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Location: Albany County NY

Seneca County New York Genealogy

A guide and directory to Seneca County New York genealogy, containing both online and offline resources for genealogy and historical research. This article contains sources of genealogical data about Seneca County such as biographies, cemetery records, census records, church records, court records, family records, land records, military records, naturalization records, and vital records.

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Captivity and Redemption of Mrs. Jemima Howe – Indian Captivities

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A particular account of the captivity and redemption of Mrs. Jemima Howe, who was taken prisoner by the Indians at Hinsdale, New Hampshire, on the twenty-seventh of July, 1765, as communicated to Dr. Belknap by the Rev. Bunker Gay. As Messrs. Caleb Howe, Hilkiah Grout, and Benjamin Gaffield, who had been hoeing corn in the meadow, west of the river, were returning home, a little before sunset, to a place called Bridgman’s fort, they were fired upon by twelve Indians, who had ambushed their path. Howe...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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Captivity of Elizabeth Hanson – Indian Captivities

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now God’s Mercy Surmounting Man’s Cruelty, Exemplified in the Captivity and Surprising Deliverance of Elizabeth Hanson, Wife of John Hanson, of Knoxmarsh, at Kecheachy, in Dover Township, who was Taken Captive with her Children and Maid-Servant, by the Indians in New England, in the Year 1724. – The substance of which was taken from her own mouth, and now published for general service. The third edition. Philadelphia: reprinted; Danvers, near Salem: reprinted and sold by E. Russell, next the Bell Tavern, MDCCLXXX. At the same place may be had a number of new Books, &c., some of which are on the times. Cash paid for Rags. This edition of Mrs. Hanson’s narrative is copied from that printed at Dover, N. H., in 1821. These editions correspond, and I have discovered no disagreements in them. From a MS. extract, in the hand-writing of Mr. John Farmer, upon the cover of a copy of the Dover edition, it seems there was some doubt in his mind about the exact date of the capture of the Hanson family; for in that memorandum above mentioned, purporting to have been taken from the Boston News-Letter of 1722, it is stated to have happened on the 27th of August of that year. I have not been able to refer to the News-Letter, but...

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Biography of Dewitt Clinton

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now DeWitt Clinton was born at Little Britain, Orange County, N. Y., in. 1769. He died suddenly while engaged in official duty at Albany, February 11, 1828. His paternal ancestors, although long resident in Ireland, were of English origin, and his mother was of Dutch-French blood. He was educated at Columbia College, graduating with high honors. Choosing the law for his avocation, he studied law under Samuel Jones, afterwards Chief Justice of the United States Superior Court. He was admitted to the Bar in 1788 and entered immediately into political life, being an ardent supporter of his uncle, George Clinton. He took an active interest in the adoption of the Federal Constitution, and reported for the press the proceedings of the convention held for that purpose, also acting as private secretary for his uncle. His first office was Secretary of the Board of Regents of the University, and the next, Secretary of the Board of Commissioners of state fortifications. In 1797 he was elected to the State Assembly as a representative from New York City, where he made his residence, and the next year was chosen State Senator for four years. In 1802, when but 33 years of age, he was appointed a Senator of the United States. He labored for the abolition of slavery and its...

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Biography of Thomas Page

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now For upwards of half a century, Thomas Page has been one of the prominent commercial figures in Kansas. With possibly one exception, he is the oldest miller in the state, and for years has been a factor in the milling and grain interests and as much as any other individual has contributed to make Topeka a center for the manufacture of flour. A native of Scotland, he was born in the little manufacturing hamlet of Dunshalt in Fifeshire, September 3, 1843. With a practical schooling he began an apprenticeship in the milling business. For some time he was employed in a mill on the River Clyde, where he daily witnessed the arrival and departure of some of the great ocean vessels which brought to him all the sense of mystery and the messages of far off lands which the sight of them inspires. No doubt it was the vessels plying between America and Great Britain that gave him his first definite idea of making the United States his future home. It was in 1866, when he was twenty-three years of age, that he took passage on one of these vessels for America. Not long after his arrival he found employment at his trade in Albany, New York. Then in 1869 he started westward, for a short...

