Location: Ashland County OH

Illinois Burial Customs

The term Illinois Indians as used by some early writers was intended to include the various Algonquian tribes, encountered in the “Illinois country,” in addition to those usually recognized as forming the Illinois confederacy. Thus, in the following quotation from Joutel will be found a reference to the Chahouanous – i. e., Shawnee – as being of the Islinois, and in the same note Accancea referred to the Quapaw, a Siouan tribe living on the right bank of the Mississippi, not far north of the mouth of the Arkansas. Describing the burial customs of the Illinois, as witnessed by him during the latter years of the seventeenth century, Joutel wrote: ” They pay a Respect to their Dead, as appears by their special Care of burying them, and even of putting into lofty Coffins the Bodies of such as are considerable among them, as their Chiefs and others, which is also practised among the Accancea’s, but they differ in this Particular, that the Accancea’s weep and make their Complaints for some Days, where as the Chahoaanous, and other People of the Islinois Nation do just the Contrary; for when any of them die, they wrap them up in Skins, and then put them into Coffins made of the Barks of Trees, then sing and dance about them for twenty four Hours. Those Dancers take Care to tie Calabashes, or...

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Biography of David Greiner

DAVID GREINER. – Although the subject of this sketch has not been a resident of this county so long as some, still he is one of the doughty and intrepid pioneers of the adjacent state, having pressed into the unbroken regions of the west in early times, and he has ever wrought for the advancement of the country where he has dwelt, manifesting true wisdom and stanch integrity and faithfulness in all of his endeavors,which have won for him esteem and respect throughout his large acquaintance. Mr. Greiner was born in Ashland county, Ohio, on May 7, 1837, to Martin and Elizabeth (Gipe) Greiner, farmers of that state. In 1849 the father departed this earthy life and in 1869 the mother was called to lay down its burdens. David remained at home during the years of his minority, receiving a good education from the public schools and learning and perfecting himself in the carpenter trade. In 1856 he followed the advice of the noted sage and went to the west, stopping in Iowa, where he wrought at his trade until 1860, then returned to the place of his birth, remaining until 1863. The following year he took up the journey across the plains, passing through the Grande Ronde valley September 12, 1864. He stopped at Walla Walla and there wrought at his trade and took up a ranch. He...

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Biographical Sketch of Edmund G. Ross

Edmund G. Ross, one of the leaders in favor of a free Kansas, a pioneer editor of Topeka, afterward United States senator to succeed Gen. James H. Lane. He was born at Ashland, Ohio, December 7, 1826; mustered the printer’s trade, spent several years as a journeyman, and was engaged in newspaper work at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, when Lawrence was sacked in 1856. He started overland in charge of a party of free-state men, who upon their arrival at Topeka, took the field with the anti-slavery forces. After the invaders had been driven out, Mr. Ross entered into partnership with his brother in the publication of the Kansas Tribune. He took an active interest in politics, was a member of the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention in 1859, and at its close began the publication of the Kansas State Record at Topeka, which became a very influential republican organ. In 1860 his paper aided in calling a territorial convention to plan a scheme for secnring a practical railroad system for the anticipated State of Kansas. He assisted in raising the Eleventh Kansas Infantry in 1862, and at the organization of the regiment was elected captain of a company. Subsequently Governor Carney appointed him major of the regiment, when it was changed from infantry to cavalry, and he was present with his command in all the battles in which it was engaged. In...

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Biography of Columbus M. Hixon

Many articles have appeared in the press of our land on the “corruption in politics.” but, while this may be found to some extent in the largest cities, the majority of our American citizens are too practical and public-spirited to wish to entrust their affairs in unscrupulous hands, and especially in the selection of one to manage the financial interests do they show great discrimination in choosing a man of known integrity and unimpeachable honor. It was these qualities which secured to Mr. Hixon election to the responsible position of county treasurer of Washington County. His record in the walks of public and private life had been as an open book, and his honesty, combined with excellent business ability, led to his selection for the office which he is now so acceptably filling. Mr. Hixon was born in Ashland County, Ohio, Tune 3, 1854, and is the third in order of birth “of the five children of Jacob and Casandre (Stonebreaker) Hixon, who were natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio, respectively. Subsequently they became residents of Indiana, and thence went to Holton, Kansas. The father is accounted one of the leading and influential citizens of the community and has been honored with a number of county offices. He is a man of the highest integrity; fully meriting the confidence reposed in him. Holton is still his home. He has been...

