Location: Atoka County OK

The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man to witness, except that of Sam Dale, the great scout of General Andrew...

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Slave Narrative of Morris Hillyer

Person Interviewed: Morris Hillyer Location: Alderson, Oklahoma Age: 84 My father was Gabe Hillyer and my mother was Clarisay Hillyer, and our home was in Rose, Georgia. Our owner was Judge Hillyer. He was de last United States senator to Washington, D. C., before de war. My mother died when I was only a few days old and the only mother I ever knew was Judge Hillyer’s wife, Miss Jane. Her nine children were all older than I was and when mother died Miss Jane said mother had raised her children and she would raise here. So she took us into her house and we never lived at de quarters any more. I had two sisters, Sally and Sylvia, and we had a room in de Big House and sister Sally didn’t do nothing else but look after me. I used to stand with my thumb in my mouth and hold to Miss Jane’s apron while she knitted. When Judge Hillyer was elected be sold out his farm and gave his slave a to his children. He owned about twelve or fourteen slaves at this time. He gave me and my sister Sylvia to his son, Dr. Hillyer, and my father to another one of his sons who was studying law. Father stayed with him and took care of him until he graduated. Father learned to be a good...

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Slave Narrative of Nancy Rogers Bean

Person Interviewed: Nancy Rogers Bean Location: Hulbert, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Boggy Depot, Oklahoma Age: 82 I’m getting old and it’s easy to forget most of the happenings of slave days; anyway I was too little to know much about them, for my mammy told me I was born about six years before the war. My folks was on their way to Fort Gibson, and on the trip I was born at Boggy Depot, down in southern Oklahoma. There was a lot of us children; I got their names somewheres here. Yes, there was George, Sarah, Emma, Stella, Sylvia, Lucinda, Rose, Den, Pamp, Jeff, Austin, Jessie, Isaac and Andrew: we all lived in a one room log cabin on Master Rogers’ place not far from the old military road near Choteau. Mammy was raised around the Cherokee town of Tahlequah. I got my name from the Rogers, but I was loaned around to their relatives most of the time. I helped around the house for Bill McCracken, then I was with Cornelius and Carline Wright, and when I was freed my Mistress was a Mrs. O’Neal, wife of a officer at Fort Gibson. She treated me the best of all and gave me the first doll I ever had. It was a rag doll with charcoal eyes and red thread worked in for the mouth. She allowed me one...

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Biographical Sketch of Rev. Samuel Gladman

Rev. Samuel Gladman, who died Jan. 11, 1913, at Eufaula, Oklahoma, was a native of Westchester, Chester County, Pennsylvania. During the early seventies he went to western Texas and engaged in teaching. Sometime afterwards he was licensed and ordained to the work of the gospel ministry. In 1896, when the Presbytery of Kiamichi was organized, he was enrolled as one of its charter members. He was then living at Atoka. During the next year he served New Hope and Sandy Branch Churches, but continued to reside in Atoka until 1900, when he located at Lukfata. Three years later he took charge of Bethany, near Wheelock, and in 1905, effected the organization of the Church in the new town of Garvin. In 1910, he voluntarily resigned the work at Bethany and the office of stated clerk of the Presbytery, and located at Eufaula. As a minister and life-long teacher, he rendered a very helpful service to the various communities, in which he lived and...

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Biography of Hon. Samuel Morton Rutherford

Samuel Morton Rutherford has always been keenly alive to his duties and responsibilities as a man and citizen and through the avenue of his profession has done much to uphold the legal and moral status of his community. Residing in Muskogee, he is recognized as one of the eminent members of the bar of this section of the state, attaining high position in a calling where advancement depends entirely upon individual merit and ability. Samuel M. Rutherford is indebted to the public school system of Fort Smith, Arkansas, for his early educational privileges and later he enjoyed the benefit of instruction in the Emory and Henry College, being numbered among its Bachelor of Arts alumni of 1883. His law studies were pursued also in Fort Smith and after thorough preliminary training he was admitted to the bar. He entered at once upon the active work of his profession but within a short time was appointed under sheriff of his county in 1884, filling the position until 1892, when he removed to Atoka, then in Indian Territory, and for two years occupied the position of United States commissioner. His life for several years thereafter was devoted to public service and his labors were of a most beneficial character. He was United States marshal for the Northern District of Indian Territory from 1895 until the early part of 1898. On the...

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Tauscher, Esther Juanita – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Esther Juanita Tauscher, 89, of La Grande, died May 27 at Grande Ronde Hospital. A celebration of life will begin at 1 p.m. Saturday at Daniels Chapel of the Valley. Esther was born July 15, 1917, the daughter of O. Dee and Ozie (Joplan) Collie in Wardville, Okla. She lived in La Grande from 1945 until 1962 when she moved to Portland where she worked as a meat wrapper for Safeway and later for Albertsons. She retired after 35 years. She returned to La Grande five years ago. She loved dancing, reading and sewing. She enjoyed spending time and doing things for her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Survivors include her sons, Jimmy Stone and Dean Stone, both of La Grande; sisters, Ann McGuire of California and June Wada of Portland; nine grandchildren; 16 great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; numerous nieces and nephews and other relatives. She was preceded in death by her son, Bobby Stone; sisters, Louise Kirkpatrick, Grace Anderson, Lois Barrows and Iva Slate; brothers, Jack Collie and Pete Collie and great-grandchild, Zacary Leavitt. Memorials may be made to the Blue Mountain Humane Association in care of Daniels Chapel of the Valley, 1502 Seventh St., LaGrande 97850. La Grande Observer – Obituaries For The Week Ending June 16, 2007 Published: June 16, 2007 Transcribed by Dixie...

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