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Biographical Sketch of Colonel and Judge Oscar E. Learnard

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Colonel and Judge Oscar E. Learnard, one of the founders of Burlington, for many years a resident of Lawrence, one of the organizers of the republican party in Kansas and prominent in numerous state institutions and enterprises, was born at Fairfax, Vermont, November 14, 1832. He was of English and Franch Huguenot stock. In 1855, the year after his graduation from the Albany Law School, Mr. Learnard came to Kansas and located at Lawrence, and the next year he commanded a “mounted regiment” of the free-state forces in the border war. In the spring of 1857 he helped to locate and lay out the Town of Burlington, where he built the first mill, the first business house, and a building used for school and church purposes. He was a member of the Council in the first freestate Legislature (1857); was president of the convention which met at Osawatomie on May 18, 1859, and organized the republican party in Kansas; and after the state government was established became judge of the Fifth Judicial Circuit. That position he resigned to enter the army as lieutenant-colonel of the First Kansas Infantry, and served on the staffs of Generals Hunter and Denver until 1863, when he resigned his commission. When Price undertook to enter Kansas, in the fall of 1864,...

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Biography of Charles J. Price

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Topeka had in Charles J. Price as a resident one of the most capable mining engineers of the country. His had been an experience very much out of the ordinary. Nearly forty years ago he was a mine worker in the Black Hill region. He had a practical working knowledge of the mincral sections of the northwest country. He spent a number of years as a mining engineer in South Africa, and probably no American citizen had a closer knowledge of the people, the industrial conditions, of South Africa than Mr. Price. While there he served with the rank of captain in the British army during the Boer war. Born in County Kent, England, January 20, 1857, he was brought by his parents in 1858 to the United States. John and Buth (Relf) Price located in Sullivan County, New York, where his father was engaged in railroad construction work. In 1869, having a relative in Kansas and thinking that better opportunities were to be found in the West, John Price moved to Atchison and while there assisted in building the Missouri Pacific and Atchison and Nebraska (now a part of the Burlington system) Railroad. All his later years were spent in Kansas, and he died in Topeka in 1912. His widow still survives him and lives...

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Biography of Wolf Lewis

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Wolf Lewis. The modern merchant is the man who knows what the people want and supplies the best facilities for meeting those wants. He acts on that solid commercial principle that real success is only a return for an adequate service rendered. Of Champaign merchants of this class there is no more conspicuous example than Wolf Lewis, whose department store in the large Illinois Building means to Champaign County about what the Marshall Field store means to the shopping public of Chicago. Mr. Lewis is a merchant almost by birthright, but has profited by a long and thorough experience and has been tested by the fire of adversity as well as by the stimulus of prosperity. Along with success in his private business ventures, he has combined a public spirit which has made him a factor in civic improvement and municipal betterment. He is looked upon as a man of the finest character and useful influence. Mr. Lewis is a native of Poland, where he was born May 15, 1858, a son of Reuben and Eva (Lewis) Lewis, both natives of Poland. The mother died in Poland when her son Wolf was a very small child. Reuben Lewis then immigrated to the United States, located at Troy, New York, and engaged in the wholesale dry goods...

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Biography of John Pattison

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now JOHN PATTISON. – The subject of this sketch was born in Albany, New York, in 1859, and is the son of John and Elizabeth Pattison. His father was a Union soldier during the war of the Rebellion. He lived at home until he was fourteen years old, being educated in the city public schools. In 1873 he went to Silverton, Colorado, and engaged in mining for six years with varying though reasonable success. he went from there through Arizona and New Mexico, looking for a better mining location, and spending about two years in that country, making money, but at heavy expense. He came from there to Colfax, Washington Territory, in April 1882. He worked for about two years with the construction party in building the Palouse branch of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Palouse Junction, on the Northern Pacific Railroad, to Colfax, being employed in the position of commissary. He secured an interest in the Colfax Hotel, and was one of the proprietors of that house for two and a half years, jointly with Joseph Ryan. He was married on the 7th of June, 1885, to Miss Mary C. Cairns, daughter of Reverend James Cairns, present pastor of the Colfax Baptist church, and financial agent of Colfax College. He sold his interest in...

