Location: Albemarle County VA

Biography of James W. Miller

Was born near Staunton, Augusta county, Virginia, May 14, 1823, where he lived with his parents, George M. and Margaret A. Miller, until his fourteenth year. He received a common school education, having attended the early subscription schools of his native county. Leaving home in 1836, he went to Lexington, Rockbridge county, Virginia, where he was employed as a clerk in the store of Moore & McCue, remaining with them until 1840, when he was employed in the same capacity by Samuel B. Finley, of the same place. From Lexington he went to Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1842, and accepted a situation as clerk in the store of John Cochran, remaining until 1843, when he returned to Augusta county and was employed by Thomas McCorkle, of Greenville, where he remained until 1847, then became associated with his employer as a partner, at Anthony’s Creek, Greenbrier county, Virginia, under the firm name of McCorkle & Miller. Retiring from the firm in 1848, he went to Hillsborough, Pocahontas county, same State, where he established himself in the mercantile business and continued there until 1854, when he migrated to Missouri, and settled upon a farm in what is now Jamesport township, this county. In 1861 he cast his lot with the Confederacy, enlisting in the Missouri State Guards, under General William Y. Slack, Captain John McNeel, and serving during the war in the...

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Genealogy of Willis Austin

The sixth child of Henry and Nancy Ann Austin was living in Madison County, Virginia by 1824. There he met Jane Malone and married her. Willis’ occupation to support her and the family was that of a carpenter and farmer. By 1850 the family had grown to nine members. They lived in Worf Town in 1850. They either remained in Virginia or moved to Missouri. 506 Willis Austin born circa 1796 Albemarle Co., Va. married 23 Aug 1823 Jane Malone born circa 1805 Virginia died 30 Sept. 1877 Mo. Children of Willis Austin and Jane Malone: 601 John H. Austin born circa 1824 Madison Co., Va. married Louisa Broyles born 6 Feb. 1837 Madison Co., Va. died 1862/3 Henry Co., Mo. 602 James N. Austin born circa 1827 603 Mary A. Austin born circa 1829 604 Elizabeth Austin born circa 1832 605 Catherine Austin born circa 1833 606 Nathan Franklin Austin born circa 1834’s married Sarah died 8 Nov. 18?5 Shelby Co., Ill. 607 Martha Austin born circa 1837 Sources for the Genealogy of Willis Austin: 1820 Census Albemarle Co., Va. 1850 Census Madison Co., Va. Janet Austin Curtis Records Va. Genealogist Vol. 16, 2, p. 9...

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Genealogy of Henry Austin, Sr.

Henry Austin, Sr., son of Samuel Austin and Elizabeth Marshall. More records are existant on this Austin. In 1758 in Albemarle Co., Virginia, he married Sarah Harrison, probable relation to Richard Harrison. A few years after marriage, Henry received two hundred acres of land in Virginia for his services in Lord John Murray Dunmore’s War. He served as a sergeant in that war; for his services in the French and Indian War, he received another land parcel. In 1790 his neighbors were John Rodes and William Austin, his brother. During that year there were nine in Henry’s family; there were his dwelling and four other buildings on his plantation. “In 1795 Henry Austin conveyed a parcel of land to Thomas Stribling, Samuel Wills, Joseph Hardesty, Bennis Brown, Daniel Maupin, John Gibson, George Bringham, William Oliver and Basil Guess, of Organe, for a church which was then called Austin’s Meeting House, and is no doubt the same as that now known as Bingham’s Church…” (Hist. of Albemarle Co., Va.) The third day of October 1821 Henry Austin wrote his will; it was just under fifty years previous, that Henry had enlisted in the Virginia Militia during the War of the Rebellion. He served as a Lieutenant under the command of General Nelson. Henry was one of the three thousand Virginia Militia who participated in the last war campaign at Yorktown. His will:...

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Genealogy of Henry Austin, Jr.

