, New York. His father, Dr. Samuel S. Seward, was a physician of good standing and the first Vice-President of the County Medical Society. Dr. Seward was a farmer, as well as physician, and also the magistrate, storekeeper, banker and money-lender of the little village. He lived to a good old age, dying after his son’s election to the United States Senate, in 1849. The family was of New Jersey origin. John Seward, the grandfather of William Henry, served in the war of the Revolution, beginning as Captain and ending his campaign as Colonel of the First Sussex Regiment. William Henry was the fourth of six children, and following the custom of those days, was selected as the least physically robust, to receive a college education. The village school, the academy at Goshen, a term or two in a short-lived academy at Florida, gave him his preparatory training, and at the age of fifteen, he passed the examination for the junior class at Union College, Schenectady, though the rules as to age at that institution compelled him to enter as a sophomore. He graduated in 1820, having also spent six months of his senior year teaching in Georgia. He was admitted to the bar in 1822 and settled in Auburn, N. Y....

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Biography of James H. Hoskins

James H. Hoskins, dealer in high grade investment securities, is also well known in the business circles of St. Louis as the president of the Al Fresco Advertising Company. He belongs to that class of enterprising, energetic and farsighted business men upon whose activity the development and prosperity of the city has been built through the past quarter of a century or more. Mr. Hoskins was born in Auburn, New York, December 21, 1859, a son of James H. Hoskins, who was a native of New York and a descendant of John Hoskins, who came from England to the new world in 1632, settling in Connecticut. James H. Hoskins, Sr., was a successful business man who resided in Auburn to the time of his death, which occurred in 1902, when he had reached the age of seventy-two years. In early manhood he had wedded Esther C. Stoner, a daughter of John and Jane (Cuddebach) Stoner. The Cuddebachs are of Holland descent and the family was founded in America by Abram Cuddebach, the great-great-grandfather of James H. Hoskins of this review. Coming to the new world, he settled in the Mohawk valley prior to the Revolutionary war. The ancestry in the Stoner line includes Nicholas Stoner, the great-great-grandfather, who was widely known as a Revolutionary war veteran, trapper and hunter, as was his father, John Stoner. In fact the Stoner...

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Biography of Hon. De Forest H. Andrews

It is the enterprise and character of the citizens that enrich and ennoble the commonwealth. From individual enterprise have sprung all the splendor and importance of this great west. The greatest businessmen have developed from the humblest origins, and from clerkships have emerged men who have built up great business enterprises. Among those who have achieved prominence as men of marked ability and substantial worth in Boise is the subject of this sketch. De Forest H. Andrews, one of the most successful real-estate dealers of Idaho. A native of Auburn, New York, he was born on the 23d of May, 1841, and is a representative of one of the old families of that state. His grandfather, Salmon Andrews, was a resident of Syracuse, New York. His father, Salmon S. Andrews, was born in the Empire state, and there married Miss Sarah Stolp, a lady of German descent. In 1843 they removed to Aurora, Illinois, where for a time Mr. Andrews was engaged in farming. Later he removed to Valparaiso, Indiana, where he died at the age of seventy years. Mrs. Andrews then made her home with her son in Leadville, Colorado, where she died in the sixty-eighth year of her age. This worthy couple were the parents of eleven children, but only three are now living. De Forest H. Andrews acquired his education in the public schools of Indiana...

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Biographical Sketch of Michall F. Donovan

Donovan, Michall F.; manufacturer; born, Corning, N. Y., 1863; son of John and Mary Leary Donovan; educated, Corning, N. Y.; married, Auburn, N. Y., 1905, Margaret Holmes; learned the printer’s trade, starting when 14, and worked at it for eight years, working in large cities of New York State, Syracuse, Albany, Troy and New York City; became interested in the manufacture and sale of typewriting machines in 1885; in 1892, started the making of typewriter ribbons in Cleveland; later added the making of carbon papers; see’y and treas. The Buckeye Ribbon and Carbon Co.; member Cleveland Credit Men’s...