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Biography of Levi Livermore Tucker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Levi Livermore Tucker, late superintendent and president of the Kansas Wesleyan Business College of Salina, devoted practically his entire life to the training of young men and women for business. Fully forty years were given to that profession, and few men accomplished a more satisfying aggregate of results in this field than Professor Tucker. He was of New England birth and ancestry. The farm in Orange County, Vermont, where he was born December 10, 1853, was also the birthplace of his father, Levi Livermore Tucker, Sr., and the house that thus served as a birthplace to these two generations was also the birthplace of Professor Tucker’s oldest living child. Mr. Tucker’s mother was Betty Putnam Carleton, also a native of Vermont. His early education Mr. Tucker acquired in the Vermont Conference Seminary at Newbury, where he was graduated with the class of 1874 at the age of twenty-one. He afterwards took a two years’ course in the Troy Rosiness College of Troy, New York, and for one year taught in the Troy Conference Business College at Courtney, Vermont. Following that came three years spent as principal of the Schofield Business College of Providence, Rhode Island. For fourteen years Mr. Tucker was principal of the New Jersey Business College at Newark, then for one year had charge...

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Biography of Miller M. Van Denberg

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Miller M. Van Denberg. One of El Dorado’s oldest business men and citizens is Miller M. Van Denberg, who had lived in that community for thirty-nine years. The name is most prominently associated with the lumber business. In that connection it is known not only in El Dorado but in many other towns of Kansas and Oklahoma. Mr. Van Denberg had owned at different times as many as twenty-three lumber yards in these two states. However, his home had always been at El Dorado. Perhaps the chief fruit of his many years of business effort had been the opportunity presented to follow the voeation of his original choice, farming. Mr. Van Denberg does not follow farming as a fad, but on a fairly practical basis. However, the cultivation of the soil is to him a keen pleasure. He was reared on a farm and throughout his business career had always retained his love for the open spaces made beautiful by the fruition of nature. Though the better part of his life had been spent in Kansas, Mr. Van Denberg was born in Albany County, New York, September 24, 1852. He is of good old Dutch stock, and the Van Denbergs were settlers in the Province of New York prior to the¬†Revolutionary¬†war. His father, G. P. Van...

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Biography of D. Maynard Dibble

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now D. Maynard Dibble. Steady application to the development of an idea had brought about the material success and business prorninence of D. Maynard Dibble, now well known in business circles in Topeka. He had practically been a resident of this city all of his life, for he was brought here when but nine months old, and from earliest youth had been identified with business affairs. While he is vice president of the Citizens State Bank, the major part of his attention had always been devoted to the grocery and market business, and through initiative, natural resource and an intelligent use of modern methods he is rapidly building up a chain of snterprises that is making his name one of the best known in this direction in Topeka. Mr. Dibble was born in New York, on a farm near Albany, June 11, 1874, a son of D. Willis and Rena (Simmons) Dibble, natives of the Empire State. His grandfather, who was also born in New York, Daniel W. Dibble, served all through, the Revolutionary war as a soldier of the Continental line, and when his military career was flnished went to a farm in the vicinity of Albany, where he became engaged in general farming and stock raising. It was there that D. Willis Dibble was born...

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Biography of John Hallenbeck

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In March 1864, John Hallenbeck became a resident of Silver City, and from that time until his death, throughout the period of pioneer development and latter-day progress, he was prominently identified with its upbuilding and interests. A native of the Empire state, he was born in Albany, October 24, 1830, and was of Holland lineage. His ancestors were among the early settlers of New York and participated in the events which form the colonial and Revolutionary history of that state. The maternal grand-father of our subject was also one of the heroes of the war for independence, and his wife afterward received a pension in recognition of his services. He lived to be seventy-eight years of age, while her death occurred when she had attained the advanced age of eighty-seven. Mathew Hallenbeck, the father of our subject, was born in New York, and married Catharine Shoudy, a native of the same state. He devoted his energies to many pursuits, having been a carpenter and joiner, also a teacher of music and a teacher in the public schools. In 1841 he removed with his family to Syracuse, New York, and in 1854 to Cordova, Illinois, where he resided up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1878. Both he and his wife were members of...

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