Like father, like son, Henry Jr., son of Henry Austin, Sr. and Sarah Harrison, became a military man. At the age of seventeen he enlisted in the First Virginia Regiment as a drummer and fifer. He continued serving through November 1779 in the Tenth Virginia Regiment also as a drummer and fifer. After the war, he met Nancy Ann Watts, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Durrett Watts. Her father Jacob likewise served in the War of the Rebellion. Henry and Nancy were married 2 January 1788 in Albemarle County, Virginia. They had twelve children before Henry died in October or November 1809. “(Nancy) Ann Watts died leaving a will dated 12 March 1821 and recorded in Albemarle County, Virginia, 3 Dec. 1821. She married 2 January 1788, Albemarle Co., Va., Henry Austin who died before 6 Nov. 1809. The estates of Henry and Ann Austin were both settled 7 April 1823, with total value of $2521.26. By her will Ann made certain bequests and the balance was divided into twelve parts to Eli Austin, Sarah White, David Austin, Betsey Goodall, Garrett Austin, Willis Austin, Mildred Wood, Durrett Austin, Walker Austin, Caroline Austin, Ann Austin, and Henry Austin, her children.” (p. 98 “Durrett Family” by Mrs. Bert Harter. Virginia Genealogist, Vol. 16 #2, 1972.) 401 Henry Austin, Jr. born 1760 Albemarle Co., Va. married 2 Jan. 1788 Nancy Ann Watts born...

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Biography of the Hensley Brothers

Samuel and Benjamin Hensley were sons of an English family that settled on the Potomac River in Virginia, at an early date. Samuel married a Miss Landers, and they had Samuel, Jr., and William. His first wife died, and he was married again to Susan Taplett, by whom he had several children. William, son of Samuel, Jr., by his first wife, married Elizabeth Appleberry, of Virginia, and they had James, Benjamin, William, Jr., Thomas, Fleming, Judith, and Elizabeth. James, William, Jr., Thomas, and Fleming came to Montgomery County in 1826, and all except Thomas afterward married and settled in Jefferson Co., Mo. Thomas Hensley was born in Albemarle Co., Va., in 1796, and when eighteen years of age he enlisted as a soldier in the war of 1812. He afterward married Harriet Rust, who was a daughter of Samuel Rust and Mary Lee Bailey, who was the daughter of James Bailey and Nancy Smith. Mr. Hensley with his wife and four children, embarked in a keel boat of his own make, on the Pocotalico river, and floated down to the Big Kenhawa, and thence to the Ohio, on their way to Missouri. They reached Louisville in safety, but just below that place their boat sank, and it was with the greatest difficulty that they succeeded in reaching the shore in safety. Here they built a cabin and remained one...

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Biographical Sketch of Gabriel Maupin

Gabriel Maupin, eldest son of Thomas Maupin, of Albemarle Co., Va., married Anna Spencer, by whom he had John, Thomas, Joel, Clifton, David, Arthur T., Susan, Nancy, Polly, Rosana, and Patsey. Arthur T. and Joel married and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in...

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Biographical Sketch of William G. Powell

William G. Powell, of Holland, settled in Albemarle County, Virginia. His son, Lewis G., had three sons, James, Buck, and Lewis, Jr. James married Nancy Shelor, of Germany, and settled in Montgomery County, Missouri, in 1820. They had John W., James W., William L., Thomas J., and two daughters, who died in infancy. After the death of James Powell, his widow, who lived for many years afterward, proved herself to be a woman capable of managing the business affairs of life and carrying them to a successful issue. During the cold winter of 1831-2 she had what is called a “jumping sleigh” built, and went in it to Virginia, one thousand miles distant, by herself, and brought back some Negro slaves in another “jumper” similar to her own. Very few women have ever accomplished such a feat as that. Buck Powell was a very stout man, and it is said that he could lift a barrel of whisky by his teeth and drink from the bung hole. He won a bet of fifty cents one day, by biting a ten penny nail in two, and he certainly earned his money. Thomas J., son of James Powell, is a prominent attorney and citizen of Montgomery County, and lives at New Florence. He has been Sheriff of the County several times, and wields a large influence in political...

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Biographical Sketch of William Farthing

William Farthing, of Albemarle County, Virginia, married Polly Vaughn, and settled in Kentucky. They had Sarah, Elizabeth, William, John, Thomas, and Shelton B. Sarah married James Hunt, who settled in Montgomery County in 1836. Elizabeth married William P. Hill, of Kentucky, who also settled in Montgomery County in 1836. William married Nancy Wood, and settled in Iowa. John married Lucena J. Moran, and settled in Missouri City, Missouri. Shelton B. married Lucy A. Glenn and settled in Montgomery County in...

