Location: Attica Indiana

Biography of T. W. Swigart

T. W. Swigart, the leading harness dealer and one of the most successful business men in Newman and Douglas County, was born in Carroll County, Maryland, in sight of A Westminister, July 3, 1831, and was a son of Joseph Swigart. When nine years of age T. W. Swigart removed with his parents to Seneca County, Ohio, where he spent a large portion of his life on a farm. From the years 1848 to 1851 he devoted his time to learning the trade of harness maker at Bellefontaine, Ohio. He was a young man of good habits and of splendid mechanical turn of mind; he learned the trade thoroughly and soon became a first-class work-man. In the year 1852 he removed to Attica, Indiana, where he resided and worked at his trade successfully up to the year 1870, when he went to Princeton, Illinois. There he met Miss Sarah Jane Martin, who, in 1871, became his wife. In the same year he came to Danville, Illinois, where he followed his trade until the month of February, 1873, when he came to Newman and succeeded Speelman & Ogden in the harness business. During his residence in Newman he has become one of the most successful business men in the city and has accumulated quite a lot of property. In politics he is thoroughly independent and there is very little of...

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Biography of Samuel P. Atkinson

Samuel P. Atkinson. Perhaps Champaign has no more sturdy and progressive citizen than is found in Samuel P. Atkinson, manager of the S. P. Atkinson Monument Company. He is a thorough American, with a backing of colonial ancestry and Revolutionary stock; and is a veteran of the great struggle which prior to 1914 the people of the United States has called the saddest page on the world’s history. Mr. Atkinson is a vigorous and able business man, but he is much more, for he has the true welfare of his city at heart and is zealously working to advance movements that will be of the greatest permanent benefit to the whole community. His entire life has been a busy, useful and interesting one. Samuel P. Atkinson was born in Central Ohio, November 26, 1844. His parents were Peabody and Marenda (Elliott) Atkinson, both of whom were descendants of Revolutionary heroes and natives of New Hampshire. The old Atkinson homestead situated ten miles from Concord, New Hampshire, was the cause of a pilgrimage made by Samuel P. Atkinson in 1916, and in the vicinity, with other kindred of generations gone, rest the ashes of his grandfather, Joseph C. Atkinson. To Peabody Atkinson and wife seven children were born, namely: Henry and Mary, both of whom are deceased; Joseph, who is living in Ohio; George, who is deceased; Samuel P.; and...

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Biography of A. A. Arms

A. A. Arms, now living retired at Thomasboro, has truly lived the strenuous life. He has entered heartily into all the experiences that come to the farmer in a new country and after subduing his own acres and acquiring the fatness of the land he was not content to settle down into a life of studied ease, but has sought adventure and knowledge far afield. Mr. Arms is without doubt the best known hunter in Champaign County. He has the riches of trophies gained from the chase sufficient to stock a museum. He has traveled to many remote fastnesses of the wild game and knows the haunts and character of wild animals from the standpoint of the naturalist as well as the hunter. Mr. Arms comes of pioneer stock. He is a son of Orrin and Cynthia A. (Hubbard) Arms. His grandfather Hubbard spent his early life at Sheffield, Massachusetts, and soon after Indiana was admitted to statehood, which occurred in the year 1818, he migrated to this far western country and settled at the highest point then occupied by a white resident on the Wabash River at the mouth of the Vermilion. He arrived in the spring and his nearest neighbor, excepting Indians, was a white family ten miles below who arrived in the following November. In that frontier district he began making a home, and he went...

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Biography of Nelson Case, Hon.

