Location: Addison Vermont

Biography of William Allis

William Allis, from Massachusetts, came to Addison in 1785, locating upon the farm now Owned by Edgar, son of the late Nathaniel Allis, who was his last surviving child. The present house was built by Nathaniel in 1831, succeeding the old log...

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Biography of Gen. David Whitney

General David Whitney came here soon after the Revolution and located upon the farm previously owned by Kellogg; but subsequently removed to a farm on the north bank of Ward’s Creek, where lie resided until a few years previous so his death, when he removed to Bridport. He died May 10, 1850, aged ninety-three years. He was a member of the constitutional conventions of 1793, 18I4, 1836 and 1843; represented Addison in the Legislatures of 1790, ’92, ’93, ’97, 1808 to 1815 and ’24, and was during his long life here one of the leading men of the...

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Biography of Daniel Champion

Daniel Champion, a Revolutionary soldier, was an early settler, locating near Chimney Point Newell B. Smith, who came here in 1800, and afterward served in the War of 1812, married Electa, one of Daniel’s twelve children. Austin Smith is the only one of their children now...

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Biography of Benjamin Kellogg

Benjamin Kellogg brought his family into the town in 1766. He traded his farm of one hundred acres in Connecticut for 3,000 acres lying in Addison and Panton. When the settlers were driven off, Kellogg went to Mount Hope, N. Y., with his family, and subsequently to Bennington, where he took part in the battle there. Subsequently he and Lieutenant Everest came back to Addison to look after the cattle they had left here, and found that a Mr. Gale had sold them to the British, and had also reported their owners as spies. They were both captured on the strength of this accusation, but Everest escaped, while Kellogg was taken to St. Johns, where he was imprisoned about a year. He was then liberated, but in making his way to a neighboring village was so badly frozen that he died soon after. Mrs. Kellogg died at Ticonderoga in...

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Biography of Elijah Elmer

Elijah Elmer, from Amherst, Mass., came to Addison in 1783, locating upon the farm now owned by his grandson, Wright Elmer. He had a family of four sons, only one of whom, Chester, attained mature age. He married a sister of Governor Silas...

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Biography of Zadock Everest

Zadock Everest came to Addison in the summer Of 1765 and began his clearing, as before mentioned. On his place he built a log house and there kept the first public house in the county. After the breaking out of the war he fled his family to Whitehall, and from thence sought refuge in Pawlet, Rutland county, where he was elected representative in March, 1784. During that year he returned to Addison, and represented the town of Panton in 1785 and Addison in 1788, 1789 and 1795; he also held the prominent town offices through a series of years and was a prominent man. His dwelling was used for a time as the county court-house, and afterwards as a dwelling and a jail. Mr. Everest’s remains rest in Lake View, cemetery, and the following inscription marks his tomb-stone: HERE REST THE REMAINS OF ZADOCK EVEREST, ESQ., Born in Saybrook, Conn., March 5, 1744. In the fourth year of his age he removed with his father, Benjamin Everest, to Salisbury, Conn., where he lived until twenty-one years of age : in the fall of the same year, A. D. 1765, he removed to Addison, Vt., where he lived until Arnold’s defeat on Lake Champlain, A. D. 1776, at which time he was driven from his home by the enemy: In May, 1783, after the close of the Revolutionary War, he...

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Biography of James Stickle

James Stickle, born in New Jersey in 1769, came to Addison in early life, locating in the eastern part of the town, where he died December 18, 1850. The homestead came into Charles Stickle’s possession in 1847, who was born in 1807, and in 1878 reverted to H. A. Stickle, the present owner, it having never left the family since it was reclaimed from the...

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Biography of Samuel J. Benedict

Samuel J. Benedict is a son of John Benedict, an early settler in Weybridge, who died in Cornwall in 1873, aged eighty-seven years. S. J. Benedict has been in Addison thirty-four years, thirty-one of which on this place, which he sold to his son-in-law, Frederick P. Owen, in the spring of...

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Biography of John Strong

The Strong family has been a prominent one in this town. The Hon. John Strong was born in Salisbury, Conn., in 1738 and came to Addison in February, 1766, as before noted. After he was driven away from his settlement by the British he went to Dorset, which town he represented in the Legislature from 1779 to 1782, and in 1781 he was elected assistant judge of Bennington county, and re-elected in 1782. In 1783 he returned to his former home in this town. His first dwelling here was built near the lake and destroyed by the British. In 1796 he built his brick residence, the brick for which were made on the farm. He represented Addison in the Legislature three years, from 1784, and in 1785 was elected first judge of the Addison County Court. In 1786 he was elected judge of probate and a member of the Council; these offices he held until 1801. In 1791 he was a member of the convention which ratified the constitution of the United States. He died in June, 1816, and many of his descendants are still residents of this town and vicinity. His son, the Hon. John W. Strong, was a prominent man in the town; the son of the latter, Charles W., still lives in the town. For their historical value we quote from Mr. Strong’s sketch of the...

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Biography of John Fisher

John Fisher, from Massachusetts, located in the eastern part of the town, upon the farm now owned by Osman H. Fisher, at an early date. The homestead passed into the hands of his son Henry, and from him reverted to Osman H. John, whose remains rest in the cemetery near Olin Smith’s place, had a family of five...

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Biography of James Hindes

James Hindes came from New Jersey in 1800, locating upon the farm now owned by Aaron Hindes, in that part of the town known as “Nortontown.” The homestead descended from James to Aaron, and thence to Aaron, jr., who has been a prominent man in town affairs, being now upwards of seventy-five years of...

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Biography of Wheeler French

Wheeler French located in Addison in 1833, and his father, Nathaniel, was one of the early settlers in New Haven. George, son of Wheeler, now resides here, one of the ex-representatives of the town in the General...

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Biography of Asahel Barnes

Asahel Barnes was a native of Bristol, Conn. From there he removed to New Haven, where he remained about seven years, then went to Canada and remained two years, and finally in 1823 came to Addison, locating upon the place now occupied by his son Asahel, Jr. The earliest settler on this place was Benjamin Paine, though Mr. Barnes bought it of James Lewis, whose wife was an adopted daughter of Paine. Mr. Barnes died In June, 1859, in his eighty-second year, while on a visit to his daughter, Mrs. Alfred Roscoe, of New Haven. Asahel, Jr., was born in 1810, at Bristol, Conn., and came to Addison with his father. He purchased the homestead in 1844. In 1837 he removed to Canada, but returned in 1845. Mr. Barnes married Salina Northrup, of Burlington, October 8, 1844, who died May 14, 1847, and in November, 1849, he married Ellen S. Crane, of Addison. Mr. Barnes has had six children born to him, though but four are living, viz.: Charles N., born March 28, 1847 now residing with his father; Albert, born in June, 1853, now of Chicago ; Ella, born in September, 1854, wife of Winslow C. Watson, of Plattsburgh, N. Y.; and Millard Fillmore, born August 21,...

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