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Biographical Sketch of James Harris

James Harris, of Wales, married his cousin, a Miss Harris, and settled first in the eastern part of Virginia, but afterward removed and settled in Albemarle County. Their children were Wise, Thomas, Joel, James, and Nathan. Thomas married Susan Darby, of Virginia, by whom he had Anna, Elizabeth, Garrett, William, Robert, Mary, Sarah, and Thomas, Jr. Anna and Elizabeth came to Montgomery County, and the latter married Bernard B. Maupin. Garrett married Jane Ramsey, and settled in Montgomery County in 1837. Their children were William R., Mary B., Anna J., Garrett T., Margaret M., Sarah E., and Susan D. William R. is an influential citizen of Montgomery County. He is at present Probate Judge, has served eight years as County Judge, and several terms as Representative in the Legislature. He is a substantial, upright citizen, and enjoys the confidence and respect of all who know him. He married Margaret N. Bethel, of Virginia. Joel, son of James Harris, Sr., married Anna Waller, by whom he had Clifton, Ira, and Joel, Jr. Clifton married Mary Lewis, by whom he had Decatur, who married his cousin, Isabella Harris, and settled in Montgomery County. Waller C., Charles W., Mann H., Merriwether L., Susan, Catharine B., Matilda and Caroline, children of Ira Harris, settled in Montgomery County. William, son of Thomas Harris, Sr., married Patsey Maupin, and settled in Montgomery County; also his...

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Biography of Victor Craig

Victor Craig, of England, came to America in 1760, and settled in Maryland. He had four sons, William, James, Robert, and Samuel. William and James lived in Albemarle County Va. Samuel was drowned in the Susquehanna River. Robert was a soldier of the revolutionary war. He was married first to Susan Carter, of Virginia, who was afterward killed by the Indians. She lived nine days after having been scalped. Mr. Craig was married the second time to Sarah Ellington, of New Jersey, by whom he had-John, David, Victor, Jonathan, Jacob, Cynthia, Nancy, and Sally. Mr. Craig settled in Montgomery County in 1829, and died the following year. His eldest son, John, married Nancy Cobb, and settled in Montgomery County in 1826. He was a blacksmith by trade, and the first one at Danville. In 1831 he built the Dryden horse-mill, on the Booneslick road, below Danville. The mill was run by a cog wheel, and it required three or four hours to grind a bushel of grain. The hermit, Baughman, whose history is given elsewhere, carried the stones of this mill to his cave, many years after the mill ceased running, and arranged them so he could do his own grinding, by hand. He still uses the same stones. Col. David Craig, brother of John, settled in Montgomery County in 1817, and is still living, in his 87th year....

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Biography of George Octavius Boone

George Octavius Boone had been a resident of Kansas since 1881. In that year he embarked on a career as a commercial traveler, and had been a traveling man now for more than thirty-five years. For several years he represented a Boston shoe firm with headquarters in St. Louis, Baxter Springs, Arkansas City and Longmont, Colorado. Since 1897 his home had been in Topeka, and with the exception of three years he had been connected with the Topeka Daily Capital. The Boone family from whom he is descended had an authentic record of ancestors as far back as 1516. Originally they were of French extraction, the original name being DeBun. Count DeBun in 1516 was exiled from France and settled on the coast of Wales, and his descendants of later generations came to America. Soon after his exile the name came to be spelled Boone, and the distinguished soldier and explorer Daniel Boone was of the same family as my great-grandfather, his ancestors having been born in Southern England. Correction: Octavius Cunningham Boone is not related to Daniel Boone. – David Botts George Octavius Boone was born at Louisville, Kentucky, December 25, Christmas Day, 1861. His grandfather John William Boone was born in 1768, and died in 1867 at the remarkably advanced age of ninety-nine years. He was a veteran of the War of 1812, and the old flintlock...