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Biography of James R. Strong

James Russell Strong, judge of the probate court of Latah County, was born in Sullivan, Ashland County, Ohio, September 24, 1849. His great-grandfather, Russell Strong, was a resident of Vermont and participated in the events which go to form the early history of the Green Mountain state. His son, Alvah Strong, grandfather of our subject, was a participant in the war of 1812 when but a boy, and for one year served in the Union army during the civil war as a member of Company F, First Nebraska Volunteer Infantry. He participated in the battle of Fort Donelson and after the battle of Shiloh received an honorable discharge on account of his advanced age. He spent his last days with his son, Orrin R. Strong, and his grandson, James R. Strong, and had passed the ninetieth milestone on life’s journey when called to his final rest. Orrin R. Strong, father of our subject, was born in Ellicottville, Cattaraugus county, New York, September 30, 1823, and having arrived at years of maturity married Miss Amanda Gibbs who was born in Rutland county, Vermont, a daughter of Elijah Gibbs, of that state. Mr. Strong was a farmer, but at the time of the rebellion he put aside all business cares and personal considerations to enter his country’s service, as a member of Company C, Fourth Regiment of Missouri Cavalry. On the...

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Biographical Sketch of Russell Emmett Burdick

Burdick, Russell Emmett; merchant; born, Alfred, N. Y., May 28, 1848; son of Russell W. and Malvina A. (Middaugh) Burdick; educated, Alfred University; married, Ashland County, O., May 24, 1874, Mary H. McCutchen; two daughters and one son; captain commanding Troop A, O. N. G., 1895; capt. 1st Ohio Vol. Cavalry, war with Spain, 1898; aid-de-camp to Gen. Horace Porter, 1897; to Gen. G. M. Dodge, 1897; to Gen. J. F. Bell, 1909; pres. and treas. the Bowler & Burdick Co., jewelers; established,...

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Biographical Sketch of Oriel D. Eshelman

Eshelman, Oriel D.; lawyer; born, Ashland, O.; son of David and Harriett Landis Eshelman; educated, Cleveland and country public schools, West High, German Wallace College and Ohio Northern University, B. S. and LL. B.; admitted to the bar, June, 1909; began practice in Cleveland, August, 1909; not connected with any law firm; director Cleveland Tie Binder; sec’y City Moving & Transfer Co.; director Motor Van Delivery Co.; treas. Interstate Adjustment Co.; member Dover Lodge, F. & A. M., Mount Olive Chapter, Geyer Lodge, K. of P., West Side Chamber of Industry, West End Business Mens’ Ass’n; general practice and commercial...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas B. Richards

Richards, Thomas B.; real estate broker; born, Nova, O., Sept. 10, 1869; son of Albert N. and Clarioco Poag Richards; married, Nova, April 3, 1889, Carrie B. Bruce; member Phoenix Lodge, I. O. O. F., No. 233, and Protected Home Circle, No. 32, Lorain, O. Recreation:...

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Biographical Sketch of Benjamin Parmely

Parmely, Benjamin; lawyer; born, Ashland, O., Oct. 9, 1869; son of M. B. and Elizabeth Porter Parmley; early education in the public schools of Dayton; two years in Garfield University, Wichita, Kan., LL. B. University of Michigan, 1892; married, Columbus, O., Nov. 16, 1904, Miss Mary E. Tolford; issue, one daughter, Elizabeth; admitted to the bar in 1893, one and one-half years atty. for the Fidelity & Casualty Co., then practiced in the firm of Estep, Dickey, Carr & Goff; later with Kline, Carr, Tolles & Goff; in 1896, organized the law firm of Wilcox, Collister, Hogan & Parmely; in 1903, became associated with James J. Hogan, in general law practice, specializing in corporation law; served as asst. U. S. atty, from May, 1901, to September, 1905, was United States Commissioner for six months; member Cleveland Bar Ass’n, Phi Delta Phi Fraternity, Country, Union, Hermit, Young Men’s Republican, and the Nisi Prius...