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Biographical Sketch of James Donovan

Donovan, James; manufacturer; born, Corning, N. Y., Jan. 15, 1867; son of John and Mary Leary Donovan; educated, Parochial School, Corning, N. Y.; married, Cleveland, Nov. 23, 1903, Evelyn Berry; in 1884, entered the employ of “The Fair” Department Store in Corning, a few years later, removed to Auburn, N. Y., taking charge of a store in that city for the same company; 1894, came to Cleveland, and engaged in his present business of manufacturing typewriter ribbons and carbon papers; pres. The Buck-eye Ribbon and Carbon Co.; member Chamber of...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank Rufus Herrick

Herrick, Frank Rufus; lawyer; born, Cleveland, April 26, 1864; son of Gamaliel E. and Ursula Andrews Herrick; graduate of Yale University, A. B., 1888; married, Auburn, N. Y., Oct. 7, 1891, Josephine Pomeroy; issue, Theodore Pomeroy, April 1, 1893, Sherlock Andrews, May 4, 1896, Josephine Ursula, Aug. 1, 1897; admitted to bar in October, 1890, starting in office of G. E. & J. F. Herrick; firm of Herrick & Hopkins formed 1893; for years on faculty of Law School of Western Reserve University, at one time having course in Torts and later the course in Public Service Companies; director and for time sec’y Childrens’ Fresh Air Camp; member Delta Kappa Epsilon, Chamber of Commerce, Country, Union and University...

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Biography of Edwin Ruthven Heath

Edwin Ruthven Heath, a prominent physician and specialist of Kansas City, Kansas, had a record among Kansas citizens that is unique. As a boy he knew the terrors, excitements and thrilling incidents of life in California following the discovery of gold in ’49. As a traveler both in North and South America he had contributed a part of the world’s knowledge of geography, peoples and science. He spent twelve years in South America, practiced medicine in remote construction camps and among wild and semi-barbarous tribes, and he helped build some of the pioneer railways of that continent. To as great a degree as it could be said of any one, Dr. Heath had lived the strenuous life. He had been a resident of Kansas since 1881, and here had given his chief attention to the practice of medicine. Dr. Heath was born at Janesville, Wisconsin, July 13, 1839. He is the only survivor of three children whose parents were James and Madelia McLean (Boyce) Heath. Both parents came from Vermont, and his father, James, was the youngest of nineteen children. Dr. Heath’s brother, Ivon D., was a successful farmer, was a friend of Dr. Root, surgeon of the Kansas Seventh Regiment in the Union Army, and Ivon was made hospital steward under Colonel Cloud and served in that capacity through the war. In 1848, during the historic gold rush...

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John Elliott Todd of Baldwinsville NY

John Elliott Todd6, (John5, Timothy4, Jonathan3, John2, Christopher1) born April 22, 1805, died April 22, 1868, married first, Sept. 12, 1825, Sophia Fox, of Colchester, Conn., who was born July 22, 1805, died Dec. 14, 1866. He married second, May 22, 1867, Eleanor A. Westfall, who was born Nov. 3, 1816. He was a physician. Lived in Auburn, N. Y., Philadelphia, Penn., and Baldwinsville, N. Y. Children: *583. Sophia Helen, b. Jan. 8, 1830. 584. Cornelia Marther, b. Oct. 31, 1832, d. Feb. 7, 1860. 585. John Elliott, b. March 4, 1836; at one time lived in Philadelphia, Pa. 586. William Ely, b. March 7, 1839, d. March 8, 1870. 587. Timothy Smith, b. March 18, 1842, m. March 25, 1873, Mary J. Sinclare, who was b. Aug. 15, 1842; he was a machinist. Lived in Clinton, Iowa. 588. Frances Eliza, b. Oct. 30, 1850, m. Nov. 20, 1878, Ralph...

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Biography of Rev. James T. Dougherty

When De Nonville and his French army, in 1687, destroyed the Indian village of Gannagaro and Gaudougarae, the inhabitants were driven eastward and formed a village near the foot of Canandaigua Lake, which village and lake have since then borne that name. Among the Indian inhabitants in those days were many Catholics, some of them Senecas and most of them Hurons and Algonquin captives, the result of fifty years of missionary labor of the zealous Jesuits. Even in our day the beads and crucifixes given the Indians by the missionaries are still picked up on the sites of the old Indian towns. Following the revolution and the white settlement of western New York, Canandaigua became a prominent center of commerce and government, and no doubt many Catholics were among the pioneers. The family of Hugh Collins came as early as 1823, others followed, and there are traditions of lumber wagons leaving here Saturday afternoons to bring the people to the Sunday mass at St. Patrick’s in Rochester. About 1840 Rev. Bernard O’Reilly, of Rochester, said the first mass in Canandaigua in the Patrick Doyle house on Antis street. Mass was celebrated in various homes for the following few years. At length, in 1844, a lot was purchased by Father O’Reilly from Thomas Beals, and in the fall of 1846 the pew books give the following list of pewholders. On...