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Biography of William Horner Cocke

With various corporate interests William Horner Cocke has been closely associated, these various business enterprises benefiting by the stimulus of his industry, keen sagacity and capable management. He has made for himself a most creditable position in business circles and since 1908 has been president and general manager of the Commercial Acid Company which in 1918 became the Southern Acid & Sulphur Company of St. Louis, while with various other concerns he is also associated as stockholder or official. He was born in City Point, Virginia, September 12, 1874. His father, Henry Teller Cocke, was born in Prince George county, Virginia, October 5, 1841, and came of English ancestry, the family having been founded in Surry county, Virginia, in 1684. Representatives in the direct line remained In Prince George county, which was formerly a part of Surry county until William H. Cocke left Missouri in 1894 or for a period of two hundred and ten years. They were always prominent in the social and political life of Virginia. Henry Teller Cocke served for four years with the Prince George Cavalry of the Confederate army and in days of peace devoted his time to farming and merchandising. He married Elizabeth Welsh Horner in December, 1870. She was born April 3, 1848, at Warrenton, Virginia, and was also of English lineage, the Horners having first settled at Port Tobacco, Maryland, but...

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Biography of Malvern Bryan Clopton, M. D.

Thoroughly trained for professional activity in the University of Virginia, with later experience In the Johns Hopkins Hospital at Baltimore, Maryland, Dr. Malvern Bryan Clopton is now engaged in active practice in St. Louis, of which city he is a native. He was born October 8, 1875, his parents being William and Belle (Bryan) Clopton. The father was born in Huntsville, Alabama, and was a descendant of one of the old families of that state of English lineage. The first ancestor in America was Robert Clopton, who came to the new world in 1643 and originally settled in Virginia. Ancestors of Dr. Clopton in both the paternal and maternal lines served in the Revolutionary war. His father was a lawyer by profession and a graduate of the University of Virginia. After the close of the Civil war he came to St. Louis, where he continued in the practice of law to the time of his death. He served as United States district attorney of St. Louis under the Cleveland administration, from 1892 until 1896, and was always a stanch supporter of the democratic party, taking an active interest in state politics in early life. He was also a Civil war veteran, having served under General Forrest with rank as a lieutenant. He passed away in 1912, at the age of sixty-five years. His wife, a native of St. Louis,...

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Biography of Robert M. Funkhouser, M. D.

Dr. Robert M. Funkhouser, a physician and surgeon of St. Louis who has also been connected with the educational activities of the profession and who is now largely concentrating his time and energies upon surgery, was born in St. Louis, December 10, 1850. His father, Robert M. Funkhouser, was a native of Illinois and of Swiss descent, the family being founded in America by John and Christopher Funkhouser, who came to the new world in 1698 and first settled in Fredericktown, Virginia. Among the ancestors of the family were five who participated in the Revolutionary war. The family is also directly related to Daniel Boone. Robert M. Funkhouser, the father, was reared and educated in Illinois and came to Missouri early in the nineteenth century, his birth having occurred at Equality, Illinois, in 1817. Establishing his home in-St. Louis he was a successful merchant of the city for a period of fifty years and passed away in New York city in 1898, at the notable old age of eighty. In politics be was always a stanch democrat and on one occasion refused the nomination for the mayoralty of St. Louis. He took a prominent and active part in public affairs, however, and in many ways was an influential factor in shaping general progress and improvement in the city. He served at one time as president of the Chamber of...

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Biography of Edward Watts Saunders, M. D.

Dr. Edward Watts Saunders, who for forty-three years has engaged in the practice of medicine in St. Louis and who is now professor emeritus of pediatrics and clinical obstetrics in the medical department of Washington University, was born in Campbell county, Virginia, on the 15th of October, 1854, a son of Robert C. and Caryetta (Davis) Saunders. His father was a Civil war veteran, serving as captain of Company A of the Eleventh Virginia Infantry of the Confederate army and winning promotion to the rank of major. In the maternal line was Captain Eugene Davis under General J.E.B. Stuart. He raised a company of calvary for service with the Confederate forces, was captured and imprisoned at Elmira, New York. An uncle, Richard T. Davis, was also a chaplain in the army. The ancestry of the Saunders family in America dates back to the middle of the seventeenth century, when settlement was made at Jamestown by one of the name. On the mother’s side the ancestral line is traced back only through three generations. The grandfather Davis was rector of the University of Virginia and met a tragic death, being assassinated by a drunken student in 1840. The early education of Dr. Saunders was obtained in private schools and the academic department of the University of Virginia. In preparation for his professional career he attended the medical department of the...

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