Hon. Nelson Case. It would be difficult to properly and justly review the history of Oswego and its responsible men through whose activities and public-spirited endeavors this city had attained its present importance and prestige, without giving due attention to the life of Hon. Nelson Case, who for forty-eight years had been a resident here, and who as a lawyer, judge, city official and counsel for large business interests, had been prominently identified with the municipality’s progress and development. Judge Case was born at Falls, Wyoming County, Pennsylvania, April 22, 1845, a son of Chauncey and Mary Elma (Roberts) Case. He comes of Revolutionary ancestors, and belongs to one of America’s old families, the original ancestor being John Case, who emigrated from England, and was one of the original parties to receive land grants at Simsbury, Connecticut from the Crown, and the first delegate to the General Court from Simsbury. He died February 21, 1704. William Case, son of the emigrant, was born January 5, 1665, and died at Simsbury, March 3, 1700. His son was James Case, the great-great-grandfather of Judge Case, who spent his life at Simsbury, where he was born March 12, 1693, and died September 26, 1759. Amasa Case, the great-grandfather of Judge Nelson Case, was born at Simsbury, October 18, 1731, and after a life passed in agricultural pursuits, died August 18, 1824. Among...

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Attaway, Bessie McCulley Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Baker County, Oregon Bessie Attaway, 102, of Baker City, died Oct. 16, 2005, at St. Elizabeth Care Center. Her memorial graveside service will be at 2 p.m. Friday at Mount Hope Cemetery. Pastor Lennie Spooner of the First Church of the Nazarene will officiate. Bessie was born on Nov. 7, 1902, at Attica, Ind. She was the fourth of nine children born to James and Stella McCulley. As a young girl she moved with her family to Phoenix, Ariz. She spent most of her childhood and school years there. Bessie met and married her high school sweetheart, Alford Attaway, at Phoenix. They were married 61 years. Their married life was spent in Southern California. Bessie was known by her family and friends affectionately as “Grandma Bessie.” She loved knitting, crocheting, fishing, gardening and camping. She was preceded in death by her husband, Al, who died in 1981 and was the last surviving sibling. “We all will miss our Grandma Bessie. For almost 103 years she cared for all, without a complaint,” her family said. Survivors include her son, Jim Attaway, and his wife, Connie, of Baker City; four grandchildren, Cathy Blankinship, Johnny Attaway, Susie Cassidy and Danny Attaway; six great-grandchildren and nine great-great grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Rachel Center through Gray’s West & Co., P.O. Box 726, Baker City, OR 97814. Used with...

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Biography of Anderson Cox

ANDERSON COX. – There has never lived a man in the Northwest more worthy of commemoration than that pioneer of 1845, Anderson Cox. He was born near Dayton, Ohio, in 1812, of Quaker parentage, and moved with the family to Indiana in 1830, and claimed a share in the home formed on the Wabash river at Attica. He was married in 1836 to Miss Julia Walter, and in 1840 removed to New London, Iowa. In 1845, with his wife and four children, he made the journey to Oregon, and was in the company of immigrants who endured the privations and rugged experiences of the “Meek cut-off”. At the Des Chutes, the crossing of this turbulent river was effected by drawing the loaded wagon-beds over as ferries by means of ropes. Two canoes served to convey the family and their goods from The Dalles to a point known as Parker’s cabin, on the Lower Columbia. A return to The Dalles from this point was attempted, with flour for the immigrants still coming, and with the purpose of bringing down the wagons left at the mission. The journey, however, was discontinued at the Cascades, as there the flour was all given away to hungry parties coming from above, and as news was received that the wagons had been burned by the Indians. Returning to the Willamette, he found work and an...

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Biography of Peter O’Sullivan

We are pleased to accord to the esteemed gentleman of ability whose name heads this paragraph a representation in this volume of our county’s history since he has been very prominent in the affairs of Wallowa county from its incipiency, and its councils have profited much from his keen foresight and excellent wisdom, while as a private citizen he has manifested capabilities that are praiseworthy and commensurate therewith are his unsullied moral qualities and upright principles which have ever been a polar star in guiding him in all his arduous and responsible service in the state as well as in other states heretofore. It is frequently that we are called to the famous little isle of Goldsmith and Emmet when we trace the birth of some of our most loyal and prominent citizens, and such is the case in this pleasant task now before us. Peter O’Sullivan was born in Ireland in 1845, and while yet an infant in swaddling clothes his parents brought him to Vermont, whence they removed to Attica, Indiana, and later to Missouri. In this latter state our subject received his education and remained with his parents until they passed away. At the early age of fourteen he engaged in farm work for himself and when the war broke out he joined Company K, Thirty-fourth Missouri Infantry. The company was composed of young associated of...

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