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Biography of Walter L. Fay

Walter L. Fay, who has been prominently identified with manufacturing interests for many years, is a son of Edmund B. Fay, who was born in Fulton, Oswego county, New York, and was finally engaged in the wholesale dry goods business in New York City. Walter L. Fay was born in Auburn, Cayuga county, New York, his mother’s home, February 5, 1859. He was educated in the Pingry School, Elizabeth, New Jersey, from which he was graduated at the age of eighteen years. He immediately entered upon his business career, working for his father for a short time, then, in 1879, entered the employ of D. M. Osborne & Company, Auburn, as an office boy, receiving a salary of fifty cents a day. He commenced at the bottom of the ladder, and by his faithful attention to the duties entrusted to him, he mounted steadily until he had attained an important position in the office. At the expiration of four years he accepted a position with A. W. Stevens & Son, the senior member of this firm being a pioneer in the field of thresher and steam engine building. After working for this firm for thirteen years, Mr. Fay started in business for himself, associating himself in a partnership with Ernest S. Bowen, the firm doing business under the name of Fay & Bowen, and manufacturing bicycle spokes and spoke...

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Biography of Hugh Cardinal Crawford

President, secretary and manager of the Springfield Tool Company, was born in Stafford, Connecticut, in 1893, the son of Herbert Merrill and Jennie (Cardinal) Crawford. The name of Crawford, represented in the United States and Canada by many men who have been conspicuous in almost every field of human endeavor, is of Scotch origin. wherever found, and although some of the immigrant ancestors of the name came to this country from the North of Ireland, and were of Scotch-Irish descent, the name was derived directly from Scotland. (I) John Crawford was the immigrant ancestor of the branch of the family to which Hugh Cardinal Crawford belongs. He is likewise the ancestor of all the Crawfords who live in Union, Connecticut. Migrating from Scotland to the North of Ireland, he lived there until 1732, when he sailed from Belfast, Ireland, to Boston, Massachusetts, with his wife and four sons. At Sable Island a storm wrecked the vessel on which they were passengers, and Mrs. Crawford was among those who were drowned. (II) Hugh Crawford, son of John Crawford, was nineteen when he arrived in America with the family. He settled in Newton, Massachusetts, and continued to live there until he settled in Union, Connecticut, in 1740, and bought land at his new home. He was a weaver by trade, and on record in 1743 as the owner of extensive lands....

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Logan Monument, Auburn, New York

From Syracuse, and the Monument to Onondaga Indians, the Mohawks once more headed down the Great Central Trail of the Iroquois to the City of Auburn. There, in the Fort Hill Cemetery, Fort Street, Auburn, the warriors saw the remains of a huge Indian mound in the center of which was a gigantic stone shaft monument erected to a great Cayuga Chief named Logan. Chief Logan, Tah-gah-jute christened Logan, 1725-1780, renowned Cayuga sachem, statesman, orator and warrior. He was born in the Indian village Wasco near here. His memory remains enshrined in the Finger Lakes Country as the friend...

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Logan Elm And Monument, Circleville, Ohio

Logan, Chief of the Mingoes, was a Cayuga Indian, born at Auburn, New York in 1726. He was the son of Chief Shikellamy, deputy of the Six Nations over the Indians at a section of Pennsylvania. Like his father, Logan was a firm friend of the white man. Upon moving to Ohio, Logan was made chief of the mingoes. During the year 1774 a band of adventurers and “land grabbers” under the leadership of a Captain Michael Cresap and Daniel Greathouse, who were encouraged by a Dr. John Connolly, said to have been under the hire of Governor Dunmore, of Virginia, declared war on all Indians. Dunmore wished an Indian war as an excuse to drive the Shawnees and other Indians from their lands which Dunmore and the rest of the Virginian land speculators coveted. These border ruffians first killed two unsuspecting Indians who were traveling down the Ohio River with some traders. They then attacked and killed some other peaceful Indians who were camped on Cantina Creek. After these murders had been completed, the Virginians marched to Yellow Creek where they knew Logan’s family were living. At dawn, April 30th, the white men entered the Indian camp. They invited the Indians to go to a tavern nearby, promising them rum. Logan, at the time was away on a hunting trip. The Indians accepted the invitation. At the tavern...

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