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Biography of J. E. Zimmerman

J. E. Zimmerman. President of the Citizens State Bank of Bronson, Mr. Zimmerman had been a factor in the citizenship of Bourbon County for the past fifteen years, and had been an extensive farmer, stock man and oil producer as well as a banker. He was born in Ashland County, Ohio, October 10, 1873, descended from a family which as the name indicates came out of Germany and were early settlers in the State of Ohio. D. H. Zimmerman, his father, was born in Ohio in 1838, spent his early life in that state, was married in Ashland County, and did an extensive business in the buying and shipping of live stock. From Ohio he removed to Sheridan County, Missouri, in 1881, and late in life in February, 1915, he came to Bronson, Kansas, where he died in the following April. He was an active member of the Christian Church, was a Mason and a republican voter. D. H. Zimmerman married Annie Dougherty, who was born in Ohio in 1843 and is now living at Bronson, Kansas. There were three children: Grant, who died when twenty-two years of age; Charles, a farmer and stock raiser in the Panhandle of Texas; and J. E. Zimmerman. J. E. Zimmerman spent most of his early life in Shoridan County, Missouri. He began his education there, and his early training was a mixture...

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Biography of Joel H. Rickel

Joel H. Rickel. Among the citizens of Chanute, one who had had a most interesting career is Joel H. Rickel, a resident of this city since 1896, and now the owner of a carriage and repair shop and the owner of a valuable farm. Mr. Rickel is a veteran of the Civil war, and had been a prominent figure in Grand Army circles, being a past commander of several posts in Kansas and a past department commander of the State of Kansas. He was born in Ashland County, Ohio, December 8, 1844, and is a son of John S. and Jane (Fulks) Rickel. The Rickel family, which originated on the Rhone, Germany, was founded in this country during Colonial times, and three bearing the name fought with the Patriot army during the war of the Revolution, one meeting his death at the battle of Brandywine. Michael B. Rickel, the grandfather of Joel H. Rickel, was born in 1776, in Tascaraugus County, Pennsylvania, and became a pioneer into Ohio, where, in Ashland County, he entered a farm from the Government. There he passed the remainder of a long and industrious life, and died in 1868. John S. Rickel was born in Ashland County, Ohio, in 1813, in the same house in which was born his son, and was reared and educated in the community. He was a millwright by trade...

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Biography of John P. Davis

John P. Davis, Topeka. A resident of Kansas for forty-four years, Mr. Davis has in his career set an example of all that is best in American citizenship, not only to his immediate family but to the public in general. He has been prominent in public and business affairs, and has discharged the responsibilities which have fallen to his lot in a conscientious and able manner. His most potent influence for good has been exercised in business as well as in every day life. By his extensive business connections and his extended personal acquaintance he is one of the well known men of Kansas. Mr. Davis was born in Ashland County, Ohio, January 20, 1839, a son of Amos and Nancy (Crawford) Davis, both of whom were born and reared in Columbiana County, Ohio. His father was a farmer, a man who had the confidence and respect of all who knew him, and a citizen of more than ordinary importance in his community. The record of the life of John P. Davis is not without difficulties met and overcome. He spent his early life on the home farm, attended public schools, and when a young man moved with his parents to McDonough County, Illinois, where he engaged in farming and teaching. Mr. Davis was married to Miss Sarah Horrabin at Blandensville, Illinois, February 11, 1858. Mrs. Davis was born...

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Biography of George W. Scholes

George W. Scholes is a well known and worthy representative of the farming interests of Harlan township, now busily engaged in the cultivation and improvement of one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 26. Nearly every state in the Union has furnished its quota of citizens to Iowa and among those sent by Ohio is Mr. Scholes, whose birth occurred near Loudonville, on the 7th of July1840. He was one of five children born unto Elijah and Caroline (Tracy) Scholes, who were also natives of Ohio. The mother died in that state in 1850 and the father was afterward married in Iowa to Salina Cox. Both died in Harlan township, Page county, Mr. Scholes passing away in 1876 at the age of seventy-seven years. He had followed farming throughout his entire life and had thus provided a comfortable living for his family. By his first marriage he had five children. Benjamin T., now deceased, served in the Twenty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the Civil war. He responded to the country’s first call for troops and on the expiration of the three months’ term of enlistment was again enrolled as a soldier. He was wounded at the battle of Chickamauga but was not discharged until the close of the war. George W. was the second of the family. John W. was a member of the first Nebraska regiment...

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